ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 03, 2018 by

Successful variable pay programs: Interview with John Rubino

 

Variable pay programs are rising in popularity. John Rubino, president and founder of Rubino Consulting Services (RCS), knows a lot about this trend and how employers are currently succeeding (and failing) at implementing variable pay programs. Rubino will be a speaker at SHRM 2018 conference, presenting “Successful Variable Pay Programs in Action: A Case Study Using a Proven Eight-Step Design Approach.” I connected with Rubino to get his insight into how to ensure success, what mistakes to avoid, and what it has to do with engaging entry-level employees.  (more…)

Posted January 04, 2018 by

HR metrics from the stay interview

 

Ideally, managers check in with their staff frequently, and not just to measure them against expectations but also to open up a dialogue about how each employee feels regarding their standing at the organization. Unfortunately, not all managers see this kind of check-in as a priority, or even their job. Therefore, it is important for Human Resources to formalize the “stay interview” as a necessary addition to your HR metrics. (more…)

Posted June 26, 2017 by

Archived white papers from College Recruiter

College Recruiter regularly produces white papers that address challenges to the talent acquisition community and in human resource planning, especially professionals hiring entry-level. Below you’ll find our archives. Enjoy!

Gen Z talentGen Z Talent: Understand them to recruit them. All of your college recruitment, from now until 2033, will be tapping Gen Z talent. To say that Gen Z will change the workforce is an understatement. This white paper gives concrete tips for recruiters, TA and HR leaders who related to sourcing, equity, benefits, branding and more–to help attract Gen Z candidates.

 

 

Tweak your summer internshipHow you should tweak your summer internship program: Learn from real-time feedback this spring. Recruiters have been warming up summer intern candidates. There are several things they can listen form, and communicate back, to increase your hiring success. This guide touches on new intern regulations, Gen Z, candidate communication, branding and the single most important factor in delivering a great internship.

 

 

Recruiting can’t be strategic until it shifts to a marketing approach: Here’s how. There is little doubt among strategic recruiting leaders that recruiting must become more like corporate marketing. Marketing receives much stronger executive support and more funding than recruiting. This is because marketing emphasizes data-driven decision-making, market segmentation, powerful branding and being customer-centric. This white paper discusses seven important approaches recruiting should consider borrowing from marketing.

Candidate experience

Making or breaking the entry-level candidate experience: Turning common mistakes into opportunities. Disengage your candidates, and you shrink the pool you have to fish in. Qualified candidates who drop out in the process cost money. Like all of us, candidates have grown to expect great experiences. We teamed up with our friends at TMP Worldwide to create a white paper that will guide in turning common mistakes in the recruitment and selection process, and turn them into opportunities.

Fall college recruitment plansFall 2017 College Recruitment: Emerging trends and challenges. As the school year creeps up, recruiters are looking at their plans, and wondering what to keep from last year and what to change. NAS Recruitment Innovation and College Recruiter teamed up to provide insight into trends and offer advice for talent acquisition teams with a high volume of entry-level hiring needs. We touch on applied tech skills, programmatic advertising, what students are looking for, diversity and much more.

talent war means making happy teamsWinning the talent acquisition war in 2017: There has been a shift in tools and techniques used by employers to attract talent in light of advances in technology and business needs. An effective recruitment strategy should not only align with workforce plans, but also attract top performers. Employers need to respond to key trends when it comes to acquiring talent. This white paper addresses diversifying the workforce, use of analytics, hiring millennials, leveraging mobile technology and responding to the gig economy.

Predictive analytics and interview biasPredictive analytics, bias and interviewing: For centuries, crystal ball gazers and fortune tellers promised to be able to predict the future. They played on our biases and gullibility, and counted on us attributing chance occurrences to their predictive powers. But predictive analytics gives us the ability to reduce uncertainty by applying statistics and determining the probabilities that future patterns will emerge in the behavior of people and systems. This white paper addresses privacy invasion, biases that impede truth, and what to do about bias.

Finding game changer talentDon’t pass on game changer candidates who are still rookies: Game changers are high-impact hires who, soon after joining a team, end up completely transforming it. They quickly move beyond being just top performers because they can be further described using words like stunning, remarkable, exceptional, or extraordinary. Unfortunately, I frequently see recruiters and hiring managers pass over these extraordinary rookies. This white paper addresses identifying rookie game changer candidates.

