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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 19, 2019 by

After the Interview: What Not to Do

As Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers sang, “The waiting is the hardest part.” (If you don’t know who Tom Petty is, stop reading now and go listen to some of his music!) While a job interview can be very stressful, waiting to hear back can be even harder. If you prepared for the job interview and answered the questions to the best of your ability, you’ve done everything you can, and now it’s out of your control. Or is it?

Even if you aced the interview, you could jeopardize your chances of getting the job by:

Apologizing or “correcting” your responses.

It’s human nature to replay the job interview in your mind. But, obsessing over what you might have said differently or wishing you could take back a comment is a waste of time and energy. A more productive idea is to write down things that you’d like to do differently in the next job interview or examples you want to include. However, never include an apology or correction in your thank you letter or follow-up communication. Chances are, the interviewer didn’t even notice the “error” you made or the remark you wish you hadn’t, so why point it out? Second guessing yourself shows a lack of confidence.

Harassing the hiring manager.

It’s standard practice to send a thank you letter within 24-48 hours of the job interview. Once you’ve done that, don’t communicate until the date the hiring manager told you they’d be in touch. Unless you have a very urgent question or something major comes up, there’s no reason for you to contact the hiring manager.

Should you email or call to let him or her know that you’re still very interested in the job? No. What about a quick note to ask about the status? Again, no. Hiring managers are inundated with messages already. Don’t reach out again until a few days after the date he or she told you that you’d be hearing from them.

Posting anything about the interview on social media.

If you had a great job interview, it can be tempting to share your excitement about the opportunity or experience on social media. You might even think it’s cool to tag the company. However, you don’t know what the company’s social media policy is, so by posting you might be violating their standards unknowingly. Play it safe and keep your thoughts private, and brag to your friends and family offline.

Ghosting the hiring manager.

If you accept another job offer or you’ve decided you don’t want this job for any reason, send an email to the hiring manager to let him or her know. Thank the hiring manager for his or her time and the job interview, then explain that you’ve chosen to pursue another opportunity. The hiring manager will appreciate that you took the time to keep him or her informed and will remember your good manners. The business world is smaller than you think, so it’s very possible that you’ll cross paths again at some point, so don’t risk burning bridges.

Finally, don’t stop your job search or quit your job, no matter how well the job interview went. Nothing is official until you receive a formal job offer and sign a contract. Even if the hiring manager hints that the job is yours, another candidate may come along who is a better fit, or the manager’s manager may decide that you’re not right for the job. Any number of scenarios could occur.

It can be hard to be patient, especially if the job you interviewed for is an opportunity you’re really excited about. But, remember, patience is a virtue and proper etiquette is important.

(This article is based on “What Not to do After a Job Interview,” by Ashira Prossack, Forbes, July 2019)

Posted August 12, 2019 by

Wanted: Soft Skills that Set You Apart and Make You a Valuable Employee

Congratulations! After years of hard work, you’ve graduated and now feel confident that your education has given you the technical skills you’ll need to get the job you want. That’s great. But, lots of other graduates possess the same degree and meet the technical job requirements, so what will set you apart? What are the skills employers want?

According to a 2019 Cengage survey of hiring managers and human resources professionals, employers want college graduates who have “soft skills” as well as technical expertise. What’s more, they’re having difficulty finding candidates who possess these soft skills. Specifically, the skills employers want include:

1.The ability to listen. The most in-demand skill was the ability to listen; 74% of employers said this was a talent they valued. It doesn’t sound hard to do, but research shows that a whopping 90% of people are not good listeners! We spend far too much time practicing the art of talking and not enough time learning to really listen. Good listeners can discern the hidden meaning vs. the literal meaning. For instance, a lot of communication lies in the tone, emotional cues and body language of the speaker. To be an effective listener, you must, as they say, “read between the lines.” Listen for the tone of voice and pick up on non-verbal cues, which involves your full attention. Effective listeners also gain understanding vs. simply getting an answer to a question. Many people stop listening after they think they’ve gotten the answer they want but fail to truly understand the full meaning. Again, this requires attentiveness and, in some cases, asking for clarification or more information. Other attributes of a good listener are letting the speaker finish without interrupting, waiting for the speaker to finish before formulating a reply in your mind and listening with an open mind. There is a key difference between hearing and actually listening.

2. Good communication skills. This goes hand in hand with listening. Most problems in the workplace stem from poor communication, which is why employers place such a high value on this skill. In today’s digital age, this means solid writing and speaking skills, both in person and over the web with video conferencing and email. Clarity, grammar, spelling, enunciation and organization all play important roles in effective communication. You can begin demonstrating these skills with your cover letter and resume—and of course, during your interview.

