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Posted April 30, 2016 by

3 employment options for recent grads

Graduation male student with different careers to choose courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Tom Wang/Shutterstock.com

Considering the economy and technology are on the upswing, many recent grads start their careers while studying at college. And we are not talking about part-time at the campus café; college students often have jobs that bring them valuable professional experience, and ensure a tangible level of income. So when graduation day comes, college students are not a bunch of scared rookies but professionals with decent backgrounds in their fields. Nevertheless, there is still a question: what form of employment is worth the effort? Startups and freelancing look more attractive, yet they conceal many tricky pitfalls. As for good old full-time employment, it needs serious reshaping and improvement to attract young professionals. There are at least three employment options for recent grads, but which option is best?

It is all in the mindset

According to recent surveys, three out of five students expect they will be able to work remotely, and less than a half of 18-29 year olds employed are working full-time. It is not a crisis or an unexpected epidemic given that youth follow the elder generations; Gen Z (this is how sociologists and HR experts categorize people born in the mid to late 1990s through the 2010s) had a Millennials rise as a model to follow. The same surveys indicate about 30% of Gen Y started businesses while in college, and about 91% are considering changing their current jobs within three years. With this in mind, we can tell the younger generation has been raised in the spirit of freedom and solopreneurship, now demanding a different approach from HR departments and recruiters. Yet, the last say goes to employees, and here are things they should consider before accepting job offers and jump into their careers or solo businesses. Let’s take a look at each of the following three employment options for recent grads to consider.

Start a company

Starting your own company is rather challenging, though many examples have proven it to be successful. The idea is to push your passion into profit and convince others that your business is worth all the efforts.

Startup advantages:

– Working for yourself
– Creating great financial opportunities
– Implementing your own ideas
– Great life experience

Startup disadvantages:

– Tough competition
– Investments needed
– Lack of “job security”
– Startup is riskier and more costly

Understand that starting your own business calls for an award-winning concept necessary to enter the entrepreneurial world. Those who choose to make such a living should be patient, as niche startups are likely to bear fruit no sooner than 12 months after launch.

Freelancing

Freelancing is actually quite similar to starting your own business. On the one hand, it comes rather risky though you do not have to invest. On the other hand, you are free to follow your commitments with passion and drive.

Freelancing advantages:

– Benefit from flexible hours (Sleep until noon, if you like. No one will ever bother you unless the project deadline is approaching)
– Take control of your customers and tasks (Choose whom you are going to work with and opt for the most appealing tasks)
– Keep all the profits (You are the boss. You don’t have to split the profit or pay salaries, yet be aware of taxation and other expenses)
– Stay wherever you want (Freelancing is perfect for a travelling enthusiast)

Freelancing disadvantages:

– Lack of steady workloads (At some point, you can suffer from the lack of orders unless you’ve managed to create a solid customer base)
– Insecurity (There are numerous occasions when freelancers are not paid or become victims of fraud)
– You pay for yourself (No social package or any other benefits provided by the employer. You’re the boss, remember?)

Full-time job

The most influential thing about a full-time job is a contract and guaranteed salary in addition to employer’s benefits, a workplace provided, and more. However, the current economic situation will hardly provide you with total job and financial security, while being hopeless in enabling your professional development.

Full-time advantages:

– Steady salary (Your monthly payment is guaranteed)
– Governmental and social securities (Your contact is protected by social and economic policies)
– Constant workload (You will never witness a lack of tasks and duties)

Full-time disadvantages:

– Heavy workload (Too much work is not good for you. It results in stress and health problems in addition to a lack of personal time)
– Lack of professional development (You can stick to a routine without the slightest chance to develop your skills)
– Not enough salary (You will hardly find employees who are satisfied with their monthly salaries. Always keep in mind that every employer is eager to cut down on expenses. Salary is a key point in the list of expenses)

Each working arrangement comes with pros and cons. The best way to make up your mind is to consider every point we have discussed. No matter what you choose, get pleasure from what you are doing and never hesitate to make a crucial step and change your life for the better.

