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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 07, 2016 by

How to network in the workplace

Two businessmen talking and smiling photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Congratulations on landing your new entry-level job or internship! Perhaps you landed it through networking. If so, that means you understood how to approach interacting with family, friends, and/or recruiting and talent acquisition professionals during your job search.

Now it’s time to transition from networking to find a job to networking in the workplace. This is an opportunity to demonstrate your skills and qualities and learn from established employees who can help you along the way. Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services and LEEP Center Adviser at Clark University, explains how new hires should approach networking in the workplace.

“The first step is to establish yourself as a hard-working, competent, young professional. Making a good first impression in your new role will get your colleagues’ attention and increase the likelihood they will be willing to assist in your career development. At the same time, you need to assimilate into the culture of your organization and begin to create collegial working relationships. If you begin networking too early, it may appear you are too focused on your future rather than your current role.

Once you have established yourself, identify someone one level above you whose position or career path you’re interested in. Start with people you already know. Your goal is to secure an informational interview where you ask questions about the professional’s career trajectory and solicit advice on your potential goals. People generally like to talk about themselves and like to give advice, so you should get a positive response as long as you are polite and professional.

Another goal of that conversation should be expanding your network by asking the professional for names of other professionals they can introduce you to. Etiquette is important in this process so remember that written communication should be formal and professional, and follow-up thank you notes are essential. Above all, be willing to listen and be open to the advice you receive.”

Need more help with networking? Learn more on our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center

Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center

Vickie Cox-Lanyon is Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center at Clark University. Cox-Lanyon provides career and academic guidance to students and alumni throughout their career development process. She has been in the field of career services since 1997 and is a member of the National Career Development Association, the National Association of Colleges and Employers, and the Liberal Arts Career Network, through which she participates in annual professional development activities. She holds a BA in Psychology from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and an MS in Psychology from the University of Rhode Island.

Posted May 09, 2016 by

6 common mistakes grads make when searching for entry-level jobs

First Job word; business man touching on red tab virtual screen courtesy of Shutterstock.com

PhuShutter/Shutterstock.com

Recently, research from the Australian government shows how the shift from college education to full-time employment is becoming more challenging. Job prospects for young Australians are decreasing and on the other hand, recent graduates are making key mistakes when searching for entry-level jobs. Open Colleges, one of Australia’s leading online educators, has gathered information from a variety of recruiters to help recent graduates understand their mistakes when applying for entry-level jobs. Avoid these most common mistakes to avoid when searching for entry-level jobs.

1. Negative attitude towards work

Australian government research confirmed young people do not have enough of a positive attitude towards work. Recruiters recommend job seekers be more motivated and demonstrate enthusiasm to potential employers.

According to the study, young people need to be more responsible and reliable concerning their behavior and approach to their jobs. Recruiters suggest working with a business for a while, coming in to shifts, being punctual, and showing respect to colleagues, and customers or clients.

2. Think learning is over after college

Recruiters ask young professionals to be more open to learning when they start their first entry-level jobs. We all need to continue learning during our professional lives to stay updated with industry changes. But when starting a new job, it is especially important to have the right attitude towards learning because everything is new; employees will need to gain knowledge of the working process in their new companies and the different procedures to complete work correctly and in a timely manner. Your first employer is giving you an excellent opportunity to learn and gain valuable experience, so absorb as much as you can.

3. Underestimate the importance of previous work experience

Even though job seekers are applying for their first full-time entry-level jobs, having some related work experience will give them a competitive advantage. This may be some volunteer work done while still in school or some unpaid jobs during the summer. Don’t underestimate this experience; include it on your resume and tell your interviewers about it.

Studies are essential, but having first-hand experience shows employers that you have some practical skills and a better understanding of work responsibilities and professional work life.

4. Failure to make a good first impression

Whoever says his opinion is not influenced by the first impression is lying. In an interview, job seekers only have a few seconds to convince interviewers that they are the right candidates, so along with their studies, work experience, and the right attitude, their presentations during interviews will play an important role in their success in landing their first full-time jobs.

According to the research, recent graduates often dress inappropriately for work and have untidy hair, so recruiters recommend paying special attention to appearance. Not every company’s dress code is the same, so make sure to verify details about the company culture before an interview in order to dress appropriately.

5. Poor job search and application skills

When looking for their first jobs, Australian young professionals are making very common mistakes, according to research. These skills improve with time and practice, but a couple pieces of advice recruiters give are: make sure each application (resume and cover letter) is tailored to the position for which you are applying, and always double check your application’s spelling and grammar. Recruiters see these types of mistakes as a lack of attention to detail and unacceptable in today’s marketplace.

