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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 12, 2019 by

Is it Time for the Unpaid Internship to Die?

Is it Time for the Unpaid Internship to Die?

A quick online search will find you as many unpaid-intern horror stories as you care to read. From having to beg or borrow money to pay for transportation or work-approved clothing, to single-handedly moving a manager’s personal furniture out of one apartment into another, to picking up dog excrement, there are employers who think no task is too awful or undignified to assign to their poor unpaid interns.

The dismal reputation of the unpaid internship has led to a debate over whether this type of internship has outlived its usefulness—and common decency. The debate gained new momentum in January 2018, when the U.S. Department of Labor (DoL) rolled out new guidelines that make it easier for companies that want to hire unpaid interns.

The Primary Beneficiary Test

These new rules established a seven-point test, known as a “primary beneficiary test,” that determines whether the unpaid internship benefits the intern more than the company (the link to the DoL page showing the seven factors is listed in the Sources section of this article). If an analysis of the situation reveals that the intern is actually doing the work of an employee, he or she is entitled to both minimum wage and overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

However, the seven factors are open to interpretation, which some labor advocates fear will allow them to justify even the most mundane tasks—for instance, fetching coffee—as “learning the industry.” And while most of us agree that it’s never a bad thing to work your way up from the bottom, the potential for abuse by more unscrupulous employers is still there. This can open all employers up to lawsuits; in fact, the new DoL guidelines came about in response to lawsuits filed by interns alleging that their unpaid work on a film violated the FLSA. The courts agreed.

Future Disadvantages

A study by the National Association of Colleges and Employers showed that students who took unpaid internships or co-ops were less likely to receive a full-time offer of employment and, if they did receive an offer, a lower salary than their counterparts who took paid internships or co-ops.

Paid internships or co-ops with private, for-profit companies resulted in the highest offer rate, while similar, if less drastic, disparities were seen in other industries (figures are paid vs. unpaid):

  • Private, for-profit: 72.2% vs. 43.9%
  • Nonprofit: 51.7% vs. 41.5%
  • State/local government: 50.5% vs. 33.8%
  • Federal government sectors: 61.9% vs. 50%

There were also disparities in starting salary offers (again, paid vs. unpaid):

  • Private, for-profit: $53,521 vs. $34,375
  • Nonprofit: $41,876 vs. $31,443
  • State/local government: $42,693 vs. $32,969
  • Federal government sectors: $48,750 vs. $42,501

Other reasons to put unpaid internships to rest are simple ones:

  • Happier, more productive interns (a paycheck is a powerful motivator!)
  • Positive feedback from employees is better for an employer’s brand
  • Paid internships attract top talent, which is more likely to lead to full-time hires  
  • Students who are paying their way through school and need the money from an internship to continue their education, or who have taken on student debt they have to begin paying back after graduation, may be great candidates—but they won’t be able to work for any company that doesn’t provide a paycheck

Of course, not all unpaid internships result in horror stories. With a principled employer, the result can be a rewarding one; if not financially or in future prospects, at least in knowledge and experience. However, if you’re offering unpaid internships now, it’s worth studying the ways you can improve the process and reward your interns for their hard work on your behalf. Even an upgrade to minimum wage will give a worker a sense of empowerment and dignity that can make them a fan of your company—and, quite possibly, a future valued employee.

Sources:

https://www.thecut.com/2018/07/7-people-on-their-most-insane-unpaid-internship-stories.html

https://www.naceweb.org/job-market/internships/exploring-the-implications-of-unpaid-internships/

https://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs71.htm

https://www.naceweb.org/job-market/internships/paid-interns-co-ops-see-greater-offer-rates-and-salary-offers-than-their-unpaid-classmates/

Posted July 03, 2019 by

Are You a Recruiting Early Bird?

Are You a Recruiting Early Bird?

It’s such a familiar quote that it’s almost cliché, but only because it’s true: The early bird really does get the worm. It also gets the best college graduates and interns.