Need more advice regarding employment options? Search for jobs with College Recruiter and check out our blog. Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Justine Thomas, guest writer

Justine Thomas, guest writer

Justine Thomas is a blogger and freelance writer. Her main interests are foreign languages, psychology, and fitness. Currently, she is working at educational company, Edubirdie.com, as a consulting editor.

Posted September 04, 2015 by

What percentage of college students graduate with at least one internship?

 

One of my favorite sources of information about all things recruiting is ERE Daily. I know most of the people who have worked there, who currently work there, and I hope to know most of the people who have yet to work there.

Occasionally, however, they publish an article which includes erroneous information. An example was an article about the so-called talent gap between the hard and soft skills offered by college students and recent graduates and those preferred and presented by employers.  (more…)

Posted December 08, 2014 by

How a Student Can Earn an Extra Buck in the Internet

Melissa Burns

Melissa Burns

Despite what you see in the movies, students’ lives do not consist entirely of partying, getting wasted and suffering from hangovers afterwards. There are also such things as actual learning and earning some extra money to support yourself through college, with the latter generally being the major concern.

However, the fact that we live in the Internet age makes things a whole lot easier, because it opens up many opportunities to earn decent amounts of cash without wasting a lot of time and getting an official part-time job. You may not only find an opportunity to telecommute, you may start your own small business! Here we will talk about some of these opportunities, allowing you to support yourself without taking a break from your studies. (more…)

Posted November 04, 2014 by

How Students Can Make More Money with Paid Surveys

Melissa Burns

Melissa Burns

The question that most students probably ask themselves most often is this: Where to get some extra cash if there is no opportunity for full-time employment? What free time they have is arranged irregularly, which makes getting even a part-time job problematic.

But there is a legitimate way of making decent money working odd hours without spending too much time on it – namely, paid surveys.

However, how much you make this way depends on your resourcefulness and knowledge of certain tricks – so read carefully. (more…)

Posted May 27, 2014 by

7 Tips for Making Your Internship a Success

John Challenger of Challenger, Gray & Christmas

John Challenger of Challenger, Gray & Christmas

With roughly one-in-four employers recruiting entry-level workers from the pool of current and former interns, it is more important than ever for college and university students and recent graduates to perform well in these employment proving grounds.  Unfortunately, many of those embarking on summer internship programs in the coming days and weeks could fail to make a positive impression on their employers, according to one workplace authority.

“Thousands of young people will participate in paid and unpaid internships this summer.  While most will do a good job meeting the responsibilities laid out for them, many will not take the extra steps required to ensure that they stand out, thus increasing the chances of becoming a permanent employee down the road,” said John A. Challenger, chief executive officer of global outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

Internships are an essential stepping stone to full-time employment for entry-level job seekers.  In a recent survey of 100 human resources professionals by Challenger, Gray & Christmas, 26 percent of respondents said that internships are the leading source from which entry-level candidates are recruited and hired. (more…)

Posted April 18, 2014 by

36% of Employers Say Specific/Technical Skills Most Important for Grads to Possess

Most Important Skills for Grads to PossessThe largest portion (36 percent) of employers recently surveyed said that specific/technical skills related to the job were the most important.

In the survey conducted among 100 human resources professionals in early April by global outplacement and coaching consultancy Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., the employers also stated that soft skills like ability to work within a team and communication skills are also among the most important for graduates to possess. Ability to work in a team environment was selected by 14 percent of respondents.  Surprisingly, having strong written/verbal communication skills was selected by just 8.0 percent or respondents, and problem solving was the most important skill for just 4.0 percent.

