ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted April 24, 2019 by

Looking for a remote part-time, seasonal, internship, or entry-level job?

On March 19th, College Recruiter announced on The Chad and Cheese Podcast that our site, leveraging search technology from Google Cloud Talent Solutions, had rolled out major upgrades to how students, recent graduates, and other candidates can search for and find jobs. The announcement in March was two-fold:

  1. Candidates can search all of the job postings using any of 100+ languages, even if the job posting was written in English. Employers hiring retail sales associates, for example, could advertise those positions in English but may see an increase in applications from those whose primary language is Spanish but who are also proficient in English.
  2. Rather than searching for jobs by city or state/province, we became one of the first sites not just to enable commute search, but to put it front and center. If you’re searching for a part-time job in New York City, does it really matter that the job is in New York City? Wouldn’t it be more relevant if you could restrict or prioritize your search to jobs which are within a 15-minute walk, 30-minute cycle, 45-minutes on public transport, etc? Thanks to our friends at Google, the millions of candidates who use College Recruiter a year now search by how long it will take for them to get to a job rather than the less meaningful proxy of how far away that job is.

Today, in collaboration with Google Cloud, we are excited to share another huge step forward for candidates. Quite simply, candidates who are searching for remote work will no longer need to guess at whether the employer has included words in their job posting such as virtual, home-based, work-from-home, WFH, or telecommute. Until now, if the candidate included in her search the keyword “remote” and the employer included in his posting the keyword “virtual”, very, very few job boards would be able to match the two job postings. In other words, job postings rarely clearly described work opportunities as being available for remote work even when they were. Effective immediately, we’re able to do so and we’re able to do so exceptionally well.

According to Google, “job seekers have different lifestyle and geographic needs that require flexibility. Working from home can enable parents and caregivers to be more available to their families. It can help retain a high performing employee who regularly relocates as a military spouse. And it can help increase the loyalty of millennial and Generation Z employees who are much likelier to stay in a role for 5+ years if their company is flexible about where and when they work.”

In addition to helping the largely Millennial and Gen Z candidates who use College Recruiter to find great careers, we’re also excited about the promise this enhancement has for those with disabilities that make it difficult or even impossible to commute to work. There’s a tremendous amount of talent in these people. We’re proud to be a part of this solution.

Posted April 11, 2016 by

10 job interview questions you shouldn’t ask

Bad job interview - concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Eviled/Shutterstock.com

Congratulations! You’ve landed an entry-level job interview. Now, it is time to prepare for the big day, which includes creating some interview questions to ask if you get the chance. Keep in mind, though, there are questions college students and recent graduates should not ask their potential employers during interviews.

1. How much does the job pay?

Asking about salary in an interview tells the interviewer you’re more concerned with money than the actual job. I’m not saying money isn’t important, but save this discussion for after you have received a job offer.

2. How many days of vacation do I get?

It’s not wise for job seekers to ask about vacation time before landing entry-level jobs. Focusing on time off without a job offer leaves an impression that you lack commitment to work.

3. Can I take time off during exams?

This question might indicate to employers that college students have trouble handling multiple responsibilities, or that school is more important than work. Even though school work is a priority for students, employers are considering what is important to them.

4. Can I use social media at work?

It’s probably obvious to most (if not all) of you why job seekers shouldn’t ask this question. Interviewers would feel you’re more concerned with your Facebook friends and Twitter followers than succeeding at the position you’ve applied for.

Businessman working from home on laptop courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

5. Can I work from home?

Asking this question can leave an interviewer wondering if you have an issue with coming to work regularly. Wait until proving yourself for a while on a new job before requesting to work from home.

6. What kind of job is this?

Please don’t ask this question. If you do, you might as well walk out of the interview. The interviewer expects you to know what kind of job you’ve applied for. You can find this information in the job posting and on the company website.

7. When will I get promoted?

Asking this question makes the assumption that a job seeker has won the position, which won’t impress the interviewer. Remember, you need to get the job first so concentrate on that. With a good attitude and hard work, you may eventually earn a promotion.

8. Do you want my references?

The interviewer is concerned about you, not anyone else. It’s great you have references but save them for later, and focus on nailing the interview.

9. Are there any background checks?

Asking potential employers about background checks raises a red flag in their minds that you have something to hide. If you’re sure of yourself as a job candidate, a background check or drug screen won’t bother you.

