ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 22, 2018 by

How your diversity activities can increase retention

 

Do you know whether your diversity activities results in increased retention? Any organization that is known for churning through its diverse talent will have a hard time recruiting future diversity. Here we get into challenges for HR leaders, including causes of high turnover, the impact cultural sensitivity, specific ideas for retention strategies, and what millennials bring to the table. We spoke with Martin Edmondson, CEO of GradCore, and with Janine Truitt, Chief Innovations Officer at Talent Think Innovations.

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Posted May 27, 2016 by

Onboarding should focus on new hire experience

Job, new, time photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

When creating onboarding programs, employers should consider the interests of their new hires. This means focusing on what makes new hires comfortable and engaged with the onboarding process. Companies can take steps to create a smooth transition into the workplace for new employees. Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany, shares ways employers can build effective onboarding programs for new hires.

“A strong onboarding program is created with the new hire experience in mind. Many employers fail to make the first few days for employees exciting or fun. Bring people on and get them excited immediately.

Onboarding starts before new employees ever step foot in the office. So provide them with plenty of information about the company, who they’ll be meeting in the first few days, and what to expect from the entire process of getting oriented with their workspace, team, and tasks. Create an agenda before hiring employees.

Make employees feel comfortable with a clean, new space to work and introduce them to their colleagues. Encourage the staff to build casual relationships with new hires by taking them out to lunch; it establishes trust and respect. Essentially, employers are assigning mentors, employees the hires feel comfortable reaching out to.

Training should cover all of the protocols and procedures, but it needs to be engaging and can even be fun. Make it interactive; create games like scavenger hunts or other competitions to break the ice while also being informative. Technology is great for onboarding because it provides a convenient, easily accessible resource for new hires to find basic information including the dress code, benefits details, and the like, and to see how they fit within the company as a whole.

Be clear about company expectations and invest in training new hires over several weeks. This makes it easier to offer feedback, and go over the first performance evaluation. Consistent feedback and constructive critiques will help them improve on concerns as they arise, resulting in better evaluations and improving the company’s quality of hire.”

Need advice for creating an onboarding program? Get onboard our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

Andre Lavoie is the CEO of ClearCompany, the first talent alignment platform that bridges the gap between talent management and business strategy by contextualizing employees’ work around a company’s vision and goals. You can connect with him and the ClearCompany team on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

Posted May 26, 2016 by

5 common onboarding mistakes employers make

Businesswoman dissatisfied with subordinate's behavior photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

The onboarding process should be a positive and productive experience for new employees. Employers who succeed during this process benefit in the short-term and long-term with satisfied employees who can help achieve company goals. However, if onboarding is done incorrectly, new hires won’t likely be effective for companies. Wesley Higbee, President of Full City Tech Co., shares five common onboarding mistakes made by employers.

1. Treating everybody the same. It’s important to have a process or checklist. Just don’t try to standardize it. Tailor what you do to the candidates you’re hiring. If new hires have accolades in sales, don’t put them through a sales training program.

2. Waiting periods for benefits. There’s nothing to gain by withholding vacation days, health care, etc. Waiting periods connote cheapskate and/or creates mistrust. If you don’t trust new employees enough to give them benefits on day one, why are you hiring them?

3. Not training new employees. Just throwing them to the wolves and of course, firing them when they don’t perform up to your expectations. The same expectations you never made clear.

4. Not including new hires in the process of assessing what they want/need to learn. Force feeding training and then throwing employees to the wolves.

5. Not learning from new hires. Assuming learning is a one-way road. There are plenty of candidates you might hire that have more to teach you, than you have to teach them.”

Looking for help with your onboarding process? Check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Wesley Higbee, President of Full City Tech Co.

Wesley Higbee, President of Full City Tech Co.

Wes Higbee helps organizations make the leap from today to tomorrow. Wes’s career has been a journey. He started out in software development helping organizations tackle business opportunities. In working closely with customers as a consultant, he realized there are many needs beyond the software itself that nobody was taking care of. Those are the needs he addresses today, whether or not technology is involved.