 

Posted April 17, 2014 by

College Recruiter and Other Job Boards Highest Source of Hire for College Grads

Sources of Entry-Level Hires

Sources of Entry-Level Hires

About one in four employers recently surveyed said their most of their entry-level recruits were hired through an internship program.  In the survey conducted among 100 human resources professionals in early April by global outplacement and coaching consultancy Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., the employers surveyed said that the same percentage — 25.5 percent — came from College Recruiter and other online job boards.  Just over 20 percent of companies said on-campus recruiting visits and job fairs were the primary source for their entry-level recruits. Unclear from the survey were the sources of hire for the internship program. Clearly some came from job boards, others on-campus recruiting, job fairs, and other such sources.

“Soon-to-be graduates cannot expect to hand out a few resumes at job fairs and reply to some online postings and simply wait for a phone call or email.  As our survey results show, job fairs and online job boards have their place, but to be successful a well-rounded strategy is required,” said Challenger.

“One of the most important elements of a successful job search, for both entry-level job seekers and their more-experienced counterparts, is networking and meeting face-to-face with people who can help advance the job search.  College graduates who believe they are too young to have an effective network are simply wrong.  Parents, professors, former internship supervisors and even college and former high school classmates can be valuable sources when it comes to building and expanding one’s network,” said Challenger. (more…)

Posted April 16, 2014 by

Boom! 64% of Employers Plan to Hire Recent College Grads

Employers Planning to Hire GradsConditions are expected to improve for college graduates entering the job market this spring, as the economic recovery continues to gain momentum.  In fact, nearly two out of three employers surveyed by a leading employment consulting firm plan to hire from among this year’s crop of 1.8 million grads.

In the survey conducted among 100 human resources professionals in early April by global outplacement and coaching consultancy Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., 64 percent of respondents said their companies plan to recruit from the pool of graduates entering the job market this spring.  Twelve percent of respondents said that while they have recruited college graduates in the past, there are no plans to do so this year.  About 10 percent said they never recruit college graduates, preferring candidates with “a few years” of work experience.

“This is the first year we have conducted this survey. So, while we do not have comparable data from previous years, the fact that a majority of respondents reported plans to hire college graduates is certainly a positive sign for this year’s pool of entry-level job seekers. This, combined with continued improvements in the overall economy, contributed to an optimistic outlook for this year’s graduates,” said John A. Challenger, chief executive officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas. (more…)

Posted November 22, 2013 by

47% of College Grads Start Work In Field Different From Their Major

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Rosemary Haefner of Careerbuilder

Choosing your college major is a significant life decision, but a new study from CareerBuilder suggests it may not necessarily define your career path. Nearly half (47 percent) of college-educated workers said their first job after college was not related to their college major. Thirty-two percent of college-educated workers reported that they never found a job related to their college major. Among more seasoned workers – those ages 35 and older – that number is 31 percent.

The national survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from August 13 to September 6, 2013, and included a representative sample of 2,134 workers across industries and company sizes who graduated from college.

“A college education will give you a significant advantage in the job market. In a tough economic climate, college graduates must be flexible and open to taking positions outside their area of study. Taking the knowledge gained in college and branching out with it in unexpected directions is common after graduating,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of Human Resources at CareerBuilder. “In most cases, workers who went into a new field ended up liking the new industry. Odds are you won’t get that dream job right out of school, but it’s important to remember that there are many different paths.” (more…)

Posted July 19, 2013 by

10 Hardest To Fill Jobs

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

More than a third (35 percent) of hiring managers currently have positions that have remained open for 12 weeks or longer, according to new research. Which jobs are the hardest to fill and in need of workers now? Which professions are experiencing strong job growth and present good opportunities for the unemployed, underemployed and workers looking to make a career change?

“Although the recession created an abundant pool of readily-available, unemployed talent that still exists today, employers are struggling to find new employees for technology-related occupations, sales, healthcare and a variety of other areas,” said Brent Rasmussen, President of CareerBuilder North America. “Two in five employers (41 percent) reported that they continuously recruit throughout the year, so that they have candidates in their pipeline in case a position opens up down the road. The skills gap that exists for high-growth, specialized occupations will become even more pronounced in the years to come, prompting the need to place a greater emphasis on reskilling workers through formal education and on-the-job training.” (more…)