• Can you really hire unpaid interns, with new rules issued by Dept of Labor?

    February 02, 2018 by


    Since 2010, employers have relied on a six-part test, issued by the U.S. Department of Labor, to determine whether their interns could be classified as unpaid interns or whether they should be actually classified as paid employees. In January 2018, the DOL issued changes to that test.

    We spoke with five experts in employment law, talent acquisition and HR to discuss what the new rules mean and what employers can, or should, do now. Our panelists were Heather Bussing, California employment lawyer and contributor to HRExaminer.com; Ben Gotkin, Executive Director of the Association of Talent Acquisition Professionals, or ATAP; Steven Rothberg President and Founder of College Recruiter; Dr. Robert Shindell, President and CEO of Intern Bridge; and Alexandra Levit is a Talent Consultant, Workforce Expert, Author, and Chair of DeVry University’s Career Advisory Board. Continue Reading

  • Recruitment methods for non-traditional students

    January 29, 2018 by


    The entry-level talent pool increasingly consists of “non-traditional students.” Recruitment methods and strategies that narrowly focus on attracting talent from top schools, or from a short list of degrees, no longer provide employers with the workforce they need to grow. Employers should become more aware of who non-traditional students are, and how talent from alternative pools brings value. Continue Reading

  • Sourcing and evaluation: Employers’ flawed assumptions, and how mobile recruiting changes everything

    June 28, 2017 by


    This blog is an excerpt of Steven Rothberg’s white paper, “How Employers Evaluate Career Services, Job Boards, and Other Sources, and How Mobile Recruiting Changes Everything.”

    Read the entire white paper here (no need to register to download).

    Few employers properly track candidate sources

    The technology that allows an advertiser to track a consumer from their click on an ad to the advertiser’s website, and ultimately to a purchase, has existed since the mid-1990’s. For example, when College Recruiter began using this technology in 1998, within months, one of the world’s largest hospitality companies was paying us $0.05 per click in return for driving thousands of students and recent graduates a month to apply on their career website. Continue Reading

  • Jobs posted to College Recruiter programmatically distributed to 27 other high quality, high traffic, niche career sites

    September 12, 2016 by

    Minneapolis, MN (September 12, 2016) — Interactive recruitment media company College Recruiter announced today that it has further enhanced its programmatic job distribution system to drive significant, added value to the small, medium, and large corporate, non-profit, and government employers who advertise their internships, seasonal work, part-time jobs, and full-time career opportunities by posting those jobs to the college and university students and recent graduates who search the job board, CollegeRecruiter.com.

    College Recruiter founder Steven Rothberg

    College Recruiter founder Steven Rothberg

    “According to chief executive officer Peter Weddle of the Association of Talent Acquisition Solutions — our industry’s trade association — there are now some 150,000 job boards primarily targeting candidates in the U.S.,” said College Recruiter president and founder Steven Rothberg. “But the vast majority of those are pretty much cookie cutter sites without any direct, employer clients. The jobs advertised on those sites were originally posted to another site which then distributed the jobs to lesser job boards. When candidates click to apply to a job on those lesser sites, they’re typically taken to the originating job board and from there they’re often taken to the employer’s site so candidates click, click, click, and sometimes click some more.”

    “College Recruiter is different,” continued Rothberg. “We’re passionate about the candidate experience and never want a candidate to click from our site to another to another or from another site to our site to another and perhaps another. That’s awful for the candidate experience and poisons the relationship between them and the employer before it even really starts, so it is also awful for the recruiter experience. When candidates see a job posted to College Recruiter, we send that candidate straight to the application page on College Recruiter or, more commonly, straight to the employer’s website to apply. And if our fully automated, programmatic systems see that we’re not driving enough candidates to apply to a job, we will distribute that job to some of the highest quality, highest traffic, niche career sites on the web. Unlike the terrible candidate experience adopted by our competitors, our passion for the candidate and recruiter experience extends to the other job boards with which we partner. Candidates that see the job on our partner sites and click to apply go straight to the application page on College Recruiter or, more commonly, straight to the employer’s website to apply.” Continue Reading

  • Analytics and data in recruiting: Don’t let competitors steal your talent

    September 07, 2016 by
    Group of businesspeople at work

    Group of businesspeople at work. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    Five years ago, Steven Rothberg, founder of CollegeRecruiter.com, rarely heard employers talk about using analytics or data when making hiring decisions.