If your recruiting efforts tend to focus only on the most recent batch of candidates, you may have noticed that your hires often don’t quite match up with your vision of the ideal employee. And yet, year after year you see other companies boasting about their own lineups, which reliably consist of the best and the brightest graduates and interns—the ones you would have sold your soul to have working for you.

How do they do it? Do they have an inside track? Are their starting salaries that good? Do they offer a free trip around the world with each internship?

Or…could it be that these companies know that the best way to get their candidates of choice is to be the early bird? 

Getting the Grads

According to the results of a survey by recruitment process outsourcing firm Futurestep/Korn Ferry, 64% of the business executives surveyed believe the best time to start recruitment for graduates is before their graduation—more precisely, at the start of their senior year. And 21% start looking for their future talent during junior year. Is it any wonder that by the time they graduate, students have already had a chance to vet their future employers?

“In our experience, students who know what they want to do and are driven to pursue their career goals while still in school make the strongest employees,” says Futurestep’s Adam Blumberg, vice president, Key Accounts. “Solid recruiting programs start early and focus on securing the most qualified talent months before they actually graduate.”

Which makes sense when you think about it: There are only so many students who will graduate in any given year. The law of averages dictates that a limited number will be considered superstars. And of those superstars, only a certain percentage will have the right degree and experience for your company.

Especially in a job seeker’s market, when candidates have the luxury of choice, if you’re not there when their focus turns to their future employment options other companies will be—and your dream candidates will have offers in hand before you even step foot on campus.

Getting the Interns

According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, 65% of bachelor’s degree candidates participate in internship or co-op education. Summer is traditionally the most popular season for internships, but companies actually bring interns on board any time during the year for assignments that range from special projects to extra help in a busy-season crunch.

Given the absence of milestones that mark a graduate’s availability, is there a best time to recruit interns? Yes, there is. Once again, back-to-school time is considered the best time to introduce your internship offerings to students, whether you’re looking for summer or year-round interns.

That’s because the cycle is similar: companies post summer internship opportunities in the late fall/early winter time frame, students consider their options, and by May the top students have made their choices, been chosen by a company and are ready to start their internship once school lets out.

As you can see, when it comes to recruiting your graduates and students of choice, it’s all about the timing. It’s vital to be top of mind when a senior’s thoughts turn to their post-college employment prospects—or when the talented, motivated and hardest-working students start wondering where they can get their internship experience. Adjusting your recruiting schedule to include a September kickoff will not only give students a chance to take a long look at you. It will give you the chance to take a good look at them and see how well they fit into your vision for the future of your company.

Sources:

https://www.kornferry.com/press/the-early-bird-gets-the-best-college-graduates-korn-ferry-survey-shows-best-time-to-recruit-grads-is-the-autumn-of-the-candidates-senior-year

https://www.naceweb.org/job-market/internships/exploring-the-implications-of-unpaid-internships/

Posted February 07, 2019 by

Merging Technologies and People for the Workforce of the Future

Artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine learning or machine intelligence, is in its infancy yet poised to fundamentally change how we work, are educated, and run our businesses. AI is already impacting how leading employers engage with students and recent graduates and then hire and manage them.

AI offers tremendous opportunities to those in talent acquisition and human resources as well as society as a whole, but also poses some threats.

On December 10, 2018, hundreds of talent acquisition and other human resources leaders gathered in Mountain View, California and remotely via live stream to participate in the College Recruiting Bootcamp on AI, organized by job search site, College Recruiter, and hosted by Google.

Our featured presentation was delivered by Alexandra Levit, author of Humanity Works, speaker, consultant, futurist, Chair of the DeVry University Career Advisory Board think tank, and expert in all things workplace.

(more…)

Posted July 31, 2018 by

Talent acquisition in health care: 7 skills to recruit for and planning a future workforce

 

Where is talent missing in health care, and how can recruiters identify that talent? How can health care talent acquisition leaders plan their workforce to successfully compete and provide great patient care? We got into these questions with Janine Truitt, Chief Innovations Officer at Talent Think Innovations, and with Pam Baker, founder of Journeous. Collectively, Truitt and Baker spent about 30 years in health care and pharmaceuticals, including in HR and TA. They each provided unique insight into how to fill talent shortages, what kind of talent is needed, how to imagine the future of the health care workforce, and how recruiters can survive in this industry.