3. Attention to detail. This is defined as “the ability to achieve thoroughness and accuracy when accomplishing a task.” Again, on the surface, this doesn’t sound that hard to achieve. However, being thorough and accurate involves planning, organization, and the ability to break down a big project into manageable steps. To demonstrate this skill, come to interviews prepared with examples of assignments or work that involved thoroughness and accuracy. (A word to the wise: If you have spelling or grammatical errors in your cover letter and/or resume, it shows that you are not paying attention to detail!).

4. Time management. No matter the industry, being efficient and meeting deadlines are important to a company’s overall performance. An employee who can manage multiple projects at a time, keep track of deadlines and use time resourcefully is a valuable asset and it allows managers to focus on more important tasks than micromanaging every employee! Start demonstrating this skill by showing up on time for interviews and then discuss projects that involved successful time management.

5. Critical thinking and problem solving. Every job comes with its own set of challenges and unexpected setbacks. How will you handle them? Companies want employees who can objectively examine information to determine the best way to solve problems. A valuable employee is one who can find creative solutions to problems and act, instead of being stymied by obstacles. Come to interviews prepared to provide examples of how you’ve successfully handled problems or implemented solutions.

While these five soft skills made the “most wanted” list, other important talents that employers are looking for include initiative, teamwork, emotional intelligence and digital literacy.

“There is a need for more soft skills training, both in college and on the job, and today’s learners and graduates must continue to hone their skills to stay ahead,” said Michael Hansen, chief executive of Cengage.

Companies can train employees in technical skills, but soft skills are much harder to teach. Therefore, by demonstrating that you possess these sought-after skills from the first touchpoint in your job search to the final interview, you can grab an employer’s attention and set yourself apart.

Sources:

  • “Survey: Employers Want ‘Soft Skills’ from Graduates,” by Jennifer Bauer-Wolf, Insidehighered.com, January 2019.
  • “7 Skills Employers Look for Regardless of the Job,” by Ashley Brooks, Rasmussen.edu, October 2018.
  • “90% of People are Poor Listeners. Are you the Remaining 10%?” by Rima Pundir, Lifehack, 2019.
Posted August 07, 2019 by

Preparation is Key to a Successful Job Search

Who was it that said, “You can never be too prepared?” Actually, a better quote is from Benjamin Franklin, who proclaimed “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” This is excellent advice for job seekers, because while a job search is a lot of work, being prepared can reduce your stress levels and increase your chances of success. So, before you start filling out applications and sending off resumes, take the time to do some work upfront.

Start with your Network

Like it or not, many positions are filled without being advertised. Networking is becoming more and more important in today’s tight job market. Think of a busy HR staff sorting through resumes and trying to fill multiple positions, when suddenly someone calls with a referral. If that referral comes from a trusted source, such as a long-time employee or associate, there is a high probability that he or she will rise to the top of the stack and eventually get the position. Statistics show that this type of informal hiring is happening more often these days. Don’t be afraid to reach out to family, friends, associates and others during your job search. Most people don’t mind lending a hand and passing along your information. If you don’t have a big network, now is the time to start building one. Join associations, attend events, and treat every interaction as a potential opportunity.

Revamp Your Resume

Everyone seems to have advice on writing the “perfect resume.” The truth is, standards for resumes change all the time. What worked a few years ago may not work in today’s market. If your resume is more than two years old, it’s time for a review and possibly a refresh. In our highly automated world, most positions require online applications, which means computers are sorting through resumes instead of humans. With that being said, content is more important than design. In fact, some of the applicant tracking software (ATS) doesn’t read serif fonts at all! Your resume should still be well-designed and easy to read but keep the format simple.

Understand How ATS Works

Speaking of software, another factor to consider in your job search is the use of keywords. ATS looks for “matches” by searching for keywords in your resume. So, for instance, if the position requires strong communication skills, management experience or certain software expertise, be sure to list those exact words on your resume. It may be more work to customize each resume you send out but being rejected by a robot is a waste of your time.

List Accomplishments First

Here’s another resume tip: Sending a common resume with a generic list of skills isn’t going to make you stand out from the crowd. For example, if you’re applying for a position as a graphic designer, there are basic requirements that every applicant must have. So, what makes you the best graphic designer? Your education is important, and so is your experience, but what really differentiates you from other applicants in the job search are your accomplishments. Did any of your designs win an award? Was your design work chosen by a group or client over other submissions? Did you exceed a client’s expectations with your work? In order to highlight your accomplishments, you must take the time to list them and decide which ones apply.