    “Now I can hardly walk down the hall at a recruiting conference or spend 30 minutes on a call with a client and not hear some reference to it,” says Rothberg. “There is no doubt that HR professionals recognize the value in using data-driven decisions, but probably fewer than one percent of employers are good at it.”

    Ian Cook, Head of Workforce Solutions at Visier, a company that develops cloud-based applications that enable HR professionals to answer workforce strategy questions, talked about the impact of analytics, specifically to campus recruiting and the hiring of recent college grads, in the College Recruiter article Analytics, data changing way employers recruit, hire college graduates.

    “This is no longer a nice to have,” Cook said in that article, referring to the use analytics and data to drive recruiting and hiring decisions. “Everyone knows the game has changed, and if you are not using analytics to play the best you can then you will be left behind.”

    The reality is, if you are not using analytics and data, your competitor who already is using analytics to recruit and hire recent college grads and entry-level job seekers probably has already interviewed or hired that candidate that may have once been interested in your company.

    “If you don’t dive into analytics, then you are increasing the likelihood that your competitor will be able to scoop up all the great talent that you need,” says Cook.

    The move to using big data and analytics for campus recruiting, hiring recent college grads or entry-level employees has been met with resistance by both small and large employers. Many of those employers believe their campus recruiting efforts, combined with a strong social media outreach, and robust campus careers page, drives success recruiting recent college grads or entry-level job seekers.

    “We do hear the ‘our college recruiting program is a well-oiled machine’ from some employers,” says Rothberg.

    But at the same time, both small and large employers are now successfully using analytics and data to drive hiring decisions. That list includes these three well-known companies:

    Enterprise Rent-A-Car: Dylan Schweitzer of Enterprise Rent-A-Car spoke publicly about how they use data to track their sources of hire and that allows them to reduce their spend on schools, job boards, and other sources which are more expensive than their other sources.

    Lockheed Martin: Alton Fox of Lockheed Martin mentioned at TalentBlend 2016 that they’re shifting more and more of their university relations budget toward job boards and other virtual sourcing tools because the cost-of-hire is far lower AND the employees are far more productive.

    Uber: Uber tests, tests, and tests some more with different job titles, geographic targeting, job descriptions, landing pages, and more. They work with a wide variety of media partners and many of those partners are paid on a performance basis, so if the ads they run work well then Uber keeps working with the media partner and probably increases how much they spend with that partner, says Rothberg. If the ads don’t work well, Uber shifts those resources to better performing sourcing tools.

    Using analytics and data to make recruiting and hiring decisions should be viewed as a way to bridge the gaps that can be cause with human oversight or human error. Analytics and data also provide a unique insight that has never been available before. So why not use analytics and data when making hiring decisions?

    Many organizations are focused on analyzing candidates, such as by resume parsing or extended social profile analyses, in order to improve their likelihood of landing a great hire, says Cook. Others are taking a more strategic approach and attempting to analyze the workflow and outputs of the recruiting function.

    They are looking at questions such as:

    • Can we recruit faster?
    • Are we spending our sourcing dollars in the right place?
    • If we change up our process, do fewer people abandon their applications?
    • Which sources consistently produce employees who stay and perform?

    These are complex questions involving multiple data sources, but they are all are aligned to ensuring the function is delivering what the business needs.

    “Predominantly, we see industries that need to recruit a lot of high value talent being early adopters or ahead of the game when it comes to talent analytics,” says Cook. “Organizations that hire lots of software engineers or technical medical staff or specialists with financial skills understand the value that comes from being data-driven as opposed to following the old ‘post and hope’ model.”

    College Recruiter has been using analytics and data for years, providing employers with specific and organized reports to help achieve their recruiting and hiring goals. But many recruiters and HR professionals simply fear change, or the challenge of implementing analytics into the decision-making process.

