ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 11, 2019 by

5 Things to Consider Besides Salary

5 Things to Consider Besides Salary

Of course, it’s important to earn a living wage. And, while a great salary may top your “wish list” when job hunting, there are other important factors to consider. In fact, some aspects of a potential job can have a much greater impact on your overall satisfaction and long-term happiness than a paycheck. For instance, if you have children or crave work-life balance, flexible hours may be a significant benefit. If you love to travel, more vacation days can help you pursue your dreams.

Surveys show that employees rate the following factors as “extremely to very important” when deciding on a position.          

1. Interesting and/or challenging work, with room to grow.

In a 2018 poll by Korn Ferry of nearly 5,000 professionals, the top reason people were looking for a new job was boredom. That’s right they were bored! If you think about how many hours you spend at work, you can see how continually doing mundane tasks can take its toll over time. Most people want to be engaged in their job and challenged by new experiences. Based on interviews with employees at companies that have been designated as the Best Places to Work, “Doing things that I enjoy and am good at” ranked as the number one reason for loving their job. Having “learning or growth opportunities” was also rated highly. In addition, the Society for Human Resource Management found that 59% of employees think that opportunity for personal growth and advancement was a very important job aspect.

Furthermore, nearly 60% of Americans would take a job they love over a job they hate, even if the preferred position paid half the amount of salary they would earn at the job they dislike! (Lexington Law)

So, as you consider prospective positions, be sure the job responsibilities include tasks that truly interest you. Not every aspect of a job can be exciting, or even interesting, but overall, the position should entail something you enjoy doing and excel at. Also, be sure to ask about opportunities for continued training and growth, which will not only challenge you, but may result in a bigger paycheck down the road.

2. Organizational culture.

It goes without saying that a company with a toxic or dysfunctional culture is not going to be a great place to work. Not surprisingly, research shows that a negative atmosphere can reduce productivity and increase turnover, while a positive culture can improve performance, attract and retain employees and make a company more competitive.

While there has been a great deal of momentum around changing the face of corporate cultures over the past 10 years, Gallup’s “State of the American Workplace” report reveals that only 33% of employees in the U.S. rated their workplace culture as positive or engaging. There is obviously room for improvement.

Start by looking for a company that has taken the time to develop a mission statement and a set of values and that actually puts them into practice. In short, a mission outlines what a company stands for and defines its purpose. According to Forbes, mission-driven employees are 54% more likely to stay for five or more years at a company and 30% are more likely to become high performers. In summary, a great work environment can boost morale, motivate you, and enhance your quality of life.

“Culture” shouldn’t just be a buzzword for the company. And, it doesn’t always mean that the company has ping-pong tables and meditation rooms! A positive company culture is one that encourages teamwork and collaboration; offers opportunities for growth; and places a high value on its employees. They may also serve the community and encourage employee participation in that outreach. In short, there is no single rubric for company culture. However, you can get a sense of whether that culture is a good fit for you by researching the company, asking questions in the interview process, looking for comments on social media and, if possible, talking to other employees.

3. Accessible leadership.

Although this often goes along with a positive culture, having access to leaders and developing good working relationships with them is key to employee satisfaction. According to the Harvard Business Review, 60% of employees surveyed said their relationships with their supervisor or manager positively impacts their focus and productivity at work and 44% said it impacts their stress levels, leading to higher productivity and satisfaction overall.

Accessible leadership makes employees feel valued. It involves listening to employees and making them feel heard, acknowledging their feedback and doing something about it, recognizing employees for a job well done and giving credit where credit is due.

It can be difficult to get a feel for the leadership of a company prior to working there, but you can ask questions about reviews and feedback opportunities during an interview. In these days of social media, you can also often find comments from employees. Other indicators: Has the company been named as one of the best companies to work for? Have the company’s leaders received recognition for their direction?

4. Open communication/transparency.

Transparency and open communication fosters trust, and employees who trust organizations are more likely to be engaged in their everyday work life (TalMetrix). This makes sense when you consider that we are all more likely to trust someone when we feel they will share necessary information with us. Again, open communication is a big component of a positive company culture, but it’s important enough to be considered separately.