Evaluate sources effectivelyHow employers evaluate career services, job boards and other sources (And how mobile recruiting changes everything): When College Recruiter began using technology to track candidates who clicked “apply” in 1998, within months, one of the world’s largest hospitality companies was paying us $0.05 per click to drive thousands of students and grads to their career site. And yet today, few employers seem to properly track the sources of candidates who visit their career sites, let alone those who apply, are interviewed and get hired. This white paper addresses flawed assumptions about evaluating sources, and the solution.

 

Posted August 16, 2016 by

Absence of genuine networking discourages job seekers

Business photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

As recruiters and hiring managers search for top talent, it is important they understand how to approach potential job candidates. Employers should think about treating candidates the way they would want to be treated when searching for internships or entry-level jobs. Recruiters and hiring managers can’t assume just because they arrive on college campuses that they will make connections. Taking time to speak with college students who attend networking events shows sincere interest in them and create a favorable impression of an employer. Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org, explains the importance of connecting with candidates in a genuine manner.

“Networking is a way to build professional relationships on a personal level. But many recruiters fail to connect with potential candidates in a meaningful way. Communication is the most important tool in a recruiter’s toolkit. If you can’t explain expectations and describe opportunities in a clear, straightforward way, candidates will go elsewhere. Job seekers aren’t interested in vague, unclear information. They want to know if an opportunity is right for them so help them see if they can fit into the role.

It’s easy to spot common offenders when you’re at networking events. Keep an eye out for card spammers, people who throw their business cards around attempting to reach as many people as possible in a short amount of time. This is not just unprofessional; it’s also offensive.

You can’t build relationships by skimming the surface and trying to get your information in as many pockets as possible. Why would I want to build a trusting relationship with you when you can’t seem to take the time to fully engage with me?

Instead, start a conversation and express a genuine interest in connecting. Being inauthentic and focusing only on the result is off-putting. Don’t force anything; sometimes, there just isn’t a fit. Express what you can offer and how you can help potential candidates.

Follow-up if you sense some interest, but don’t be pushy. There is a human side to business, and talented candidates appreciate when they are treated as a person, not a commodity.”

Want more networking tips? Make your way to our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org

Michael Moradian, Executive Director of HonorSociety.org

Michael Moradian is the Executive Director of HonorSociety.org, an honor society that recognizes academic achievement and provides valuable resources and tools to its members. Connect with Michael and HonorSociety.org on Twitter at @HonorSocietyorg.

Posted August 11, 2016 by

3 events employers won’t want to miss on college campuses

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Recruiters and hiring managers are constantly searching for top talent to fill job openings for employers. A lot of the talent employers need and want can potentially be found on college campuses. Recruiting on campus means taking time from their busy schedules unless employers reach out to companies like College Recruiter for help with creative advertising solutions. If companies decide to visit institutions of higher education face-to-face, what are the most important events for them to attend? For employers pondering this issue, Jennifer Donovan, Director of News and Media Relations at Michigan Technological University, shares three events recruiters and talent acquisition professionals should attend on her campus.

  • Fall and Spring Career Fairs, where thousands of students can meet employers, learn about their companies and career opportunities, and schedule one-on-one interviews with recruiters on the spot.  More than 500 employers attend Michigan Tech’s Career Fairs each year. This is pretty impressive, considering that we are about as remote as you can get, 500 miles north of Detroit and near no other big cities. Our dynamic Career Fairs probably account for Michigan Tech’s astounding 94 percent job placement rate within 6 months of graduation.
  • CareerFest/Industry Days, a series of industry-specific events in a tent in the middle of campus, including hands-on activities, demos, barbecues, lab tours. A very popular and well-attended one is Automotive Days. Others include Steel Days, Rail Days and Mining Days. CareerFest and Industry Days give employers a chance to zero in on the students who are particularly interested in their industry, to inform them and perhaps attract new interest in the field.
  • Design Expo, where student teams display and explain their year-long research projects, ranging from a micro-scale processor that can fix pacemakers in place to a dryer for small-scale hops growers. The projects are industry-sponsored and give the students a chance to work across disciplinary lines to solve real-world employer problems. Employers attending Design Expo could see what innovative problem-solvers Michigan Tech students are trained to be.”
Jennifer Donovan, Director of News & Media Relations at Michigan Technological University