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Posted May 24, 2018 by

Gen Z Talent: Understand Them to Recruit Them [white paper]

 

All of your college recruitment, from now until 2033, will be tapping Gen Z talent. To say that Gen Z will change the workforce is an understatement. At College Recruiter, where we are this close to entry-level talent and swim in the pool of TA trends, we think this generation will transform your workforce.

Gen Z, born after 2000 (some say as early as 1995) will make up 20% of workforce by 2020. We have learned a lot about what makes Gen Z different and how you can recruit them. We teamed up with Door of Clubs to tap into current insights and bring you a white paper full of real tips for recruiters, employment branding specialists and HR leaders.

Read the full white paper to understand how to shift your entry-level recruitment to attract Gen Z candidates

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Posted April 19, 2018 by

Succession planning should include development of entry-level talent: Interview with Kelly Renz

 

Succession planning often focuses on executive roles only, but as Kelly Renz of The Novo Group says, “that’s missing the boat.” I caught up with Renz, who is CEO of The Novo Group, where they believe better people means better business. She claims to be a non-conformist when it comes to business practices and she’ll be a speaker at SHRM 2018, presenting “Demystifying Succession Planning: It’s Easier Than You Think!” She insists that succession planning is not rocket science and has great insight into the importance of developing your entry-level talent.

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Posted April 12, 2018 by

How do you pay students and recent graduates when 10 percent don’t have bank accounts?

 

SHRM18 Blogger GraphicI have learned a lot over the years about millennials, and more recently, Gen Z, and how employers can and should recruit and engage them. Recently, however, I learned something new.

I was recently offered the opportunity to be one of the official bloggers for The Society for Human Resources Management national, annual conference, being held in Chicago in June 2018. I felt honored and thrilled about the opportunity to learn from presenters, moderators, panelists, and exhibitors prior to the conference. I learned something about millennials from Alicia Blanda, managing partner of ATM at Work and exhibitor at #SHRM18 (more…)

Posted March 21, 2018 by

Does on-campus recruitment result in age discrimination against older workers?

 

Many employers value building a pipeline of talent out of college and developing that talent into future leaders. Does this strategy imply embedded age discrimination? Two years ago, Steve Rabin, a 53-year-old CPA who unsuccessfully applied to work for PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (“PwC”), filed an age discrimination lawsuit against PwC. If his lawyers are successful, the class action will collectively represent Rabin and all other unsuccessful PwC accountant applicants who were 40 years or older, from 2013 to the present.  (more…)

Posted March 07, 2018 by

The advantages one employer found to leaving their on campus recruitment behind

 

I recently participated in an online discussion with university relations leaders for Fortune 1,000 companies and federal government agencies, college career service office professionals, and others with a passion for the world of college and university recruiting.

One talent acquisition leader asked which U.S. schools they should visit to recruit Polish and Arab engineering students. His company would send those students to their home countries to work at the company’s facilities there. Below is my response. (more…)

Posted February 14, 2018 by

What about the gig economy employers should build into their workforce analysis

 

HR leaders, as you do a workforce analysis, do you see the gig economy as a threat or an opportunity? I checked in with Mona Tawakali, Vice President of Digital Strategy with KRT Marketing to get insight into this question. Tawakali has not only done extensive research on the trend and the impact of the gig economy, but her team is also continually hearing from employers about how the new world of work is changing their strategies.

Overall, your organization should see the growing gig economy as an opportunity. Business leaders understand the increasing need for agility, and the gig economy lends itself nicely to being nimble. With people working gigs or projects, it becomes easier to scale up or down more quickly. You can “change your workforce for the skills you need” at the moment, says Tawakali. This is especially beneficial for startups, small businesses and growing companies. The effect of this, she says, is a more efficient economy overall. (more…)