10. Did I get the job?

While I’m sure you can’t wait to find out if you got the job, avoid asking if you did in the interview. Unless you’re told otherwise, follow up to learn the employer’s decision. Don’t follow up too soon. It’s okay to ask the employer at the end of the interview about the timeline for filling the position—this lets you know how long to wait before calling to check on your status as an applicant.

In a nutshell, job seekers should wait until after they receive employment offers before asking questions related to issues primarily benefiting themselves.

Are you looking for more information to help you in your job search? Come over to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Posted July 29, 2015 by

Employee Benefits of Video Conferencing

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

Video conferencing is rapidly changing the way business is done worldwide. Once an expensive and unwieldy network to set up and run, advances like cloud based conferencing have made installing video conferencing a streamlined and hassle-free experience.

You may have heard about the myriad of benefits video conferencing can bring to your business and your customers, but there’s another incredibly important group that benefits from video conferencing: your employees.

How can adopting video conferences create a better work environment for your most important resource? Take a look at some of the benefits. (more…)

Posted July 16, 2015 by

Preparing for a Job in the Computer Science Industry

Deborah Anderson photo

Deborah Anderson

It is tricky finding a job anytime, but especially in this economy (which goes back to the crash in 2008). Fortunately, straight out of college, with no experience, graduates will find that the going is a bit easier than those with experience.

Why is that? As you gain experience, it sometimes becomes trickier because companies prefer the lower salaries (easier on their budgets) of educated, but inexperienced employees. Understanding that, as you start on your career path, helps you in the long run. (more…)

Posted April 02, 2015 by

10 Ways to Be More Productive as an Entrepreneur

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

If you’ve ever been inspired by Ehsan Bayat’s presentations, you may be wondering how you can make a difference, too. When it comes to running a small business or launching a new idea, productivity is key. Here are a few must-know productivity tips that successful entrepreneurs follow. (more…)

Posted February 27, 2015 by

Considerations for Your Next Move (How It Can Affect Your Career)

Deborah Anderson photo

Deborah Anderson

While it is true that it is still pretty early in the school year for most college students, those finals and the last days of the school year are just around the corner. It is easy to plan out how you will address the class requirements, but sometimes the other aspects of life are missed or not given as much attention and you may find yourself “throwing it together” when faced with projects at the end of the year.

One of those areas is the dorm room or suite that you have occupied and that you won’t be needing in the summer. Even if you have already graduated (congratulations!), you may not have found that next place to live, or if you have, you may be wondering if this is your final destination. Speaking from experience, that choice of where to live can sometimes change a few times in life, especially as it relates to jobs! (more…)

Posted February 23, 2015 by

How to Make a Strong Career in Debt Settlement?

Debt settlement - approved

Debt settlement – approved. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Debt settlement can be considered as the process where a huge, one-time payment can be offered in exchange of forgiving the remaining debt from your balance. The best debt settlement activities can be done by the financial professionals in this field. To make a strong career in this arena, you must keep a few things in mind. (more…)

Posted February 10, 2015 by

Affording the Unaffordable: Empty Pockets Don’t Equal Empty Life

Melissa Burns photo

Melissa Burns

How often do you say to yourself or hear it from those near you: “You can’t afford it”? But the truth is, there are very few things you really can’t afford. Even if your financial position leaves much to be desired, it doesn’t mean you should skimp on everything – and it doesn’t mean you cannot do anything to improve it. Here are 5 ways to afford the unaffordable: (more…)

Posted September 02, 2014 by

College Graduates, Interested in Writing Jobs? 10 Reasons You May Want to be a Freelance Academic Writer

College graduates who have an interest in writing jobs should consider 10 reasons to become a freelance academic writer found in the following post.

The job market now offers a vast diversity of online and offline job opportunities. It’s often easy to get lost in the abundance of attractive offerings available. However, when you know your true passions and aspirations, it’s getting much easier to pick up the job you are cut out for. If you have an

Read more:

Continue Reading

Posted August 20, 2014 by

Interviewing for Jobs, Recent College Graduates? Don’t Ask These 10 Questions

Recent college graduates interviewing for jobs should not ask these 10 questions found in the following post.

You’ve spent the last 45 minutes sitting in a job interview; the hiring manager is about to wrap up. And right then, the hiring manager asks: “Do you have any questions for me?” You were prepared. But you lock up! In an effort to think on your feet, you blurt out, “How much does this

View this article:

Continue Reading