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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted January 07, 2016 by

Finding your first full-time job after college

Ever felt torn about making plans? I have. Especially as a college student, I felt frozen when making decisions. Small decisions were simple. When selecting pizza toppings (my college boyfriend worked as a Domino’s delivery driver so we often pigged out on the stuff) or choosing whether to hang out in Memphis or St. Louis for the weekend, I could manage. But ask me to plot out the next five years of my life? No thanks.

Maybe you can relate. Let’s pretend it’s May 1, college graduation is the following weekend, and all your friends are making down payments on apartments. They’re gabbing about how they plan to spend their first “real” paychecks at their first “real” jobs, bragging about how they found their first full-time jobs, and your head is buried under a beanbag like an ostrich in the sand.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Duplass/Shutterstock.com

It’s easy to temporarily pretend the world of adulting doesn’t exist.

But it does, of course.

If you’re a senior in college, it’s not really your future career we’re talking about—it’s the now. I know, I know—go ahead and grab the nearest pillow and cover your head for a moment to muffle the ear-piercing panicky scream. Then breathe.

Your future career isn’t really your future career, and you’re already technically an adult. Career planning is an ongoing process, and you’ve already begun working on it whether you realize it or not.

You began the career planning process your first year of college or even earlier in life. During your first few years of college, probably before completing 60 credit hours, you selected a major field of study. You might have met with an academic advisor or career counselor regarding your choice of major/minor and discussed the job outlook (including expected salary range) for your field of study (if not, it’s never too late to do this or to research this information on your own).

If you were super proactive, you might have visited the career services or career development office and sought career counseling advice and services related to resume writing, interview skills, and other valuable information. Or you might have blown this off entirely and thought you’d get to it later. That’s okay—you have one semester left on campus—make the most of it!

Like many students, you probably obtained some form of work experience while in college, either during the academic year or during summer/winter breaks. Whether you worked part-time or full-time, volunteered, or worked as an intern (paid or unpaid), you learned real transferable job skills to list on your resume and discuss in upcoming interviews. Did you know you were investing in your future career while standing over a vat of grease, waiting to pull French fries for 50 hungry customers at lunch? You were. You obtained customer service skills, time management skills, multitasking skills, and team working skills, to name a few. Those 15 hours per week each semester weren’t wasted.

The key at this point in your career journey is to refuse to remain satisfied with where you’re at. You’ve worked your tail off in college. Now’s the time to apply what you’ve learned, both in the classroom and outside the classroom, and begin searching for your first full-time job, one related to your college major, rather than remaining underemployed or unemployed after graduation.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Kotin/Shutterstock.com

I can see you breathing a little more evenly now. See—you’ve already connected several crucial dots on the path to career success.

Follow our blog and let us help you maintain motivation this semester as you begin searching for your first full-time job.

 

Posted September 18, 2014 by

5 Reasons to Find a Job that Matches Your Skill Set Instead of Your Passion

Young female student looking through job offers on board

Young female student looking through job offers on board. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Most, if not all, job seekers have heard that they should find something they’re passionate about for work.  While it makes sense to do what you really like, should you be searching for a job this way?  The following post shares five reasons why this method could be wrong.

Much of the career advice that’s doled out these days encourages young people to “follow their dreams” and “feed their passion.” And sure, it sounds good. Who wouldn’t want to make money by doing a job that doesn’t really feel like “work”? Who wouldn’t want to turn a lifelong dream into a reality?  But if you’re hoping (or holding out) for your dream job, Ben Carpenter is here with some tough love: What you’re good at should trump what you’re passionate about. (more…)

Posted September 02, 2014 by

4 Ways to Be An Attractive Hire

Successful applicant holding her document files

Successful applicant holding her document files. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

No one needs to tell you that the current job market is ultra-competitive. Executives are finding themselves unemployed or underemployed, while new graduates are having a tough time just getting noticed. Here are four ways to get a hiring manager’s attention, from writing your résumé to signing your offer letter. (more…)

Posted July 16, 2014 by

Wondering If You Will Ever Get that Entry Level Job? Keep These 5 Things in Mind

If you’ve been searching and searching for an entry level job without success and feel like giving up, there are five things you should remember found in the following post.

Most people have heard that “job-hunting is a full-time job,” but what often goes unsaid is that it’s pretty much the worst full-time job. It’s tedious, you have to work weekends, there are no happy hours with coworkers, and to top it all off, it doesn’t even pay the bills… at least not right away. So if you’ve been searching for months and are nowhere near landing your dream job, it’s understandable that you sometimes feel like you want to throw up your hands, open a bottle of wine, and call it quits. But before you start looking for sturdy cardboard boxes to live in, try first to remember these 5 important things:

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Posted June 11, 2014 by

Consider Insurance Sales to Launch a Successful Career

Peter Leighton

Peter Leighton, Vice President of Recruiting for Combined Insurance

It’s no secret that college graduates in today’s economy face a tough job market, possibly the toughest in decades.  U.S. Labor Department statistics note that 36 percent of the 3-million recent grads in their twenties are currently unemployed or underemployed, many working part-time jobs that don’t use their degree. Many feel frustrated to be spending these critical career-building years working as retail and customer service clerks, or as waiters, bartenders or manual laborers, after years of hard work to earn those degrees.

It doesn’t have to be that way.  For those who are ambitious, determined and self-motivated and enjoy working with people, there is an alternative path.

You may want to consider sales. (more…)

Posted May 27, 2014 by

Employers, Are You Training Workers for Entry Level Jobs? Why You May Want to

When hiring for entry level jobs, employers might want to consider training workers for these positions.  Learn why in the following post.

If there is a future area of strength you know the business will need in general, plant the seeds in entry-level training, whether a trainee’s first job requires it or not. By improving the processes for cultivating your newest and…

Link:

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Posted May 19, 2014 by

Not Satisfied with Recent Graduate Jobs Due to Underemployment? How to Get the Most Out of It

For young professionals on recent graduate jobs who are unhappy being underemployed, the following post offers advice on making the most of these positions for the future.

50 percent of recent college graduates were either unemployed or underemployed. Underemployed means you have a job, but it might be part-time and it’s definitely below your skill set, education and capability. This is the position I found myself in three months after graduating. However, I wasn’t satisfied with being underemployed.

This article:

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Posted May 14, 2014 by

Why Aren’t Some Job Seekers Not Landing Jobs for Recent College Graduates? 5 Possible Reasons

For job seekers who are having a difficult time finding jobs for recent college graduates, the following post shares five possible reasons why.

“I’ve been sending out my resume for months and not hearing anything back.” I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had a recent grad call with that exact same statement. It’s practically epidemic – and certainly a symptom of bigger issues. At last count, nearly 4 out of 10 new grads under the age

Originally posted here:

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Posted May 13, 2014 by

Class of 2014 Expects to Find Entry Level Jobs in Their Career Fields, but Will They?

As the class of 2014 prepares to graduate, most of them believe they will find entry level jobs within their career fields.  However, is this a realistic expectation for these soon to be college graduates?  The following post has more information.

Graduates, she says, may be buoyed by improved jobs numbers recently, but they still face some uncertainties. Upcoming graduates are placing stock in job training because they intend to stay longer in their entry-level jobs.

View this article –

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Posted February 14, 2014 by

Not So in Love with Your Current Job? 21% of Workers Looking for New Employment in 2014

Today is Valentine’s Day and while some of you will express your love to someone special, some workers are expressing a desire to change jobs.  That’s right, there are job seekers not so in love with their current positions.  So employers, if you’re wondering why some of your employees want to move on, the following post offers several reasons, as well as reasons other employees will stay on their jobs. (more…)