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Posted August 22, 2016 by

Recruiters’ failure to follow-up hurts networking

Emotional stress, frustration, telephone photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Attending networking events on college campuses is a great way for recruiters and hiring managers to interact with and build relationships with college students. By engaging in conversations with college students, recruiters and hiring managers can find potential candidates for entry-level jobs, internships, or other career opportunities. It is also important to keep in mind that networking is a two-way street. While it is important for students to follow-up with recruiters, recruiters should do the same.

One mistake some recruiters make is not following up during the hiring process. This can not only create a less impressive candidate experience but can also a company or organization’s reputation. Kevin Fallon, Director of Career Services at Salisbury University (Maryland), discusses the negative effect left on college students when recruiters do not follow up during the hiring process.

“The single biggest mistake we often see recruiters and hiring managers make during the hiring process is a lack of follow-up or follow-through. College students will come to us and say ‘I never heard back from (recruiter) at (name of company) – Should I follow up with them?’ This lack of following through on communicating with students is damaging to an organization’s brand, and it leaves them with an unfavorable view of the organization. It especially does when you consider the contact management software available today.”

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Kevin Fallon, Director of Career Services at Salisbury University

Kevin Fallon, Director of Career Services at Salisbury University

Kevin Fallon serves as the Director of Career Services at Salisbury University (Maryland), where he leads the delivery of career and professional development services to more than 8,000 students enrolled in, as well as alumni from 42 undergraduate and 14 graduate programs in business, education, science and technology, and the liberal arts. Prior to joining Salisbury, Fallon’s 22-year career included talent acquisition and talent development leadership roles with global Fortune organizations such as PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Accenture, and Bank of America, as well as university career services leadership roles with the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland College Park and Rider University in Lawrenceville, New Jersey.

Posted April 15, 2015 by

Top 12 Hidden Gem Colleges for Employers Hiring Electrical Engineering Majors

Electrical Engineering Hidden Gem Index AwardMinneapolis, MN, April 15, 2015 — College Recruiter, the leading niche job board used by recent college graduates to find entry-level jobs and students to find internships, today announced the 12 winners of its 2015 Hidden Gem Index for the best colleges and universities for employers who want to hire high quality graduates who majored in electrical and electronics engineering.

“There are a lot of awards out there for best colleges,” said Steven Rothberg, president and founder of College Recruiter, “but they almost all focus on starting salary, percentage of graduates employed upon graduation, or percentage of graduates employed within their chosen career path upon graduation. There’s nothing wrong with those rankings but they fail to tell the entire picture. They miss schools which are hidden gems because they do an incredibly great job of taking students who may not have been able to get into the most expensive or most prestigious schools but who are hired into the same types of jobs with the same types of companies paying the same types of starting salaries.”

College Recruiter used its custom research product to generate this ranking. Our database includes 185 majors at virtually every one of the 4,000 one- and two-year colleges and 3,000 four-year colleges and universities in the United States. A custom labor market or salary research report can tell an employer, for example, what the going rate is for a recent graduate with a certain major at a specific school. Other common queries include data related to SAT scores, gender, ethnicity, as well as tenure and turnover of employees. (more…)