Jennifer Donovan, Director of News & Media Relations at Michigan Technological University

Looking for more advice on recruiting top talent? Visit the College Recruiter blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Jennifer Donovan is Director of News and Media Relations at Michigan Technological University, a STEM-focused state university on the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. She assigns, writes, and edits stories for the university’s news website and daily e-newsletter, Tech Today, and works with news media locally, nationally, and internationally to help them find expert sources and story ideas. In a previous life, she was a newspaper reporter and magazine writer. She lives in Houghton, Michigan, with her two cats.

 

Posted August 02, 2016 by

Graduating in 2017? 3 job search tips you can use right now.

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Photo courtesy of StockUnlimited.com

Despite the soaring temperatures, the fall semester is just around the corner. If you plan to graduate in the upcoming academic year, anticipation (or apprehension) for planning your job search is probably sinking in. Commencement is a date in the distant future, and it feels reasonable to hold your job search until you can actually work full-time, right?

In truth, now is the best time to begin planning your strategy for locating a great employer and opportunity. Following are just a few strategies to gain a jump on your job-search competitors.

  1. Begin by finishing strong.

    Chances are you are currently wrapping up a summer job, volunteer experience, or internship. Now is the ideal time to close this experience by delivering quality work. Connect with your supervisor to schedule a feedback discussion and ask if there will be full-time openings available post-graduation. Also ask if he or she will offer a strong recommendation if contacted. Networking, interning, and building strong references will significantly impact your first job search and beyond.
  2. Employers are identifying talent earlier; help them find you.Recruiting cycles have changed over the past five years. As the economy has picked up, highly skilled applicants (top talent) can be in short supply. Employers are looking for the best possible talent for the job, which is impossible if a competitor has already hired away the best candidates. For many majors, fall is the ideal time to devote the most energy to your job search. Visit your career center immediately when you return to campus for the fall. Carve out time to visit career fairs and employer information sessions to connect with as many recruiters as possible. If employers in your field are not recruiting in the fall, use this time to talk with faculty, parents, and anyone else who may be willing to make a networking introduction. Finally, attend community events, or tackle a fall volunteer project. The connections and skills gained will be valuable for your job search.
  1. Give yourself time to practice and prepare.If you participate in sports, theater, music, or writing, you have probably put in a significant amount of practice time. Similarly, consider putting some significant preparation time into your job search. Start drafting resumes, scheduling mock interviews, and researching employers as soon as possible. Your second or third interview will probably be a lot more relaxed than your first. In addition, pretty much everyone will have suggestions for your first resume draft. Start building your job search skills now.
Mike Caldwell, Director of Business Careers and Employer Development, William & Mary

Mike Caldwell, Director of Business Careers and Employer Development, William & Mary

Want more great job search suggestions before you really dig in and begin searching for jobs? Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube for a steady stream of tips and job postings.

About Mike Caldwell, the author: 

Mike Caldwell serves as the Director of Business Careers and Employer Development at the Cohen Career Center for the College of William & Mary.  He has held leadership roles in local, regional, and national college recruiting organizations including the American Association for Employment in Education and the Utah Association of Career Educators. 

Posted June 26, 2016 by

10 career mistakes to avoid

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

One of your top goals is to have a happy and successful life.

Your career is the key to achieving this goal.

You’ve got a nice degree, have a lovely smile and are ready to work, but there’s one more thing that could stop you from realizing your dreams:

Mistakes.

Some mistakes could harm or even end your career. You have to recognize and avoid them at all costs if you really want to have a successful life.

There are 10 career defining mistakes.

1. Dressing badly at work

Research tells us that what we wear affects how we think. How we dress also affects how other people perceive us.

Sure, you deserve to get the respect you think you deserve and get people to listen to you. People should respect you because you know what you’re talking about.

So why should you wear expensive socks to get people to respect you?

Let me tell you a story.

One day I was on a bus headed to my friend’s house. It’s been a long time since I went to the neighborhood so I wasn’t so sure which stop to get off at. I was constantly looking out at the window, and the gentleman sitting beside me could not help but notice it.

He nicely asked where I was going and if I needed help. I told him where I was going, and he said I should exit in two stops. I thanked him.