    “The biggest reason that I see employers resisting the use of data and analytics is the fear of math,” says Rothberg.

    Here is an example: Rothberg recently asked the head of HR for a 5,000-employee company if they would like a detailed proposal that walked through the outcomes of the various recruitment advertising packages being considered. This proposal included projections on the number of candidates that would be sent to that company’s applicant tracking system from College Recruiter, how many would apply, how many would be hired, time-to-hire, and cost-per-hire.

    “She asked what I needed and I asked her how many people she wanted to hire and over how many months,” recalls Rothberg. “She didn’t know. I asked how many applications she would expect to generate for every 1,000 clicks we sent to her ATS. She didn’t know. I asked how many hires she would make for every 100 applications. She didn’t know. As unfortunate as all of that was, she didn’t want to know. She was the head of HR for a 5,000 person company and she didn’t want to admit that math scared her.”

    Don’t let analytics scare you. Employers, both large and small, are using analytics to drive talent decisions. Dive in, before your competitors steals your next great hire.

    “We can always find ways to save a little money, hire a little faster, diversify a little more, and hire people who perform a little better and are retained for a little longer,” says Rothberg. “Data and analytics help us identify those areas where we can improve, whether there is only minor or vast room for improvement.”

    Wondering how analytics can help drive your recruiting decisions and successes? Contact College Recruiter today to learn more, and be sure to Check out our blog and follow us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

  • Will robots replace fast food workers?

    August 29, 2016 by
    Robot works with cloud computer. Technology concept

    Robot works with cloud computer. Technology concept. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    I was recently asked by a journalist whether robots are likely to replace the cashiers, cooks, and others who are employed fast food restaurants. As with most things in life, the answer isn’t so black-and-white.

    Many of the students and some of the recent grads who use College Recruiter are employed by fast food restaurants. In fact, one of our employees was a “sandwich artist” at Subway prior to joining us.

    There’s no doubt that automation will continue to impact the number and types of jobs in fast food restaurants but I don’t buy the argument that digital ordering, kiosks, tablets, and other methods will replace human workers in fast food restaurants. Just look at banks. Have ATM’s reduced the need for human tellers? Absolutely. But have ATM’s come close to eliminating the need for human tellers? Absolutely not.

  • What makes job seekers highly effective: Part 2

    July 06, 2016 by

    When job seekers find immediate success, what are they doing right? How are they standing out from the rest of the applicants who earn interviews?

    Those job seeker secrets to success were discussed in detail as part of the Successful Job Seekers Research portion of the 2016 Job Preparedness Indicator Study. The survey was conducted in March 2015 by the Career Advisory Board (CAB) established by DeVry University. As part of the research, over 500 job seekers were surveyed and the key findings and data from the research are highlighted in the accompanying video featuring Steven Rothberg, founder of College Recruiter, moderating a discussion with Alexandra Levit, a consultant, speaker, and workplace expert who has written six career advice books, and was formerly a nationally syndicated career columnist for the Wall Street Journal, and Madeleine Slutsky of DeVry University. The interview and discussion takes place from Google’s Chicago offices during the NACE 2016 Conference in June.

    Read the first article in this series: What makes a job seeker highly effective, Part 1 and learn more in the video below:

    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    What criteria qualifies one as a successful job seeker? According to the 2016 Job Preparedness Indicator Study, this includes:

    A. Active job seekers who secured a job offer within six months of their first interview.
    B. Passive candidates who already had a job, were recruited, and accepted an offer within 6 months of being recruited.

    “That’s pretty successful,” says Levit. “If you’re able to get a new job within six months, you’re doing something right.”

    According to the study, the first thing successful job seekers do is target their job search to a specific company.

    “The conventional wisdom is that if you just send your resume out to as many people as possible, it’s a number game; eventually something will hit,” says Levit. “In fact, this is the opposite of what we found to be true.”

    According to the survey data, 51 percent of active job seekers applied to five or fewer positions, and 66 percent applied to 10 or fewer jobs.

