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Posted March 19, 2016 by

6 part-time jobs for college students in 2016

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Are you a college student who needs a little bit of extra money? Sometimes, students can find a work-study position or other type of on-campus job, but those are sometimes few and far between, especially at colleges with large student bodies. If students haven’t found jobs on campus they like, it’s time to look elsewhere. Fortunately, there are a number of great part-time jobs out there college students are ideally suited for. Here are six highly remunerative part-time jobs college students may be interested in.

1. Non-profit charity fundraiser

Charities are always looking for young people to help them out, especially in the fundraising department. This type of job often entails manning donation tables at various events, which means college students are going to be talking to a lot of people. They’ll need to be able to memorize facts about the charity and who it helps, be personable, and be able to smile and chat for hours. It’s not a job for introverts, but for those who are outgoing and want to gain experience working for nonprofits, it’s a great option. It also pays well—students can make up to $30/hour!

2. Social media assistant

Everyone is on some form of social media these days, but not everyone has mastered it. Some small business owners don’t even have time to really develop their social media because they’re so busy handling everything else, and they don’t have the money to hire someone full-time. However, many can budget money for a part-time social media assistant. If college students love Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms and don’t mind putting in the time to learn how to truly harness these sites for a business, then this is a great job for them. It can pay as much as $21/hour.

3. Academic tutor

If college students are peculiarly sharp in one particular subject area, they might want to offer their services as academic tutors to other students. Sometimes, these jobs are available through the university, but there’s nothing stopping them from doing private tutoring. Students will need to be sure they thoroughly understand the subject, and know how to explain it to others. They will be able to set their own rate and schedule, which is nice, but there’s no guarantee being a tutor will be steady work. Tutors make anything from $15 to $30 a tutoring session, but the rate and the length of each session has to be negotiated.

4. Freelance content writer

Many websites, blogs, and online publications are in need of content, and while some do have writers on staff, many look to freelance writers for new content. College students can find a number of these jobs online, and many don’t require much experience in writing, as long as they can show them a few well-written sample articles. Their pay will be negotiated on a case-by-case basis. Sometimes, students will be paid per word, while other clients may want to set a flat rate per article. On the upside, they’ll be able to work when they want and can do so from home.

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5. Office assistant

It may not sound glamorous, but being an office assistant is a good, steady job for college students. Students get to see first-hand how an office environment works, and the skills they develop can be useful in their own careers. Here are some of the tasks they may do as an office assistant:

• Answer the phones

• Do filing and organization

• Do light computer work

• Schedule appointments

• Assist employees with various tasks as needed

Students’ duties may vary depending on where they work, but those listed are fairly common. Through the job, they may learn about various computer problems, organizational methods, and more. During off-job hours, students can easily stay connected with their customers via cloud phone systems. If they get office assistant jobs at a business in their fields, they may even be able to turn their part-time gigs into full-time jobs when they graduate.

6. Guest services coordinator

A guest services coordinator assists customers with all of their needs. They may do returns, help customers find products, or do special orders in a retail setting. However, guest services can be found in many different industries. Some may actually do more office work, while others may work in support roles. No matter what industry students are working in, however, they’ll be dealing with customers, so this is another job in which being a people person is a must. It’s possible to make as much as $21 in one of these positions.

Want to learn more about different jobs, visit College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Sandra Lambert

Sandra Lambert, guest writer

Sandra Lambert is a CISCO certified computer networking specialist. She has a keen interest in writing about her knowledge and experiences. She writes about technology as well as about business. She has also developed interest in public speaking. You can follow her on Google+ and Twitter.

Posted February 23, 2016 by

4 ways to overcome lack of experience

Have you ever interviewed for a job and been rejected because of your lack of work experience?

When you’re applying for entry-level jobs or internships as a college student or recent grad, this is a pretty common experience. Even though the career services office on your campus may have barked at you incessantly about applying for internships and part-time job opportunities, and your parents breathed down your neck over break about doing seasonal work to make some extra money, you may find yourself with very little work experience to list on your resume at this point.

If that’s the case, today’s Tuesday Tip video and article are for you. College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, offers four quick tips in a 5-minute video.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Lack experience? Get some.

Alanis Morissette should have added this to her lyrical list of ironies back in 1995. Recruiters don’t have much sympathy for job seekers without experience listed on their resumes, though. If you lack experience prior to the job search, the best remedy is to seek experience. The sooner you can gain experience, the better.

The worst thing you can do for yourself is to allow yourself the luxury of feeling bad about your lack of experience. The best thing you can do for yourself is to take action. A great first step is to register at CollegeRecruiter.com and search for job opportunities in your area.

2. List all experience.

If you can’t find a full-time job, settle for part-time employment. Combine a few part-time jobs if necessary. It’s best to find part-time employment in your preferred career field, of course, because this allows you to build a repertoire of skills you can use in that great entry-level full-time job you’ll land soon.