A few minutes later, another man sitting behind me said “Actually, you should get off at the next stop.”

I thanked him and exited where he told me, ignoring the advice of the first guy.

Now, you may want to ask me why I chose the second guy’s advice.

As I walk away from the bus stop, I realized I ignored my seatmate’s advice because he was wearing sweatpants, had a dark stain on his T-shirt, and looked like he skipped showering that day. I realized that I chose the second guy’s advice because he wore a collared jacket, well-polished shoes, and designer glasses.

When you dress well at work, people will notice you. Your superiors will notice you, and they would admire you for that. That would open up more opportunities for you.

2. Expressing a rude and negative attitude at work

Even if you’re a highly-talented employee but always express a bad and negative attitude at work, you’ll have a high mountain to climb to advance your career. Many managers hate working with employees who have bad attitudes because they decrease the team morale.

According to studies from Leadership IQ, 87% of employees say that working with somebody with a bad attitude has actually made them want to change jobs. And as much as 89% of new hires who fail within 18 months actually failed because of attitudinal issues, not skills. Bad attitudes also include laziness, tardiness, inappropriate jokes, unresponsive to emails, etc. List all the bad and negative attitudes you have and make a consistent effort to overcome them.

3. Not building good relationships with your colleagues

Bad relationships are bound to happen from time to time. How you deal with them is the most important thing.

Your colleagues are the keys to your happiness at work. If you’re not happy with your coworkers, then you’ll certainly be looking for work soon. I’m a big believer of the phrase “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” If you want your coworkers to be kind and respectful to you, then you have to be kind and respectful to them.

Make sure you remember your coworkers’ names and address them by their names. It’s easy to say happy birthdays to your coworkers on Facebook when you rarely talk to them at work. Make sure you’re doing that important one-on-one conversation. Get on the phone and tell them “Happy Birthday.” Go an extra mile and surprise them with a gift. This little generosity will make you more likable at your workplace.

4. Writing unprofessional emails to colleagues

You know there are some unprofessional things you shouldn’t say to your colleagues in the workplace. The same is true for work emails.

For example, it’s not appropriate to answer a colleague asking you how your job search is going inside your work email. Another example is when your colleague complains about other coworkers and says nasty things about them.

These are discussions you shouldn’t allow inside your work email. I don’t think it’s good to allow it at all whether it’s your personal or work email. You should know that you don’t own your work email, your employer does. Your employer can monitor who you’re communicating with on your work email. You could be in trouble if you’re making inappropriate remarks about sensitive issues at your workplace.

In addition to that, there are some email mistakes that can make you look really unprofessional.

For example:

  • Using informal or curse words you’re not allowed to use at work
  • Rambling in your email instead of getting straight to the point
  • Forgetting to attach files when you say you’ve attached files
  • Spelling the person’s name wrong or using a different name to address the recipient

These email mistakes may not look big to you, but they are serious mistakes that can prevent you from accelerating your career.

5. Making career choices based on earnings

The love of money could lead you down the wrong career path.

I’m not saying “The love of money is the root of all evil.”

You need money to do a lot of things. You probably need money to pay student loans, buy some nice outfits and keep the roof over your head. So you definitely need money. We all do.

But when you choose a career or a job you don’t even enjoy based on your goal to make $90,000 per year, that’s when it becomes a problem. You need to ask yourself:

Does your desire for money match your passion and skills? When you choose a job you’re less passionate about, you’ll be pushing yourself to get things done. And this would be visible in your performance. You should choose a job where you have the skills and abilities to get the job done.

6. Not investing in yourself

If you strip Larry Page of his assets and dump him on the street, I can assure you that he would be back living a comfortable life within a week.

Larry Page has a ton of human capital.

According to Wikipedia“Human capital is the stock of knowledge, habits, social and personality attributes, including creativity, embodied in the ability to perform labor so as to produce economic value.” In other words, human capital is a collection of resources—all the knowledge, talents, skills, abilities, experience, intelligence, training, judgment, and wisdom that are possessed by an individual. If you want to achieve a lot of success in your career, you need a lot of human capital. Focusing on building your human capital is a lot more productive than worrying about “job security.

So how do you build your human capital?