    “The majority of our successful job seekers are really going after specific companies they want to work at,” says Levit.

    They also know that they are qualified for those jobs, before submitting applications, says Levit. The research showed that 90 percent of job seekers wanted to be at least 75 percent qualified before applying to a targeted company and job, meaning they fit at least seven out of the 10 requirements of the job description before applying. In addition, 41 percent wanted to be at least 90 percent qualified before applying – meaning they fit nine out of the 10 requirements of the job description before applying.

    Successful job seekers also customize their resume and job search, and do significant research before putting together their cover letter, resume, and online profile for their target company. The survey results showed that 67 percent of successful job seekers reached out to the company contact person, and 32 percent reached out to their network to get inside info on the target company before applying. In addition, 84 percent tailored their resume to the exact specifics of the job they were targeting, updating it for each job. Translation: A targeted resume is much more effective than a one-size-fits-all resume.

    “This is something the Career Advisory Board has been saying for years,” says Levit. “Yes, unfortunately, every resume has to be customized if you want to be taken seriously. That’s what successful job seekers are doing.”

    Hiring managers pick up a resume and are going to know, within 20 seconds, if the applicant is a good fit for the job, says Levit. That’s why it’s important to tailor/customize each resume for a specific job.

    The study also uncovered some surprising news for job seekers: Successful job seekers don’t necessarily consider job-seeking a full-time role.

    Levit said this: “I have to admit, this is counter to the advice I have always given, which has been ‘if you are in the job market and not currently employed, you should be treating your job search like a full-time job,’ meaning you are spending seven or eight hours a day on (the job search). That’s not what successful job seekers are doing.”

    The study showed that 47 percent of successful job seekers conducted job search activities a total of one to three hours a day and 45 percent spent less than an hour per day on the job search. This includes writing resumes, networking, searching for jobs, and researching companies, among other job search duties.

    “Whatever they are doing is effective and efficient,” says Levitt. “It’s not quantity, it’s quality.”

    The bottom line? Successful job seekers put together job searches that target a specific company and job, and write resumes and cover letters tailored to that specific job. They work to connect with people inside the organization for which they are applying, and doing all of this is helping them land jobs faster than those who are not conducting a specific, targeted job search.

    Watch the video to learn more about what makes a job seeker highly effective.

    For more advice for job seekers, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

  • What makes a job seeker highly effective: Part 1

    June 29, 2016 by

    The 2016 Job Preparedness Indicator Study surveyed 500 U.S.-based hiring managers and measured gaps between what hiring managers are looking for and what candidates are bringing to the table. In addition, the study focused on job seeker success factors, and highlighted key elements of a successful job search.

    The survey was conducted in March 2015 by the Career Advisory Board (CAB) established by DeVry University. Key findings from the study, related to issues facing hiring managers, are analyzed in the article below, and the accompanying video features Steven Rothberg, founder of College Recruiter, moderating a discussion about the findings with CAB co-chairs Madeleine Slutsky of DeVry University and Alexandra Levit, a consultant, speaker, and workplace expert who has written six career advice books, and was formerly a nationally syndicated career columnist for the Wall Street Journal.

    This is the first in a two-part series analyzing the study and panel discussion with Rothberg, Slutsky, and Levit. The video was conducted from Google’s Chicago offices during NACE 2016 in June:

    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    Two intriguing factors emerged from the 2016 Job Preparedness Indicator Study, which is now in its sixth year:

    1. Hiring managers focus on 23 key soft skills: Hiring managers are focusing on a list of 23 key skills they believe today’s job seeker should have. Those 23 skills are:

      • Integrity
      • Work ethic
      • Time management
      • Written communication
      • Problem solving
      • Adaptability
      • Technology skills
      • Ability to work in a matrixed environment
      • Strategic perspective
      • Networking skills
      • Business acumen
      • Global competence
      • Accountability
      • Self-motivation
      • Verbal communication
      • Interpersonal skills
      • Assimilation of new information
      • Decision making
      • Analytical skills
      • Innovation
      • Presentation skills
      • Real-world work experience
      • Risk taking

    2. Hiring managers are unrealistic: Today’s hiring managers are unrealistic, according to the study. They expect job seekers to not only bring all 23 key skills to the table, but also require candidates to have the right education, related experience, and be a perfect interviewer, among other requirements.