Along the journey, Wes has had a passion for sharing knowledge. He’s been a speaker at countless local groups, community organizations, webinars, and conferences. He speaks professionally to help organizations improve.

Posted March 28, 2016 by

11 quick LinkedIn tips

Linkedin website on a computer screen courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Ingvar Bjork/Shutterstock.com

Did you know 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn to look for candidates? This means companies can find job seekers’ profiles and invite them for job interviews. For this to happen, though, job seekers need to make their profiles look appropriate. Adding their pictures and job titles is not enough anymore, as their LinkedIn profiles can be more important than their resumes. If job seekers want recruiters to visit their pages often and offer them great positions, here are some things they should consider.

1. Recommendations

Employers tend to pay a lot of attention not only to job seekers’ professional skills, but also to their corporate backgrounds. If applicants have proven to be excellent team workers at their previous jobs, they should seek recommendations from former bosses or colleagues. Ask some of them to write a couple of nice recommendations. Don’t exaggerate here, though. If applicants have had five jobs so far but have 15 recommendations, it might seem weird.

2. Write a longer headline

If you already have a job, but are open to new offerings, don’t just mention the company and your position there; it might be not enough to see what you do. Instead of writing, for example, “PR Manager at Example Company,” write “PR manager at Example Company: Helping big and small companies.”

3. Have enough connections

Having 50 connections on LinkedIn makes job seekers seem unfriendly, unprofessional, and unmotivated. Having 3000 contacts makes them look like they add everyone to their list of connections, and they don’t even care who’s there. Try to have a moderate number of connections, and you will be visible enough to make the network help your professional growth. Try to find all of your friends, former classmates, and colleagues if you’ve already worked somewhere.

4. Write only true information

We don’t want to lecture job seekers, but lying is unacceptable in the professional world. It concerns their LinkedIn profiles, too, particularly education and previous jobs. It is not only that recruiters can check everything, but it is also about ethics. Earning trust is an important step to professional success.

5. Be brief

No one likes to read lots of text, especially if it is not formatted correctly. Even if job seekers had tons of experience and they want to talk about it, they should organize it. Write a job title and describe your responsibilities point by point. Use headlines and short sentences; they are easier to comprehend.

6. Students can mention all the jobs they’ve had

Surely, when you are a big boss with 10 jobs behind, you can skip some of the gigs you’ve had such as pizza delivery or tutoring in college. However, college students or recent graduates might want to add at least some things to their work experience. Besides, most students do something during their college years. If they managed to study and freelance at the same time, they should mentions that. If students helped their professors grade papers, they can write about that too. Don’t leave a page blank; add at least something.

7. Choose the right picture for your profile

Don’t pick an Instagram-style photo or a cute picture with your pets; post casual photos on Facebook or elsewhere. Low-quality pictures are also not the best choice. Think of how you want potential employers to see you. The photo should be a recent, high-quality photograph where one can clearly see your face. You can also add a background picture; the best choice would be either a picture from some conference you participated in or some nature pic.

8. Write about your main skills, not all of them

We all know you are a talented person. However, if you are trying for an accountant job, recruiters probably don’t need to know you are a good cook. At the top of your LinkedIn page, your potential employer or recruiters need to see those skills suitable for them. Also, don’t mention the skills you don’t want to use in your next job. If you are tired of your current work where you need to design, for example, exclude this skill from your profile.

9. Add a decent email address

If your personal email address is dirtykitten@email.com or something like that, you probably want to get a new one. You must have had a laugh creating it, but now it is time to be more professional and to use your own name for your email address.

10. Don’t mention your age

Although all the companies say age discrimination doesn’t exist, that is not true. They always consider age when hiring. So, try not to mention it.

11. Make sure all is correct

Making mistakes in a LinkedIn profile is a no-no. Pay attention not only to grammar and spelling, but to style and formatting. Everything should be clear and understandable. Style should be formal and professional.