Clean up Your Social Media

I can almost hear you saying, “But that’s none of their business!” Again, like it or not, many companies Google search a candidate before hiring and take note of any red flags on social media. Anything posted on the Internet is fair game and not considered private. Prior to your job search, take some time to review your privacy settings and remove anything you think might be “questionable.” Avoid posts that may be considered overtly political or controversial.

Do your Research

This advice applies to selecting the companies you send your resume to, as well as preparing for interviews. It can be tempting to send out as many resumes as possible, hoping that the sheer quantity will boost your chances of landing a call, but it’s far more effective to apply to positions that you really want and those that fit your skill set, personality, etc. Take the time to research companies before applying and be a bit more discriminate in your job search. Once you land the interview, be sure to do your due diligence by researching the company and preparing notes and questions before the interview. You’ll feel more confident and sound more enthusiastic about the position if you’ve done your homework. That alone can make you stand out. This is especially important if you get called back for a second or even third interview.

Don’t Be Discouraged

Easier said than done, right? For the most part, being rejected for a job is not personal. It’s more often about which candidate is the best fit, which, of course, can be very subjective. Companies typically have very specific criteria in mind just as you’re looking for your dream job, they’re looking for the “perfect” employee. It’s not unusual to send out hundreds of resumes before being invited to an interview, and then attend a multitude of interviews before finding the right job. At times, your job search may seem futile and it’s easy to get discouraged. But, just remember, the right job is out there. Someone is looking for you. Really. While you’re waiting, ask people within the industry to review your resume and make some suggestions or try doing mock interviews with professionals you know to see where you can improve. Sometimes you have to take a day off and do something else entirely and start fresh. Stay positive!

Posted August 02, 2019 by

How to Use Your Disability as a Strength When Applying for a Job

Lois Barth is a Human Development Expert, Speaker, Life and Business Coach, and Author of the book, “Courage to SPARKLE; The Audacious Girls’ Guide to Creating A Life that Lights You Up.” Lois will be a panelist at the College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY on December 12th in New York City.

Did you know that bones that were broken and healed properly are stronger than bones that have never been broken at all? It’s a fact, as well as a great metaphor for those with disabilities. As a life and business coach, I often tell my clients to use that fact in an interview, not harping on the disability, but being strategic in sending the message that adapting to, and in some cases, overcoming a disability, makes them a far stronger candidate than someone who has never gone through adversity.

There are, in fact, many ways to turn a disability into a desired ability when applying for a job. Of course, it all depends on the type of disability, the position and the company culture.

Start with Some Research

There are many factors to consider about a company before applying for a job. I guide my career-coaching clients who are getting ready for an interview to think of themselves as an investigator out to solve a mystery. Begin the process by looking at the company on a broad-stroke level. What does the website tell you about the organization? You can learn a lot about the culture from the messaging, the use of buzz words (such as diversity, inclusion, team engagement), company values, charitable contributions, community involvement and recent initiatives. Additionally, pay attention to the images: Do they include photos of employees who are diverse? Do the images reflect a company that is more conservative, or one that is more progressive?

You can also Google them to discover any current or past newsworthy trends in both their industry and their organization that may impact hiring. For instance, if they just received a “Best Places to Work” award, it’s likely that their culture is positive and inclusive. On the other hand, if you find a backlash for recent marginalizing of a group, you may want to steer clear. Review sites like Glass Door can be tricky because it’s usually the employees who have extreme experiences (they either love it or hate it) that take the time to write, which means you’re not getting the full picture. You may, however, notice themes among the reviews.

Once you get a company overview, take a deeper dive into the job description. What are the primary functions? Whom are you serving? What core competencies are they looking for and is your disability an asset (it often is) or a deficit? How do you spin it to either show how your disability will make you a better candidate or at the very least, won’t hinder your performance?

Use Story-Selling to Make Your Pitch

Recently I worked with a client whose disability was fairly obvious from the get-go, but given his non-profit focus, it was an asset, because he had overcome so much to get where he is and the job that he was interviewing for was serving an underserved and neglected population. I strongly suggested that he lead with his “story-selling pitch” which was a wonderfully touching story about learning to deal with his disability, and how, in the process, he learned so much about empathy, persistence, critical thinking, and determination, all of which were desired qualities for this position. Within the story, we weaved in his hard skills that embodied a whole slew of accomplishments that were germane to the position. The interviewer became intrigued and after several interviews with board members, he was offered the job.