Recruiters also suggest job seekers approach employers directly after providing their resumes and personally following up with them.

6. Unrealistic work expectations

When applying for their first entry-level jobs after college, recent graduates need to understand they cannot “start at the top.” They have to make an effort to work their way up through the business.

Another common mistake is to expect high compensation. This will also come with time as employees gain experience and assume more responsibilities. The nature of the work they do may not be exactly what they want initially, but as long as workers are learning and doing something they like, they are on the right path.

Need more tips for your job search? Check out our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Maria Onzain, guest writer

Maria Onzain, guest writer

Maria Onzain is a content marketing expert writing for Open Colleges about education, career, and productivity. She is passionate about all things digital, loves technology, social media, start-ups, travelling, and good food.

Posted August 20, 2014 by

Not Qualified Enough to Land Your Dream Entry Level Job? 3 Tips to Stand Out from Other Job Seekers

If you don’t believe you can land the entry level job of your dreams because you’re not qualified, think again.  The following post shares three tips to help you stand out from other job seekers.

“Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.” — Abraham Lincoln If all you did was submit your cover letter and resume, you’re screwed. Why? Because someone out there speaks one more language, has a one point higher GPA or has one more year

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Posted August 20, 2014 by

College Graduates, Are You Smartphone Users Searching for Jobs or Managing Tasks at Work? 5 Apps You May Like

For college graduates searching for jobs or trying to manage a workload at the office, there are five smartphone apps that might benefit them in the following post.

Glued to your smartphone? Whether you’re walking down the street, on the train or sitting in the carpool on the way home, you (and everyone around you) are probably heads down, checking the latest activity on your social networks, catching up on news or texting loved ones. The average American has approximately 32 apps on their

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Posted August 14, 2014 by

College Graduates, Are You Keeping a Record of Accomplishments on Your Jobs? 4 Reasons It’s Important for Your Career

While on their jobs, college graduates should consider keeping a record of their accomplishments.  Learn four reasons why doing so is important for their careers in the following post.

Do you keep an active list of career accomplishments, responsibilities and results? Do you obsess over quantifying your contributions at work? You should, because your career, someday, may depend on it…

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Posted August 14, 2014 by

Starting an Entry Level Job? 5 Tips to Find Success Early in Your Career

If you’re about to begin an entry level job, learn five tips to find early career success in the following post.

The primary advantage of having a mentor and listening to solid career advice: the head start it gives your career Through these mentors, and their been-there-done-that advice, you have the opportunity to skip the mistakes others have made – and to quickly learn the secrets of success – while

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Posted August 07, 2014 by

College Students, 7 Soft Skills that Can Help You Land Jobs in Today’s Job Market

College students can boost their chances of landing jobs in today’s job market by possessing these seven soft skills found in the following post.

What skills employers will come to value most as we move away from Industrial Age thinking, and dive even deeper into the Social Age? What soft skills no one even talked about five years ago must we must we pay attention to as we strive to compete well in the job market

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Posted July 31, 2014 by

Searching for Entry Level Jobs, Recent Grads? 10 Things You Might Have Done Differently While in College

When it comes to searching for entry level jobs, recent graduates might have thought about changing some things during their college years.  In the following post, learn 10 things they might have done differently.

While still in school, it can be easy to keep reality on the back-burner. Unfortunately, that often leads to a lack of preparation… and a tough job search after graduation. The reality is that college students everywhere are learning that you must be ready to compete for the job, aggressively, well before you walk across that stage, diploma in

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Posted July 30, 2014 by

Want to Use LinkedIn as an Advantage to Find an Internship or a Job? 7 Steps You Can Take

For those of you trying to find an internship or a job on LinkedIn, the following post has seven steps you can take to use the site to your advantage.

Many college students, recent graduates and young professional are starting to see the power of LinkedIn. However, the one thing they learn very quickly is that they don’t yet have the quantity or quality of contacts necessary to leverage the world’s largest professional network. The best of them, however, don’t let that stop them from using

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Posted July 21, 2014 by

Interviewing for Entry Level Jobs? Dress for Success with These Tips

Candidates interviewing for entry level jobs will leave an impression in the minds of their interviewers based on what they wear.  Learn how candidates should dress for success for these meetings from an infographic in the following post.

The call just came… you have a job interview! You’re so excited you tell everyone who will listen. You text your best friends and email your closest mentor. You call your mother and significant other. And right after all the congratulations, invariably someone is going to ask: “What are you going to wear?”

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