Some aspects that contribute to open communication and transparency are annual performance reviews, keeping employees informed about company performance on a regular basis, clearly communicating the company’s mission and values, creating an atmosphere where employees can voice concerns or make suggestions without fear of repercussions, and holding team-building activities.

Again, you can get a feel for a company’s communication style by asking questions during an interview about how often reviews are done and whether there is a forum for employee feedback. Companies that value open communication will also typically communicate this well on their website.

5. Employee health and work-life balance.

The 2018 Global Talent Trends study by Mercer revealed that a large number of employees value flexible schedules more than salary. Flexibility was more important for parents, with 84% naming it the number one factor to consider in a job. Meanwhile 80% of surveyed employees said work-life balance was the most significant factor. Of course, the two are closely related.

In today’s digital world, it’s much easier for companies to allow flexible work schedules as many jobs can be accomplished anywhere via computer. Remote workers are, in fact, a growing population.

In addition to flex hours and respect for work-life balance, employees who are most satisfied with their job site “wellness initiatives” as important. Companies that promote and encourage healthy habits show that they care about employees as people. The Global Talent Trends study found that 50% of employees would like to see a greater focus on well-being at their company, including physical, psychological and financial wellness.

Companies that are committed to the health and wellbeing of their employees often offer a variety of wellness programs, such as on-site health screenings, lunch and learn sessions, on-site gyms, mental health days, standing desks, and more. Typically, these programs are featured on their websites or other recruiting materials.

What do you value? This is the question you need to ask before embarking on your job search. While there is no guarantee, finding a company that shares those values is more likely to lead to long-term job satisfaction. 

Posted May 23, 2018 by

Do you dread going to work every day? You don’t have to.

 

We spend about a third of our adult lives at work. That’s a big slice of your time, but is work more a source of pain or pleasure for you?

According to a recent Gallup poll, about 70% of people surveyed in the United States (compared to 85% worldwide) indicate that they “hate” their jobs. This is a huge waste of time and talent if you are among this very high percentage.

Let’s explore how you can avoid falling into a trap of staying at a job that you dread! (more…)

Posted March 08, 2018 by

Career guidance: Four keys to getting your career off to a great start

 

Congratulations, you landed a job out of college! You’ve launched your career, but to make sure you keep going in the direction you want, keep your eyes on the ball. You (not your employer) are the owner of your career. I learned a few lessons early in my career that I share that career guidance here. Things worked out alright for me, but looking back I believe the following four points can increase your chances of starting off in the right direction and excelling in your chosen career. (more…)

Posted November 17, 2017 by

Workplace culture of happiness and leadership: How Whole Foods retains entry-level employees

 

One of the core values at Whole Foods Market is “team member happiness.” Making team members happy doesn’t happen by accident. Melissa Simpson, Talent Acquisition Manager, spoke with us about how their workplace culture is designed to keep employees engaged and to develop them into leaders.

Melissa Simpson will be joining other leaders in HR, talent acquisition and university relations at the College Recruiting Bootcamp on December 15. Simpson has deep insight into filling and moving the pipeline from entry-level to leadership, and we look forward to hearing more of her thoughts and questions at the event! To join us and hear what strategies and tactics you might not have considered yet to attract and retain entry-level talent, register for the bootcamp here. (more…)

Posted December 23, 2016 by

Fiat Chrysler has award winning candidate experience

Award winnerCongratulations to the 50 winners of the Candidate Experience Awards! Among the winners is Fiat Chrysler Automotive. This is what they have to say on their website what it’s like to work there.

 

INNOVATION

It’s a dynamic, challenging climate we work in. To stay ahead in the automotive industry, you need to embrace change, cherish competition and think bigger. BOLDER. And that’s what we expect from every member of the FCA team, in every role. It takes a nimble company to compete in the global marketplace and, today, our products are sold in more than 120 countries around the world. You’ll find FCA a fast-paced work environment—one that will keep you challenged and growing from day one.