If your disability is blatantly obvious and may be perceived as a deficit, but nobody’s talking about it, using a well-crafted story that highlights the key qualities the employer is looking for can be very impactful. Many job descriptions list qualities such as critical thinking, determination, adaptability, and self-starter, to name just a few, that people who have successfully navigated their disability have had to develop.

However, if your disability may bring to question functionality and the ability to perform a job, then that needs to be addressed head-on. It’s best to do this in a fluid, conversational tone, using examples from the past to dispel any concerns a potential employer may have.

As a rule, I suggest candidates do more listening than talking. Ask thoughtful questions and focus on being interested versus interesting, which works for people with or without disabilities! Don’t play the disability card, but don’t try to avoid it either. Rapt attention, genuine interest, enthusiasm and energy are rare these days, which means demonstrating these qualities will take you far. Of course, you also need the hard skills to back up your competency.

Finally, don’t be afraid to bring humor to the situation. When appropriately stated, humor can go a long way to dispel any tension that may be present. It shows that you are not overly sensitive, that you have a sense of humor and humility, but you’re not ashamed of your disability. In general, people hire people they like; people whom they can relate to and trust, regardless of a disability.  

Know Your Strengths 

One of my colleagues had very intense dyslexia and ADHD. She couldn’t sit still for more than 20-30 minutes, and paperwork that should have taken 10-20 minutes took hours and was tortuous. On the positive side, she was amazing with people, could pivot on a dime, had tons of energy and loved making people feel special. She was also hilarious, passionate about health and loved helping people.

Fortunately, the health club where she was working saw her strengths and was smart enough to move her from a stifling mid-level administrative position to a sales job where she could meet and greet clients. Her people skills, creativity and natural curiosity about others, made her very good at this position and, in turn, the position made her very happy. Within the first month, she became head of sales.

Before you begin applying for positions, take a realistic assessment of your strengths: What do you bring to the potential employer? Do your abilities mesh with the job description and the qualities they value? Again, be sure to do your research on the industries, companies and jobs that provide a good fit with your unique assets.

For instance, if someone has ADD, a job that demands constant switching of tasks or mostly short-term projects takes advantage of this person’s proclivities. Meanwhile, someone with OCD may excel at a job that requires being very precise and detail oriented. For people who don’t pick up social cues and operate at their best by themselves, a strong analytic research job that requires long hours of solitary focused work may be a perfect fit. In other words, depending on the job, “alleged disabilities” may be a huge benefit.

Do Your Research. Lead with Enthusiasm. Make it About What You Can Provide.

Those are the three main takeaways when applying for any job. Remember, you may have a disability, but you are much more than your disability. You’re a whole person, with skill sets and talents that are valuable to the right employers. With every disability, there is another ability that has gotten strengthened to compensate. That’s why, even though it’s become quite PC, I do like the phrase “learning differences.” We all have challenges and we all have assets. Nobody’s exempt from the human being club that’s full of complexity and diversity. The more you embrace it as just one of the many facets of your humanity, the more you can celebrate (and sell) the one-of-a-kind gem that you are.

Lois Barth is a Human Development Expert, Speaker, Life and Business Coach, and Author of the book, “Courage to SPARKLE; The Audacious Girls’ Guide to Creating A Life that Lights You Up.” Lois supports her clients to overcome their negative self-talk, manage stress and advocate for themselves and dynamically create the next chapter of their life. She has worked with over 800 clients and on a professional level has helped them in every area from career transition, interview skills training, communication and building their business. The creator of Smart Sexy TV, she has been the makeover life coach for SELF Magazine; Fitness Magazine and Fit Blog (Sears) as well as the “Stress Less–Thrive More” Lady for C.T. Style TV (ABC Affiliate). A sought after expert, Lois has been quoted and published in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, College Recruiter, SELF Magazine, to name a few.  Her speaking clients include L’Oreal, Women in Banking, Capital One, Mid-Atlantic Women in Energy, Society of Women Engineers, and the American Heart Association to name a few. 

Join Lois Barth, along with your fellow university relations, talent acquisition and other human resource leaders from corporate, non-profit and government agencies at the:

College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY

Organized by College Recruiter and hosted by Ernst & Young

Thursday, December 12, 2019

9:30 AM – 2:30 PM (EST)

Ernst & Young World Headquarters

121 River Street

Hoboken, NJ 07030

For more information and tickets, go to: http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/BootcampOnDIatEY

Posted August 01, 2019 by

Job Search Tips to Help You Find the Right Opportunity

While there may be more job openings than qualified applicants, that doesn’t mean finding the right opportunity is easy. In fact, searching for a job is hard work! And, like any task, it requires some “best practices” to get good results. Here are some tips to help you make the most of your job search.

