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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 22, 2019 by

2 tips for how to stand out by following up after your job interview

Congratulations. You found a job of interest to you, applied, were granted an interview, and were interviewed. You’ve got a ways to go before you get hired, but how do you increase your chances of advancing from your first interview to the second and even further rounds?

Following up with the recruiters and hiring managers who interviewed you is key. You want to be sure that they know that you remain interested, not just as you’re walking out the door but in the days, weeks, and maybe even months to come. But be sure that you follow-up and don’t cross the line to be perceived as been a stalker. Some contact is good. Daily contact is bad.

A couple of tangible tips:

  • Bring with you to the interview some pre-stamped envelopes with thank you note cards. Immediately after you’re interviewed and have left the building, handwrite a quick thank you note to each person who interviewed you with a reference in each note to something that they said so they’ll know that your note was customized. Get those into the local mail that same day. The interviewers will likely receive the note the next business day, which will really impress them.
  • Once every week or two, email the interviews a note to confirm your continuing interest and provide them with a link or attach a scan of an article etc. that you’ve seen that may be of interest to them, such as something interesting that the press wrote about their company or one of their vendors or customers. You’d be surprised how many recruiters and hiring managers will assume that silence from a candidate indicates lack of interest.
Posted July 07, 2016 by

How to network in the workplace

Two businessmen talking and smiling photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Congratulations on landing your new entry-level job or internship! Perhaps you landed it through networking. If so, that means you understood how to approach interacting with family, friends, and/or recruiting and talent acquisition professionals during your job search.

Now it’s time to transition from networking to find a job to networking in the workplace. This is an opportunity to demonstrate your skills and qualities and learn from established employees who can help you along the way. Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services and LEEP Center Adviser at Clark University, explains how new hires should approach networking in the workplace.

“The first step is to establish yourself as a hard-working, competent, young professional. Making a good first impression in your new role will get your colleagues’ attention and increase the likelihood they will be willing to assist in your career development. At the same time, you need to assimilate into the culture of your organization and begin to create collegial working relationships. If you begin networking too early, it may appear you are too focused on your future rather than your current role.

Once you have established yourself, identify someone one level above you whose position or career path you’re interested in. Start with people you already know. Your goal is to secure an informational interview where you ask questions about the professional’s career trajectory and solicit advice on your potential goals. People generally like to talk about themselves and like to give advice, so you should get a positive response as long as you are polite and professional.

Another goal of that conversation should be expanding your network by asking the professional for names of other professionals they can introduce you to. Etiquette is important in this process so remember that written communication should be formal and professional, and follow-up thank you notes are essential. Above all, be willing to listen and be open to the advice you receive.”

Need more help with networking? Learn more on our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center

Vickie Cox-Lanyon, Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center

Vickie Cox-Lanyon is Director of Career Services / Graduate School Adviser and Assistant Director of the LEEP Center at Clark University. Cox-Lanyon provides career and academic guidance to students and alumni throughout their career development process. She has been in the field of career services since 1997 and is a member of the National Career Development Association, the National Association of Colleges and Employers, and the Liberal Arts Career Network, through which she participates in annual professional development activities. She holds a BA in Psychology from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and an MS in Psychology from the University of Rhode Island.

Posted January 07, 2015 by

College Graduates: Tools You Need to Land a Job

Man getting ready for a job interview

Man getting ready for a job interview. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Recent graduates face a competitive job market, and arming yourself with a degree and a polished resume may not be enough to land a job. To be a viable candidate in this market, you need to invest in the tools that give you an edge. Here are just a few tools to consider investing in: (more…)

Posted October 02, 2014 by

Searching for an Entry Level Job or Internship Using Social Media? How to Approach It

It is no secret that social media is a huge part of modern day communication.  While many people use it for personal reasons, some also use it for their job searches.  If you’re looking for an entry level job or an internship, social media can help you learn more about job opportunities and companies that you are interested in working for.  However, job seekers must be careful how they present themselves online to be taken seriously by potential employers.  Let’s take a look at some ways to approach your search for career opportunities. (more…)
Posted August 20, 2014 by

College Students, Are Your Jobs as Interns Over? 5 Tips for Writing Thank You Notes

As college students finish their jobs as interns, they should remember to show appreciation for their experiences.  In the following post, learn five tips to use when writing thank you notes.

Featured: Featured I was recently featured in a FORBES article that got a lot of great feedback from students. One student was reading it as she was finishing up her internship in Los Angeles and she emailed me some great questions about what to do towards the end of your internship. Here are some tips for Thank

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Posted June 12, 2014 by

9 Reasons You’re Not Landing an Entry Level Job and Ways to Succeed in Your Search

Are you wondering why you are not landing an entry level job?  The following post shares nine reasons, along with ways to find success during your search.

No job or internship search is perfect. We’re going to make mistakes. One mistake you can’t afford to make as a during an active job search, however: with every application, you (the “seller”) must pay close attention to what the employer (the “buyer”) wants…

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Posted May 20, 2014 by

Work Experience Essential to College Students Looking for Jobs in Accounting and Finance

If you are a college student who wants a job in accounting or finance, make sure you have some work experience under your belt.

According to a new survey from Accountemps, 83% of chief financial officers (CFOs) interviewed said it is important for students to gain work experience in the field during their college years if they are hoping to compete for entry-level accounting and finance positions upon graduation. (more…)

Posted May 16, 2014 by

The Correct Use of Email in Your Job Search

Blue square button for email

Blue square button for email. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Technology can be a great tool. Email is fast and often times efficient, but in today’s society it is often overused and/or used incorrectly in a job search. Not only have we seen the incorrect use of email cost candidates a job offer, we’ve also seen it slam a door on a relationship with a future employer.

We thought it might be helpful to break the interviewing process down and discuss the dos and don’ts when it comes to email: (more…)

Posted May 14, 2014 by

Some Employees Have Not Searched for a New Job in Years

In recent years, it seems like some employees have not been looking for a new job.  Learn how long it has been for some, get some advice on succeeding into today’s job search, and more in the following post. (more…)
Posted October 21, 2013 by

Competing for Entry Level Jobs? 20 Ways to Become the Number One Option for Potential Employers

When competing for entry level jobs, it’s important to show potential employers that you are the best candidate for the job.  In the following post, learn 20 ways to make yourself the number one option amongst the competition.

Looking for advice on how to stand out from your job search competition? As an executive search consultant and civic-connector, I’ve conducted hundreds of interviews and networking meetings. Here are some of my observations from years on the job, insights you can use to beat out your competition. Editor’s note: We see a theme

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