You build up your human capital by investing in yourself through:

  • Improving your skills
  • Acquiring complementary skills
  • Reading educational books
  • Starting healthy habits
  • Building your personal brand
  • Getting a mentor

As you do these things, you’ll become irreplaceable in your organization. You’ll become the go-to person within your company. Many more people will start looking up to you. All these help you accelerate your career.

But when you stop investing in yourself, you become stagnant. Your skills become obsolete.

7. Not maintaining a healthy work-life balance

A poor work-life balance is bad for both the employee (you) and the employer.

People who have a poor work-life balance are more stressed and experience more family conflicts. They also tend to have both mental and physical problems. If your private life is suffering, it will negatively impact your professional life. Your private life comes first. When you experience more problems in your private life, your creativity, engagement and productivity at work will suffer.

The only way to prevent this is to keep a work-life balance.

This may not look like a career mistake to you, but it’s a mistake that can have adverse effects on your career. You should set work hours and stick to them. Don’t work during times when you should be with your family or have set aside times for tending to personal matters which are a priority to you.

8. Not improving your communication skills

“The most important single ingredient in the formula of success is knowing how to get along with people.”—Theodore Roosevelt

The consequences of poor communication are great.

For example, if your communication skills are poor, your message would be hard to understand, and this can lead to serious confusion among your colleagues.

Too much information when it is not needed can also affect the concentration of the listener.

Poor communication becomes more serious when you communicate with customers. If customers are not serviced in the right manner, it would reduce sales, thereby affecting business goals.

Great communication skills help you do well at your job because you’ll be using these skills when requesting information, discussing problems, giving out instructions, and interacting with your colleagues. As a result of demonstrating good communication skills, you’ll enhance your professional image, build sound business relationships, and get more successful responses.

You have to continue sharpening your communication skills if you want to get and stay at the top.

How do you do that?

You sharpen your communication skills by:

  • Striking up conversations with strangers
  • Reading good books
  • Listening to others
  • And engaging in more one-on-one conversations

9. Not networking outside your company

Your network is your net worth.

Your network is your source of job opportunities, potential business partnerships and much more. Your network won’t only find your next job, but it will help you improve your current position.

NETWORKING is the single most powerful marketing tactic to accelerate and sustain success for any individual or organization!”—Adam Small

One of the biggest mistakes many people make is to network when they are only looking for a job. You can’t only rely on people you already know within your current workplace to help you land your dream job. You must always be networking outside of your company, and even your industry.

For example, let’s say you’re a website designer; networking with other website designers alone would limit your opportunities. You should network outside your industry like in the Healthcare, Manufacturing, Agriculture and Energy sectors. People in these sectors could be good references. They could become customers. They might know someone who needs your service.

LinkedIn is a very good place to start networking with people outside your industries.

But your conversation with those people shouldn’t be limited to the web. Take it offline. Do face-to-face meetings with them. That’s how you expand your network and increase your chance of career success.

10. Not serving your network

The truth is the people in your network needs you as much as you need them.

You can’t just expect people in your network to connect you with other people they know. You can’t just expect them to link you up with job opportunities without you giving them some value. You’ll appear selfish if you always expect people to do things for you but offer nothing in return.

The best way to keep people interested in you is to serve them. When you diligently do something good for people, they will want to return the favor, though, your major aim of helping people shouldn’t be to get something in return. The more people you serve, the more your network grows, and the more your network grows, the more opportunities will come your way.

Michael Akinlaby, guest writer

Michael Akinlaby, guest writer

Need more tips for making the best career choices? Visit our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

Michael Akinlaby is a freelance writer and SEO Consultant. He’s the founder of RankRain, an internet marketing agency that specializes in content marketing and Search Engine. 

Posted March 25, 2016 by

4 tips for big impact in college recruiting

When talent acquisition leaders map out their annual college recruiting plans, they should take into account the following four tips, courtesy of The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

This article includes two brief videos, hosted by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter. The videos are part of a 15-video series featuring The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Take time to plan out the process.

Think about branding. How are you making your messaging unique? What will help you stand out in the sea of emails, texts, and flyers on campus? How will you help college students remember you compared to other employers?

2. The early bird gets the worm.

Register for career fairs early. If you register early, you often get the best spot with more exposure to students who attend. If you wait too long before registering, you may not be able to attend.