Broaden your scope.

Instead of simply looking at specific job titles, take the time to look at the skills the company is seeking in a candidate. Job titles can differ among industries and organizations, so why limit yourself to a title. Matching your skill set to those required for a position can ensure a better fit and provide more options including some that you may not have considered.

Decide what is non-negotiable.

More is not always better. You could send out as many applications as possible and hope for the best, or you could narrow your search to positions and companies that offer a good fit. Finding a good fit includes knowing what you’re unwilling to accept. Make a list of things that are deal breakers. For instance, you may not be able to relocate due to family obligations. How far are you willing to commute each day? Are flexible hours a nicety or a necessity? Is a positive corporate culture high on your priority list? In other words, do some research before sending out applications and start with those companies that fit the bill.

Keep good records.

Being organized can help you in several ways. First, even if you receive a rejection, there could be another opportunity at this company in the future. Or, there may be something about the job description that really resonates with you and could lead you in a new direction. Second, if you do get an interview, you will want to refer back to the job listing to prepare. Finally, if you receive specific feedback from a company, it may help you change tactics, revise your resume or improve your cover letter.

Customize your cover letter and resume.

Jobs are not one size fits all. Just as you’re looking for a job that fits you, every company is looking for the “right” candidate with specific experience, skills and personality. With that in mind, be sure to tailor your cover letter and resume for each position you apply to, highlighting the experience and skills that the employer is seeking. Also, if you’re working off a form letter or template, be sure to double check that all the names are correct before sending it!

Prepare for the interview.

Don’t just show up. Remember, you’re trying to set yourself apart from other candidates, so come prepared with information about the industry, the company, the position, and if possible, the person you are interviewing with. Doing your homework will not only make you feel more confident, it will also demonstrate your enthusiasm for the job and your willingness to go the extra mile.

Have questions ready.

Most people will wrap up an interview by asking the candidate if he/she has questions about the company or position. A surprising number of interviewees don’t come prepared with questions and fumble needlessly to think of something to ask (especially when you may already be nervous). Stand out from the pack by preparing a few thoughtful questions in advance. This is also a great opportunity to learn more about the company, it’s culture and the position. For some great questions to consider, read “8 Questions Job Seekers Should Ask.” https://www.collegerecruiter.com/blog/2019/07/01/8-interview-questions-job-seekers-should-ask/

Don’t forget to respond.

Manners matter! Always send a thank you note within a day or two of your interview. Make sure it reflects your enthusiasm about the position by sharing why you’re excited about the company and the job. To keep the conversation going, you can ask another pertinent question. Also, it’s a good idea to let some of your personality shine through instead of sending a standard, formal thank you note. After all, you want them to remember you!

(This article was adapted from “10 Job Search Tips to Help You Find Your Best Opportunity Every Time, by Nina Zipkin, Entrepreneur, 2010.)

College Recruiter is the leading job search site used by students and recent graduates of all 7,400+ one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities who are searching for internships, part-time jobs, seasonal work, and entry-level career opportunities. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other employers who want to hire dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year. Our mission is to connect great organizations with students and recent graduates.

Posted July 29, 2019 by

Here’s How We Make Productivity the Result, Not the Goal

As founder and CEO of Journeous, which helps young adults choregraph meaningful careers, Pam Baker will be bringing 20+ years of hiring, managing, mentoring and coaching expertise Join us for the College Recruiting Bootcamp on Diversity and Inclusion.)

“Motivation is the art of getting people to do what you want them to do because they want to do it.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower

What motivates you? As someone dedicated to supporting those starting their journey, along with the organizations they work for, to make the most of what each of us brings to the world, I understand the importance of motivation. Yet, I was reminded recently of how different motivators can be for each person.

The first reminder came during lunch with a former colleague – someone I respect immensely who I’d feel fortunate to call a teammate once again. She’d recently started a new job at a hot tech company and despite the majority of MBA students I mentor expressing an interest in working there, she was flabbergasted by its lack of vision and focus. They’re a typical Silicon Valley tech company offering free lunch, ping pong tables and no expectation that anyone ever tucks in a shirt.

She couldn’t understand why people were clamoring to work there. With little leadership grit or direction, she equally couldn’t relate to why people wanted to stay. As I looked around the lunch area, though, it hardly looked like a bunch of demotivated and disengaged employees. The ping pong table was in use, and there was lots of animated chatter and laughter around us. I’ve been around checked out people. This was not such a group.