If you can’t find a paid part-time position, consider volunteering with a non-profit organization. You might be able to use the skills gained in your academic major to help the organization; this experience can be listed on your resume as well.

Don’t forget to list other experience on your resume as well, including paid and unpaid internships and your involvement in organizations both on-campus and off-campus.

3. Compensate with strong soft skills.

Soft skills are skills which you may have acquired as a college student (but not necessarily in the classroom); these skills are a combination of personality traits and habits which make you a quality employee and a pleasant person to interact with. Research shows that people with excellent soft skills tend to perform well at work; in fact, people with strong soft skills perform just as well (and sometimes better than) people with strong technical skills.

Some of the soft skills recruiters and talent acquisition professionals are looking for including communication skills, a strong work ethic, time management ability, problem-solving skills, and ability to work well under pressure.

When you’re in an interview, think about how you can sell yourself by demonstrating your soft skills. Think in advance how you would answer questions like, Tell me about a time when you faced a difficult problem. How did you solve it?

4. Seek additional training opportunities.

If you lack training which applies to the job opportunities you’re seeking, get some! There are multiple ways to seek training. You can take an extra college course in journalism, for example, if you want to write for your local newspaper but keep getting rejected when you apply for writing positions. You might also scour the internet and newspapers for local writers groups. These groups are free to join, and not only will you learn from other writers, but you might enjoy the fellowship and constructive criticism.

Ultimately, if you lack experience related to your career field, no one can gain it on your behalf.

It’s your responsibility to stake your claim in the world of work.

Taking steps in the direction of gaining work experience can be intimidating, but you’ll feel a sense of accomplishment each time you take one more step.

Why not take one more step forward today?

Work on the draft of your resume. Submit your final draft to the free resume editors at College Recruiter. Make an appointment with the career services department at your local university. Find out when the career fair will be hosted on your campus this spring. Register and search for jobs on College Recruiter’s website.

For more Tuesday Tips, subscribe to College Recruiter’s YouTube Channel, follow our blog, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

 

 

Posted May 06, 2015 by

How to Prevent the Bug of Plagiarism in College Students?

Stop Plagiarism red sign with sun background

Stop Plagiarism red sign with sun background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Let us discuss why and how college and university going students are entangled in this concept which is discouraged and dejected by every educational facility.

Content

Plagiarism is considered totally unethical but let us be honest, how many of us have not performed this unscrupulous activity in the years of our college? Similarly, five out of every ten students perform this activity in their schools, high schools or even colleges. But what drives them towards this immoral and corrupt practice? Why do they plagiarize material when they have their own neurons working within their mind? It is their lethargy! Students do not want to compete and participate, they avoid and run from hard work and fail to develop the understanding of mental exertion. For them, success has to be achieved from the easy path with no effort and struggle. Young students, for example, in their early school or high school years take help from this concept, by totally copying and pasting the material for their own good. They do not understand that this concept is totally scandalous and not appreciated by the professionals. We can start by highlighting the negativity of plagiarism; some students do not even understand and realize what plagiarism is. For them it is just taking help from the online available articles by copying the exact words and sentences. They should be taught that repetition and replication of data without citing the correct sources is stealing. Even the college and university going students who are mature enough to understand the concept, perform the same activity, intentionally or unintentionally. That is why, a new system of checks and balance has been introduced which is known as the plagiarism detection software. Different international education related organizations have initiated the concept and this has been, since then used by various schools and colleges. Let us talk about this new resolution and its elements. (more…)

Posted February 26, 2015 by

Six Lucrative Career Paths for Liberal Arts Majors

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Graphic designer. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Despite what you may have heard, there are many great liberal arts careers to choose from that pay very well. As many students know, settling on a career path as an undergrad can be tough, especially for one pursuing a liberal arts degree. To help, below are six of the most lucrative career paths for liberal arts students. (more…)

Posted February 16, 2015 by

8 Best Career Options for Skilled Writers

Woman writer in her home with laptop in creative process

Woman writer in her home with laptop in creative process. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Not all good writers wind up writing the latest new stories or best-selling novels. The notion that those jobs are the only kind out there for professional writers is wide off the mark. In fact, many professional writers of today are into other gigs that are quite lucrative and well-paying.

So, are you one of those passion-filled newbies looking forward to exploring the many lucrative opportunities for today’s skilled writers? Read on to find out the best writing career options that are not only reputable, but also well-paying. (more…)

Posted May 28, 2014 by

Class of 2014: Top-Paid Liberal Arts Majors

Concept of learning English

Concept of learning English. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Some liberal arts graduates in the class of 2014 have the chance to earn good starting salaries once they land jobs.  Find out the top paid majors in this field in the following post.

Majors in languages and literature were the top-paid among class of 2014 liberal arts graduates at the bachelor’s degree level, according to results of a recent survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). (more…)