Similarly, don’t wait for events to occur to reach out to students. Begin the communication process before you show up on campus and before candidates arrive on-site for interviews. Keep the doors of communication open at all times.

3. Think about who will represent you on campus.

Who will you send to represent you at career fairs and other events? This is a crucial choice in the college recruiting process. If you don’t have a well-trained team, and you send hiring managers or other employees, you should prepare these employees as well as possible. Equip them with a broad understanding of the types of skill sets you’re looking for, which positions are available, and the employer brand you’re attempting to display on campus.

Be sure that the representative you send to campus events is able to communicate clearly not only about technical skills but is also able to evaluate candidates’ soft skills.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

4. Follow up.

Following up is key to ensuring success after events end. Many companies ensure huge presence on the day of events but fail to follow up with candidates later. When top candidates weigh their options, employers who have built better relationships stand out.

 

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

Posted February 21, 2016 by

Using social media in college recruiting

Every college recruiter knows that social media is a golden means for reaching today’s college students and recent graduates when recruiting top talent. But not every employer utilizes social media to its full advantage in its college recruiting program.

How can recruiters and talent acquisition professionals partner with their content marketing teams to use social media to drive traffic to their college recruiting pages or websites? How can social media become not just a tool for engagement with college students and recent grads but a true means to an end? How can recruiters use social media to ultimately increase the number of job applications completed on their websites, and in turn, the number of quality candidates hired?

Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, answers this question directly in this 7-minute video hosted by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

College recruiters and talent acquisition leaders need to wade through the pool of social media apps and sites and be selective about how they invest their time and energy. With countless options available, the question recruiters need to ask is which social media sites will truly drive traffic to our website?

Rothberg explains that while Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat, and a host of other image-based social media sites are engaging for Gen Z students, there isn’t adequate research to suggest that these sites drive significant traffic to companies’ blogs or websites. They are, however, great social media platforms to use for engaging with high school and college students.

Rothberg also discounted LinkedIn as a true social media site. He believes that although it began as a social media site, it evolved into something more like a job board. With 80% of its revenue generated from its talent solutions division, it’s clear that many professional job seekers find value in posting their resumes on LinkedIn and networking professionally through the site.

Twitter can be used to drive traffic to a company’s website, but it can also be used to engage with followers. This is a great tool for college recruiters who want to post their own content, which drives traffic to their blog/website, but simultaneously want to send direct messages to candidates who ask questions or host weekly Twitter chats with college students and applicants. Rothberg mentioned the success College Recruiter has had by hosting two Twitter accounts, promoting its own blog content (which drives traffic to the blog), and interacting with clients and college students/recent grads on Twitter.

Rothberg believes Facebook is less effective; only about 4% of the people who like a company’s Page on Facebook will see the content posted unless the company pays to boost posts and promotes its own Facebook content. If the content is very engaging, and many of its Facebook followers share and like the content, it will be seen and viewed by more followers and promoted more by Facebook.

Lastly, Rothberg discussed the benefits of using YouTube as a social media site and posting videos and webinars. Many times, YouTube is discounted as a social media site because it’s simply viewed as a storehouse for videos. However, today’s college students and recent grads share and view videos frequently. For college recruiters, YouTube can be a great outreach tool. YouTube also allows employers to embed cards, or links, to their own websites, blogs, and other sites.

During the month of March, College Recruiter’s blog will feature multiple articles and videos on using social media in college recruiting. Be sure to follow our blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. We are committed to creating a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and graduates to excellent entry-level jobs and internships. Why not let College Recruiter assist you in the recruiting process?

Posted July 07, 2015 by

Keywords Are Killing Us – Your Searching Strategy is Missing Top Talent

Searching the sea of candidates to find the best fit is not easy. Many recruiting tools give recruiters options to look up keywords across candidate applications and resumes to narrow the field of possible candidates. However, these keywords may be making matters worse instead of better. The main goal of keywords are to group the candidates that your recruiter wants, more people interested than can fill, puts best candidates first to make it easier for recruiters to find the candidates. Find out why and what you can do to find the best candidates.

In this recorded webinar, Andrea McEwen-Henderson, National Account Manager from College Recruiter and David Sarnowski, Customer Experience Manager from HarQen discusses why keyword searches are problematic, as well as giving options to help you find the best candidates quicker.

(more…)