Winning is Motivation… For Some

My twin daughters provided a second reminder. They’d both played defense on the same soccer team, which ended up winning a total of one game during the season. As I drove them home after their last game, I asked them what they’d thought of the season. I looked in the rearview mirror to see one scrunching up her face and looking at me as if I’d asked the stupidest question possible (experience seeing that face a few dozen times now has helped me decode it). She grumbled, “It sucked. We only won one game all season.” My other daughter looked at her, then at me and said, “I thought it was great.” And then they looked at each other with their expressions seeming to say, “What team are YOU talking about?”

Same team, same position, same games attended, roughly the same playing time. But their motivators were entirely different. One wanted to win. Sure, she liked her team members, but she was driven to get better personally and as a team. The other wanted to be outside and be part of a team of girls she likes.

Their motivation for practicing was different: One wanted to get better, while the other wanted to be outside with her friends. Their motivation for games was also different: One wanted to see the result of her hard work at practice pay off with a win, while the other just wanted to be outside with her friends. Finally, as the season wound on with the losses piling up, their motivation for continuing was different: One because she knew she was getting better and could contribute to bringing the team up in the standings, while the other (you guessed it) could still be outside with her friends. She never even noticed what their team record was.

“Motivation will almost always beat mere talent.” – Norman Ralph Augustine

At my friend’s company, no doubt some were motivated by the company’s status. Others were driven by the freedom and flexibility. Still others by the occasional fun that was injected into their day since ping pong tables appeared to be as ubiquitous as bathrooms.

Leaders, and of course all of us are leaders in some capacity at work and home, must learn to understand and appreciate the differences in what motivates people, including ourselves. When we do, we unlock the key to staying engaged and motivated, as well as motivating those around us – in both easy and stressful situations.

Thankfully, there’s a science behind each of our motivations and needs. It might be the recognition of our work, of our convictions, or of who we are as an individual. It may involve giving us space and solitude, allowing for playful interactions, or incorporating action and excitement in our day.

Knowing and acting on the science behind our motivational needs keeps us from missing out on the talents of those around us. Improved productivity is the result (not the goal) and these diverse perspectives, talents and approaches then quickly become our most valued assets.

Join Pam Baker, along with your fellow university relations, talent acquisition and other human resource leaders from corporate, non-profit and government agencies at the:

College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY
Organized by College Recruiter and hosted by Ernst & Young
Thursday, December 12, 2019
9:30 AM – 2:30 PM (EST)
Ernst & Young World Headquarters
121 River Street
Hoboken, NJ 07030

For more information and tickets go to: http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/BootcampOnDIatEY

Pam Baker is Founder and CEO of Journeous, which empowers participants with new tools to dig in and find answers to complex questions like, “What are my personal values and how might they relate to my career?” Pam founded Journeous after a 20-year healthcare career spent building, leading and mentoring teams where she saw firsthand the challenge – for herself and colleagues – of creating fulfilling careers. Without understanding what was meaningful, though, it was easy to end up in jobs that didn’t click. As a mom of two daughters, Pam’s goal is to change the pattern for today’s young adults to help them choreograph meaningful careers.

The mission of Journeous is to prepare those starting a new journey and the organizations they work with to make the most of what each of us brings to the world. They provide your students and employees the tools to design a meaningful career and to thrive by mastering the art of adaptive communication.

To learn more, visit https://www.journeous.com/

Posted July 26, 2019 by

Join Us In Latin America For The Marketplacebuzz Conference

Minneapolis, MN – July 23, 2019 – College Recruiter, a leading job search site used by students and recent graduates, is proud to be participating in the upcoming MarketplacesBuzz conference. The conference will be held at the Maksoud Hotel in Sao Paulo, Brazil on November 6-7, 2019.

Join senior leaders from across Latin America (LatAm) and other parts of the world, from the automotive industry, real estate, recruitment and horizontal marketplaces, as well as investors and suppliers to the industry. The conference offers a unique opportunity to network, brainstorm and learn about trends and challenges impacting marketplace and classified ad businesses.

“Our founder, Steven Rothberg, and I look forward to sharing how the College Recruiter job search site is successfully migrating from traditional, duration- to performance-based pricing,” said Faith Rothberg, Chief Executive Officer. “A lot of media, including job boards, see this transformation as an existential threat because they can’t fathom selling clicks for $0.25 instead of postings for $200. Our experience, however, has been the opposite. Instead of selling thousands of postings, we sell hundreds of thousands. Instead of generating hundreds to thousands of dollars each month per employer customers, we can generate thousands to tens of thousands of dollars¾and employers are happier as we’re helping them hire more people faster.”