LEADERSHIP

You’ll work with people who exemplify the entrepreneurial spirit, act with integrity and are accountable for delivering what they promise. We’ll make sure you have the chance to prove yourself right from the start, and ongoing opportunities to make an impact. We are a meritocracy. How far and how fast you grow in your career is yours to own. You’ll get the freedom to think for yourself, the encouragement to share your ideas and the rewards to make it worth your while.

PASSION

Here, we don’t look at the product we produce as simply a car or a truck or a minivan. These are truly labors of love. To us, every design, every piece of engineering, every new technology that makes up our offering represent opportunities to innovate…explore…invent. You can apply yourself in ways you never imagined at FCA. The energy is dynamic.

COOPERATION

We may be independent thinkers, but we’re a team at FCA, committed to treating everyone with dignity and fairness. We’ll expect you to bring—and voice—your point of view. You’ll work with people from different countries, different backgrounds and different disciplines who offer totally different perspectives. And we know that embracing our differences makes us stronger, more innovative and more in tune with the needs of our global client base.

RESPONSIBILITY

As a responsible corporate citizen, we invest in our communities…help build a safe, sustainable environment for future generations…and encourage and promote the workforce of the future through education programs. We’re also committed to our team members. We respect each other’s roles and support each other’s growth.

 

 

Posted November 24, 2016 by

Spectrum Health has award winning candidate experience

Award winnerCongratulations to the 50 winners of the Candidate Experience Awards! Among those winners is Spectrum Health. Here’s what they have to say on their LinkedIn page:

Why West Michigan?

Our partner Hello West Michigan describes the region best: Alluring sunsets, cities bursting with outdoor sculpture, intriguing architecture, dozens of schools and universities, festivals, award-winning orchestras, theater, ballet and entertainment districts teeming with nightlife.   West Michigan’s zest for living and learning results a winning combination of cultures, age groups and beliefs that make up the kind of culturally diverse opportunities you’ll find in only one place: here.

Posted November 07, 2016 by

Creating a positive work culture

 

There is a lot of talk about the importance of organizational culture — and making sure you develop a positive one. Research by Deloitte earlier in 2016 shows it’s one of the major concerns of senior leaders across multiple industries. So, how do you create a positive work culture — especially for younger workers who will become the backbone of your talent acquisition strategy?

The first issue or concern that usually arises here is the word itself. “Culture” is fairly amorphous as a concept; it can mean different things to different people. Some want open communication from managers and a continuing sense of respect at all levels. Still others want kegerators and ping-pong tables available in lounge areas. All three of these perceptions are very different, but all could easily be called “culture” in the eyes of different employees.

Entire books have been written on this topic; heck, entire sections of bookstores have been written on this topic, in reality. It can’t be solved in one blog post, but here are some places to begin:

Care: You need to care about culture as a real strategic element in your business. If you only care about money and making as much of it as possible, fine. Good luck balancing that with staff retention. 

Bring culture outside of HR. Too often, culture discussions are housed in Human Resources. This makes sense on one level as they tend to own personnel matters, but your culture can’t be a series of HR-initiated documents. The sheer term “culture” refers to daily actions all over a company; this sense of culture needs to be be owned by different teams and levels, not just HR. A good example of mutual ownership with solid results is Dreamworks, where managers encourage increased responsibilities and often engage in spontaneous discussions with employees about what they think. Dreamworks’ feature films have grossed $13.48 billion worldwide, with an average of about $421.4 million per film. While there’s not a direct causation between internal management style and external results, the correlation is likely quite strong.

Core values: One way that can happen is by working together to set core values. By “working together” here, we mean cross-silos. We also mean that employees get to weigh in on core values as the company grows, as opposed to them just being set by the highest leadership levels. Netflix, which has become a highly-successful company financially, is a good example of a process around setting core values together. These core values, once set, can’t be a static document — they need to be lived (by as many people as possible) and adjusted annually, if not quarterly.

