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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 11, 2016 by

10 job interview questions you shouldn’t ask

Bad job interview - concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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Congratulations! You’ve landed an entry-level job interview. Now, it is time to prepare for the big day, which includes creating some interview questions to ask if you get the chance. Keep in mind, though, there are questions college students and recent graduates should not ask their potential employers during interviews.

1. How much does the job pay?

Asking about salary in an interview tells the interviewer you’re more concerned with money than the actual job. I’m not saying money isn’t important, but save this discussion for after you have received a job offer.

2. How many days of vacation do I get?

It’s not wise for job seekers to ask about vacation time before landing entry-level jobs. Focusing on time off without a job offer leaves an impression that you lack commitment to work.

3. Can I take time off during exams?

This question might indicate to employers that college students have trouble handling multiple responsibilities, or that school is more important than work. Even though school work is a priority for students, employers are considering what is important to them.

4. Can I use social media at work?

It’s probably obvious to most (if not all) of you why job seekers shouldn’t ask this question. Interviewers would feel you’re more concerned with your Facebook friends and Twitter followers than succeeding at the position you’ve applied for.

Businessman working from home on laptop courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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5. Can I work from home?

Asking this question can leave an interviewer wondering if you have an issue with coming to work regularly. Wait until proving yourself for a while on a new job before requesting to work from home.

6. What kind of job is this?

Please don’t ask this question. If you do, you might as well walk out of the interview. The interviewer expects you to know what kind of job you’ve applied for. You can find this information in the job posting and on the company website.

7. When will I get promoted?

Asking this question makes the assumption that a job seeker has won the position, which won’t impress the interviewer. Remember, you need to get the job first so concentrate on that. With a good attitude and hard work, you may eventually earn a promotion.

8. Do you want my references?

The interviewer is concerned about you, not anyone else. It’s great you have references but save them for later, and focus on nailing the interview.

9. Are there any background checks?

Asking potential employers about background checks raises a red flag in their minds that you have something to hide. If you’re sure of yourself as a job candidate, a background check or drug screen won’t bother you.

10. Did I get the job?

While I’m sure you can’t wait to find out if you got the job, avoid asking if you did in the interview. Unless you’re told otherwise, follow up to learn the employer’s decision. Don’t follow up too soon. It’s okay to ask the employer at the end of the interview about the timeline for filling the position—this lets you know how long to wait before calling to check on your status as an applicant.

In a nutshell, job seekers should wait until after they receive employment offers before asking questions related to issues primarily benefiting themselves.

Are you looking for more information to help you in your job search? Come over to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Posted October 07, 2015 by

Getting into the job search routine after vacation

Job search career hiring opportunity employment concept

Job search career hiring opportunity employment concept. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Late summer and early fall brings many things. The welcome scent of pumpkin spice wafts through our favorite coffee shops, department stores inexplicably begin decorating for Thanksgiving and Christmas, and college students begin returning to school after a restful summer vacation. If you are one of these college students, you are probably just beginning to get back into the groove of things. You’ve probably begun adjusting to a new sleep schedule, memorized where your classes are, and otherwise made the transition back to school. This is great, but have you also gotten your job search on track? After all, if you are like most students, looking for a job was probably not a high priority over the summer. Now that you are back in school and getting back to business, why not kick your job search efforts into high gear? (more…)

Posted September 04, 2015 by

Losing A Dream Job- Learn How You Can Handle The Situation With 6 Easy Tips

office, the head of a woman worker's release

Office, the head of a woman worker’s release. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Losing your dream job seems like a nightmare as it rips your self-esteem to shreds. Not only such a situation leaves you with a very limited lifestyle but sometimes, it also pushes you into deep depression and stress. However, below you will learn some wonderful tips that will help you cope after losing your dream job and start working towards a new career: (more…)

Posted May 13, 2015 by

How To Write Crisp, Clean, Clutter-free Cover Letters!

Jimmy Sweeney

Jimmy Sweeney, President of CareerJimmy

There’s nothing quite like a crisp, clean, clutter-free dress shirt or blouse. It makes a statement about the person wearing it. And the same is true for a job search cover letter. Include your experience and skills in as few words as possible and then ask for an interview for the job you want. The hiring manager will remember you because your cover letter will have made a statement about you as a person. (more…)

Posted May 01, 2015 by

Telltale Signs You Need a Break From Work

Office worker takes a break from his work and leans back daydreaming

Office worker takes a break from his work and leans back daydreaming. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Stress among adults is often linked to work. The problem is they don’t know when they are already stressed.

Juliet Schor, writer of the best selling book The Overworked American, tells that people are literally working themselves to death. They get 90 minutes less sleep than they should, resulting to chronic diseases like hypertension, diabetes and depression.

Overworking can cause serious problems but modern employees have become workaholics. Dean Schabner of ABC news reports that people work longer days, get less vacation time, and feel pressured with competition resulting to so much stress.

So how can you tell if you are too stressed from work? Here are some signs you need to observe: (more…)

Posted October 10, 2014 by

9 Things You Should Never Say In a Job Interview

Aaron Gouveia

Aaron Gouveia, Salary.com contributing writer

Is it any wonder job interviews are such fertile ground for disaster?

Just think about it for a second. The hiring manager has to fill the position quickly and with the right person, and has to choose from a pool of candidates who are more than likely desperate to find employment and pay bills. Applicants have an hour or so to present themselves in the best possible light, and if you believe some experts it only takes a few seconds following a first impression for people to make their final judgments. Finally, throw in a hefty portion of self-doubt and amped up nerves, and it becomes pretty clear why there are so many job interview horror stories. (more…)

Posted May 12, 2014 by

Just Had a Vacation from Those Recent Graduate Jobs? Don’t Post Photos that Might Harm Your Career

While you might be tempted to show off your vacation photos, be careful not the rub anyone the wrong way on those recent graduate jobs.  Learn more in the following post.

You’ve been endlessly plugging away at work for months; spending late nights at the office and wishing that someone would invent a coffee IV already. Impressing your boss at every turn can be exhausting, so you start desperately counting down the days to when you can finally get some R & R and your skin can

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Posted April 11, 2014 by

College Graduates, 10 Things You Need to Be Aware of When Hired for Entry Level Jobs

As college graduates transition from school to the workforce, they should understand that there will be differences between these environments.  The following post highlights 10 things new grads need to be aware of when hired for entry level jobs.

A Guide To Your First Entry-Level Job. 10 things new graduates absolutely need to know. By U.S.News. Posted Apr 4th 2014 @ 5:00AM. Share. Businesswoman looking at a businessman listening to headphones and blowing bubbles…

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Posted September 12, 2013 by

Finding a Company that Values You During Your Entry Level Job Search

How important is it for you to be valued in the workplace?  If you are searching for an entry level job or other position with this in mind, the following post explains how to find a company that will make you feel important as an employee.

Some companies that talk of valuing their employees are more comfortable spouting out platitudes than actually doing anything concrete to express true value. But smart companies know that “valuing employees” isn’t just a box to be checked off. Employees are the real workhorses of a company; when they’re motivated and engaged, they can make

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Posted August 15, 2013 by

Vacation Time? 12 Ways to Leave the Office Behind

Dawn Dugan

Dawn Dugan, Salary.com contributing writer

You work hard. You deserve your vacation. Yet in a world where we’re all shouldering more and constant connectivity is par for the course, leaving the office behind can seem difficult, if not impossible.

Yet with a little preparation and follow-through, work doesn’t have to ruin your vacation.

This article explores 12 tips to a restorative, relaxing, and work-free vacation you can truly enjoy. (more…)