Attendees can expect:

  • Keynotes that cover the big trends and issues, such as facing and embracing disruption; moving closer to the transaction; the specific challenges of Latam markets, finding investments and more.
  • Breakout sessions for automotive, real estate and recruitment, focusing on vertical revenue-building strategies, case studies, smart use of data and technology and best practices for each industry.
  • Networking, which is the core of the MarketplacesBuzz conferences. Meet your Latam and global peers during breaks and evening events, and exchange ideas through the conference app and moderated expert tables.

A similar conference will be held in Dubai on January 22-23, 2020, which will address issues of emerging markets in the Middle East, Europe, Africa and Asia.   

“Billions of dollars are being invested in marketplace and classified companies throughout Latin America and the EMEA regions. Companies need to learn from leaders in those industries, while investors are looking for opportunities and startups are looking for investors,” said AIM Group founding principal Peter M. Zollman. “These events will deliver unique networking opportunities and world-class content to help those companies reach their potential.”

Registration and information on both conferences is available at: https://marketplacebuzz.com

About College Recruiter

College Recruiter is the leading job search site used by students and recent graduates of all 7,400+ one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities who are searching for internships, part-time jobs, seasonal work, and entry-level career opportunities. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other employers who want to hire dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year. Our mission is to connect great organizations with students and recent graduate

About AIM Group

The AIM Group is a world-class business intelligence consultancy focused on digital marketplaces and classified advertising. We work with classified ad publishers, marketplaces, investors, technology vendors, media companies and other businesses on strategic and operational challenges. We’re a global team of more than 30 experts who follow changes in the marketplace and classified advertising industry more closely and in greater depth than anyone else. We publish AIM Group Marketplaces Report, formerly called Classified Intelligence Report, often referred to as “the bible of the classified advertising industry.”

Jon Kestenbaum, Talent Tech Labs

Posted July 26, 2019 by

Find The Right Paid Interns With Targeted Job Postings

Sometimes the simplest solutions are the most effective. Case in point, when Talent Tech Labs* wanted to hire two paid interns, they tried posting the positions on a number of job boards with disappointing results. Frustrated by the lack of response, they asked College Recruiter for a recommendation.

Simple but Effective

Because Talent Tech Labs wanted to hire two students or recent graduates, versus dozens or hundreds of candidates, our team suggested using a $75, 30-day job posting ad. As part of our standard implementation, the posting included their logo and YouTube video at no additional cost. Studies show that the quantity and quality of candidate responses greatly increase when employers include at least one of these elements in their postings. 

According to Jonathon Kestenbaum, Managing Director of Talent Tech Labs, “Although we posted the same job on a bunch of job boards, half of all the applicants we received and both hires came from College Recruiter. We couldn’t have been more pleased with the results.”

Targeting Makes the Difference

We attribute this success to the fact that College Recruiter’s audience is exclusively college students and recent graduates. By targeting the right candidates, employers can maximize their budgets, while improving response.

Because we work with companies of all sizes, we know that the recruiting needs of every organization is unique. Not every employer has the resources to use multiple recruiting tools and plaster their job postings on every available job board. That’s why our targeted approach is more effective for small- to mid-sized companies. We’ve found that many smaller employers are looking for candidates that have recently graduated and trying to find their first or second job or students seeking internships, which is our sweet spot!

And because our online job posting process is fully automated, it’s quick and easy. In other words, you don’t need an entire human resources team to get the job filled.

Making Great Connections

Of course, we offer more than simple job postings. College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great part-time, seasonal, internship or entry-level job, which is why our interactive media solutions, including job postings, are designed specifically to make great connections between college students or recent grads and employers.

“We view every client, big or small, as a valuable partner,” noted Faith Rothberg, Chief Executive Officer, College Recruiter. “Whether you want the value and ease of online postings, or customized, interactive solutions, we believe in creating a great candidate and recruiter experience and we’re passionate about customer service. That’s why we go the extra mile to offer free company logo placement and YouTube videos with our online job postings, while many other job boards charge extra.”

Start filling those open positions today with targeted online job postings that get results! Get started and post your job HERE. (link to pricing page on CR website).

College Recruiter is the leading job search site used by students and recent graduates of all 7,400+ one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities who are searching for internships, part-time jobs, seasonal work, and entry-level career opportunities. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other employers who want to hire dozens, hundreds, or thousands of students and recent graduates per year. Our mission is to connect great organizations with students and recent graduates.

