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Posted April 11, 2016 by

10 job interview questions you shouldn’t ask

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Congratulations! You’ve landed an entry-level job interview. Now, it is time to prepare for the big day, which includes creating some interview questions to ask if you get the chance. Keep in mind, though, there are questions college students and recent graduates should not ask their potential employers during interviews.

1. How much does the job pay?

Asking about salary in an interview tells the interviewer you’re more concerned with money than the actual job. I’m not saying money isn’t important, but save this discussion for after you have received a job offer.

2. How many days of vacation do I get?

It’s not wise for job seekers to ask about vacation time before landing entry-level jobs. Focusing on time off without a job offer leaves an impression that you lack commitment to work.

3. Can I take time off during exams?

This question might indicate to employers that college students have trouble handling multiple responsibilities, or that school is more important than work. Even though school work is a priority for students, employers are considering what is important to them.

4. Can I use social media at work?

It’s probably obvious to most (if not all) of you why job seekers shouldn’t ask this question. Interviewers would feel you’re more concerned with your Facebook friends and Twitter followers than succeeding at the position you’ve applied for.

Businessman working from home on laptop courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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5. Can I work from home?

Asking this question can leave an interviewer wondering if you have an issue with coming to work regularly. Wait until proving yourself for a while on a new job before requesting to work from home.

6. What kind of job is this?

Please don’t ask this question. If you do, you might as well walk out of the interview. The interviewer expects you to know what kind of job you’ve applied for. You can find this information in the job posting and on the company website.

7. When will I get promoted?

Asking this question makes the assumption that a job seeker has won the position, which won’t impress the interviewer. Remember, you need to get the job first so concentrate on that. With a good attitude and hard work, you may eventually earn a promotion.

8. Do you want my references?

The interviewer is concerned about you, not anyone else. It’s great you have references but save them for later, and focus on nailing the interview.

9. Are there any background checks?

Asking potential employers about background checks raises a red flag in their minds that you have something to hide. If you’re sure of yourself as a job candidate, a background check or drug screen won’t bother you.

10. Did I get the job?

While I’m sure you can’t wait to find out if you got the job, avoid asking if you did in the interview. Unless you’re told otherwise, follow up to learn the employer’s decision. Don’t follow up too soon. It’s okay to ask the employer at the end of the interview about the timeline for filling the position—this lets you know how long to wait before calling to check on your status as an applicant.

In a nutshell, job seekers should wait until after they receive employment offers before asking questions related to issues primarily benefiting themselves.

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Posted January 27, 2015 by

7 Steps to Choosing the Right Master’s Program for You

3d image of mortar board with degree against white background

3d image of mortar board with degree against white background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Going to graduate school to work on a master’s degree is an exciting way to expand career options for the future. The first challenge is to find the best master’s program for you. Here are a few considerations that may help.

Requirements.

It is usually a good idea to compare graduate programs to find the one that best suits your learning style. Some require a thesis or thesis essays to be written. Others include an internship or practicum. The courses required and delivery style will also be worth noting. (more…)

Posted December 05, 2014 by

5 Tips for Finishing a Degree While You Work or Travel

College student reading outdoors lying in the grass

College student reading outdoors lying in the grass. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Not every high school student or young adult is set on acquiring a college diploma through the traditional four-year college experience, or right away. And with so many options to obtain and finish degrees at your disposal, you simply don’t have to. Whether it’s because you’re already working hard at your own start-up or you’ve just secured the internship of your dreams, you may find that an undergraduate or graduate degree is something you are only interested in pursuing on the side.

If you know a college degree is important, but you don’t want to take a break from the life you’re living to get it, here are five tips to finishing your college degree while you travel the world, intern for public radio, or slave away at your very own tech start-up. (more…)

Posted September 04, 2014 by

Working Entry Level Jobs that are Nocturnal? 6 Tips to Help You Make it Through

Young professionals and others who work entry level jobs at night can get six tips on how to survive them in the following post.

You don’t need a science degree to figure out that people need sleep. But countless research points to the same conclusion: insufficient sleep can cause a wide range of physical and mental health problems, from poor judgment to depression to heart disease. And ideally, humans should get the sleep they need at night and stay

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Posted May 27, 2014 by

Have a Bad Candidate Experience When Searching Jobs for Recent College Graduates? 4 Ways to Put Your Job Search Back in Your Hands

If you’ve had a bad candidate experience when searching jobs for recent college graduates, the following post discusses four ways to help you put your search back in your hands.

With every job interview – some good, some not-so-good – comes a different candidate experience. Regardless of the organization, the recruiter and the position… what you take away from each experience is what matters. What other opportunities are available? What should you expect next time? How can you leverage

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