Try to look at your text as an objective reader, or better yet, show it to someone. Ask a friend, colleague, or professor to read it and correct the mistakes you might have missed.

A LinkedIn profile is much more important now than it was a couple of years ago. More and more professionals, companies, and headhunters create accounts and use them actively every day. Job seekers probably want to look equally experienced and professional on their pages, so spend enough time creating them and don’t be lazy.

Looking for more LinkedIn tips for your job search? Turn to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of William Sarto

William Sarto, guest writer

William Sarto is a marketer and content strategist working at the freelance writing board – gohunters.com. He shares his knowledge and experience in his articles based on current marketing trends and also provides actionable tips for students willing to build successful business careers. He is passionate about all new techniques and methods appearing in digital marketing. Working in one of the most fast changing industries requires many skills from young specialists, so if you have any questions feel free to contact Will @ twitter, Google+

Posted December 18, 2015 by

How to eliminate stress at work

akansha arora

Akansha Arora

During the week, a lot of time is spent at work, and it is important that people have a stress-free environment there. Stress exists commonly at every workplace, and being efficient at your job can help you deal with it. But what about the environment; would you like to sit eight hours a day at a place where you cannot even smile at your neighbor? Of course not! Maintaining good relationships with colleagues creates a stress free environment and enhances your productivity. Here is how you can build good relationships with your coworkers. (more…)

Posted July 16, 2015 by

Preparing for a Job in the Computer Science Industry

Deborah Anderson photo

Deborah Anderson

It is tricky finding a job anytime, but especially in this economy (which goes back to the crash in 2008). Fortunately, straight out of college, with no experience, graduates will find that the going is a bit easier than those with experience.

Why is that? As you gain experience, it sometimes becomes trickier because companies prefer the lower salaries (easier on their budgets) of educated, but inexperienced employees. Understanding that, as you start on your career path, helps you in the long run. (more…)

Posted July 09, 2015 by

The Millennial Makeover Part 3: What Employers Should Know About These Modern Workers

Millennials word cloud

Millennials word cloud. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

When it comes to today’s workforce, there is no doubt that millennials are creating an atmosphere of change in the workplace.  So, who are millennials?  This group was born between 1980 and the year 2000, and reflect a generation with their own career goals, attitudes, and oh yes, their understanding of how to use technology.  For employers to take their companies to the next level, they will need to find ways to recruit and retain millennials, also known as Generation Y. (more…)

Posted April 07, 2015 by

Top 4 Practices for Requesting LinkedIn Recommendations

Thumb up seal illustration design over a white background

Thumb up seal illustration design over a white background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

With LinkedIn currently being the most popular social networking site (second to Facebook), you’d want to make good use of that“300 million active users”. Since LinkedIn is increasingly being used for online recruitment, the “recommendations” feature is one that deserves considerable attention and care dealing with. Just because someone likes your idea of business, doesn’t make them a passable recommender.

According to LinkedIn, “Hiring managers and people searching for new customers and business partners prefer to work with people who come recommended by someone they know and trust.”

Someone “they know and trust” has to be someone you have worked with for a considerable amount of time and who can honestly pass a comment stating a few qualities he remembers about you. (more…)

Posted March 20, 2015 by

To the Rookie Engineer: Tips for Success at Your First ‘Real’ Job

Senior and junior engineers discussing work together in office, senior man pointing at screen

Senior and junior engineers discussing work together in office, senior man pointing at screen. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

You’ve landed your first professional engineering job, and with dress shirt on and sleeves rolled up, you are ready to impress. Of course, everyone knows you’re the rookie — especially you — and you don’t want to sound totally clueless. Take a breath, shake off the doubt and remember these tips. (more…)

Posted February 05, 2015 by

How to become a true leader at your new workplace without being pushy

Michael McPherson photo

Michael McPherson

After getting a job, the next thought of everyone is to get a promotion too. But in order to achieve that, one must gain the trust of the peers. Of course, Millennials are really creative and they always find a way to impose themselves. Now the question is – How do you become a leader without looking too desperate? (more…)