About Talent Tech Labs

Talent Tech Labs is on a mission to elevate the state of the art in recruitment technology and bring innovation to the world of talent acquisition software. Based in New York City and Palo Alto, Talent Tech Labs brings the language of vendors like College Recruiter together with the language of employers and other buyers to help vendors, buyers, analysts and practitioners understand what these tools do, how they solve business problems and where each falls in the acquisition process. In essence, Talent Tech Labs provides a structure that allows everyone to look at TA technology through the same lens and learn how these tools practically solve actual recruitment problems.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted July 18, 2019 by

New, free job search engine for career service office and other sites from College Recruiter

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career.

About 2.5 million students and recent graduates of one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities use our website a year to find part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs. They do so at no charge. Our revenues come from employers who pay to advertise the jobs with us. 

Do you have students who search your site but don’t find a lot of jobs which match their interests, perhaps because they grew up in another state and want to find a job back there? Just have your web developer drop this code onto your resource page or wherever your students would go to search for a job:


<!– begin iframe-board –>
<div class=”iframe-board”>
<iframe style=”width: 100%; height: 800px;” src=”https://cr.careersitecloud.com/” frameborder=”0″></iframe>
</div>
<!– end iframe-board –>

Your students will have instant access to thousands of internships and entry-level jobs. They can search by category, location, keywords, and even sign up to get new jobs emailed to them. When they see jobs of interest, they’ll click the ones of interest and go straight to the employer’s website to apply. To be clear: they will not be sent to College Recruiter or any other job search site.

There’s no fee to add this new feature to your site, which should make it far easier for your students to find the jobs they want. What we get out of it will be more candidates going to the jobs advertised by our employer customers, which will make them happier and that will, in the long run, make us happier.

Want to see what the search looks like. Here you go!

Posted July 18, 2019 by

Community College Graduates: An Overlooked Sweet Spot

Community College Graduates: An Overlooked Sweet Spot

When you say the word “college,” most people automatically think of four-year institutions that award degrees in traditionally white-collar fields like marketing, accounting, journalism or human resources. When you’ve earned that college degree, you’ve got your golden ticket to prestige and (hopefully) a good-paying job.

On the other hand, talk about community colleges and the stereotypes kick in: “It’s just a cheap way to get your basic classes in.” “They’re for students who can’t get into real colleges.” “Easy way to pull a 4.0.” “You know, the teachers aren’t real professors—they have day jobs.” “All the degrees are useless these days.”

Let’s quash those stereotypes now. Long derided as the last bastion of education for disappearing industries like manufacturing, the fact is community colleges are adapting to changes in today’s workforce at an admirable rate. Today’s students leave community college prepared for their future careers, both specific and translatable to a number of other fields.

To give you an idea of the types of programs being offered these days, here are just some of the associate degree offerings available at Washtenaw Community College in Ann Arbor, Michigan:

  • Engineering Technologist – Manufacturing
  • Welding Technology
  • Automotive Service Technology
  • Powertrain Development Technician
  • Accounting
  • Business Office Administration (Administrative Assistant or Law Office Administration)
  • Management
  • Retail Management
  • Supply Chain Management
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Child Development
  • Construction Management
  • Construction Technology
  • Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
  • Criminal Justice
  • Paralegal Studies/Pre-Law
  • Criminal Justice – Law Enforcement
  • Baking and Pastry Arts and Management
  • Culinary Arts and Management
  • Digital Video Production
  • 3D Animation Arts
  • Graphic Design
  • Photographic Technology
  • Web Design and Development
  • Computer Science: Programming in Java
  • Information Systems: Programming in C++
  • Computer Systems and Networking
  • Cybersecurity
  • Nursing – RN and LPN
  • Physical Therapist Assistant
  • Radiography
  • Surgical Technology
  • Broadcast Media Arts
  • Journalism
  • Technical Communication

This list doesn’t even include the many transfer programs for students who plan to continue their education at a four-year college—or remain at the campus to finish their bachelor’s degree through one of the many community college-university partnerships available these days.

It also doesn’t include the dozens of certificate and advanced certificate programs available to students and professionals for continuing education. And depending on the size of the institution, many community colleges offer other types of programs for ever-in-demand professions like emergency medical services, diagnostic medical sonography, respiratory therapy, civil technology, plumbing, fire science and much more.

The next time you update your recruiting plan, be sure to include community colleges. Especially since a major segment of students are 25 years and older (7.6 million students in 2018, according to the National Center of Education Statistics) you may very well be pleasantly surprised at how easily graduates’ education and skills translate to the positions you’re looking to fill.

Sources:

https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=372