Perks determination: Part of a good work culture is perks, whether that’s a kegerator or every other Friday off or something else. Work from senior leadership to finance/accounting to HR to determine what perks are possible and fiscally viable. Create a list of potential perks and poll your employees. The top three vote-getters become a series of perks in the short-term. Revisit the idea in six months and see how it’s going. Scripps Health in San Diego is particularly good at this; for example, their bonus pool is filtered (relatively) equally throughout the organization, as opposed to just the higher ranks. They also offer tuition reimbursement, on-site massage, and pet insurance.

Priority alignment: In terms of the actual work that needs to be done, make sure there’s priority alignment around what needs to be done and in what order. Many companies, even very fiscally successful ones, are quite bad at this. Usually, poor priority alignment creates a lot of competing, urgent projects for employees. This ultimately burns them out, which increases turnover. High turnover runs directly counter to a good culture, because if people are constantly in and out, a culture can’t really emerge. You want to keep turnover down, and priority alignment is one major approach to doing so. So who does this well? Many companies, including ARM — which makes microprocessors for 95 percent of the world’s smart devices. (You’ve never heard of them, but they’re very important to your daily life.) ARM designs priority alignment around innovation, making sure everyone knows what to work on — and when — in the interest of potential collaborations and new project growth.

Managerial training: We’ve all heard the old adage — “People leave managers, not jobs.” That’s largely true. Here’s a not-so-good statistic: 82 percent of managerial hires end up being the wrong one. That’s an over 8 in 10 failure rate. Now consider this statistic: in North America, on average, a person becomes a manager for the first time at age 30. They get their first training on how to be a manager at age 42. That’s a gap of 12 years. There’s likely a correlation between that 12-year gap and the 82 percent failure rate in the first research. When you don’t train managers and leave them to figure out for themselves, they can operate poorly (or become micromanagers), and that’s dangerous to the establishment of a good culture. There are dozens of examples of good companies for managerial training, but one that regularly surfaces in case studies is Bridgespan (a consultancy for nonprofits), who uses a 70-20-10 career development model. Remember, too, that management preferences have changed over the years, as millennials bring their own managing styles and expectations.

Want to learn more about work culture, as well as recruitment and retention best practices? Stay connected with College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted March 20, 2014 by

Career Tips: 6 Things Recruiters Love To Hear

Young businessman pointing at you to join his team

Young businessman pointing at you to join his team. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Summary: What can you say (or write) that will make recruiters stop whatever they’re doing and focus exclusively on you?

When you introduce yourself to a recruiter at a job fair or a face-to-face networking event, what can you say that will make a lasting impression and move your resume to the top of the list? And when recruiters are scanning social media profiles and resume databases for likely candidates, how can you get them to pause over your name and take a closer look at your credentials? Here are six sentences that recruiters love to find in profiles or hear when they meet candidates in person. (more…)

Posted July 31, 2013 by

5 Reasons You Didn’t Get That Job Offer — and What You Can Do Next Time

Woman with sad face showing thumbs down

Woman with sad face showing thumbs down. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

So you landed and then aced the interview for the job you know you are perfect for. Then came the letter — or phone call or email — with the news that you didn’t get the job you know was meant for you. The rejection missive may have provided a specific reason you didn’t get the job (“Another candidate’s qualifications better fit our needs”) or a more general one (“We have decided not to hire you”). In either case, it’s likely that you didn’t get the full story. Once you’ve recovered from your initial shock and disappointment, it will behoove you to perform some soul-searching to ascertain (a) why you (probably) didn’t get the job so (b) you can avoid it from happening in the future. (more…)

Posted July 30, 2012 by

How Recruiters and Hiring Managers can Help Candidates Make an Informed Career Decision

Joe Murphy

Joe Murphy of Shaker Consulting Group

Candidates are decision makers too. Patty Van Leer of NAS Recruitment Communications understands that.  I had a chance to speak with Patty at Taleo World.  I asked her what we can do to help candidates make a more informed career decision.  She offers three clear suggestions on what can be done to the candidate experience.  Click PLAY below and hear what she has to say.  Then scroll down to read more. (more…)