    These requirements are affecting hiring decisions and that should concern hiring managers, says Levit.

    “When we look at the list of 23 skills that (hiring managers) said were important, they expect candidates to come through the door having a check box next to every single one of those skills,” says Levit. “You also have to be from the perfect industry, you have to be from the perfect background, you have to have graduated from a top university, and you have to be the perfect interviewer.”

    Levit continued: “Essentially they want somebody who has the complete and total package and aren’t really willing to say ‘maybe this person is strong in x, but we will have to train them on y.’”

    These stringent hiring requirements were okay a few years ago, says Levit, because there were more job seekers in the market than what company’s knew what to do with. But the playing field has changed, and hiring managers need to be more open.

    “As it becomes more of a job seekers market, with the recession well behind us, this is going to be a problem because you are going to see positions that are going to be left empty for many months, and that the people who are still doing the jobs of two or three individuals will start to burn out, and then they will leave, then you will need to fill more positions.”

    One positive note for hiring managers emerged from the study: Today’s college graduates are entering the workforce better prepared than they have in the past two, five or ten years. Translation: Today’s entry-level job seeker is advanced in all facets of the process.

    “I see the needle moving here,” says Levit. “Universities are preparing college students a little bit better for the work world and they are coming out with some of these (23 key) skills already.”

    However, even though college grads are better prepared, hiring managers and employers may overlook these, well-trained, rising stars because of strict hiring requirements. The trend isn’t about to change soon, either.

    “We don’t see this trend really going anywhere, which makes me concerned for hiring managers, because generally they are pretty unrealistic,” says Levit.

    For more advice for employers and hiring managers, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

  • How to select a career mentor

    May 10, 2016 by

    When you graduate from college, you lose daily, immediate access to some of your greatest mentors and teachers—faculty members, advisors, and career services professionals who have guided you through some of the best and most formative years of your life. When starting your first entry-level, full-time job, it’s important to begin seeking out a career mentor.

    This five-minute video, created by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, will help you select a quality career mentor.

    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    There are at least two types of mentors you need to find, ideally, when you begin your first full-time, entry-level job. The first type of mentor you need to find is a workplace mentor. This mentor works for the same company or organization but has at least a few years of experience under her belt. She probably works for the same team or within the same division and can provide you with guidance related to company policies and procedures, the ins and outs about how to make coffee in the breakroom, and other important tips about surviving on a daily basis within your organization.

    This video and article will help you select the other—and more important—type of mentor: a career mentor. A career mentor is a lifelong mentor; your career mentor has years of experience, preferably decades of experience, and works in your “dream career field.” A career mentor will provide career guidance and mentorship over the course of your career journey. When selecting a career mentor, be picky. You should spend at least a few months observing professionals and contemplating “fit” before asking someone to serve as your career mentor.

    Here are a few tips to aid you in selecting your career mentor.

    1. Look for elevator people.

    Elevator people are defined as people who bring you up, while basement people bring you down. This trait is especially important in mentors. When you’re asking someone for advice and guidance, you don’t want to leave every conversation feeling controlled, manipulated, deflated, or picked apart. Not only does that type of relationship sound very unhealthy, but it’s also completely unproductive. Seek out a career mentor who lifts others up. Is the mentor you’re considering territorial with her ideas? Does she appear jealous when you discuss something you’re working on that’s exciting to you? Move on and consider option B.

    2. Go for the “gel.”

    Can you completely relax when talking to your career mentor? This doesn’t mean you need to think of your career mentor as a peer; she’s not. You should have a great amount of respect for your career mentor.  Competent communication is defined as communication that is both effective and appropriate. Of course you want to interact with your mentor with an appropriate level of respect; you won’t talk to your mentor about the party you hosted Saturday night or your conflict with your boyfriend. You discuss those matters with your personal friends.

    But it is crucial to select a career mentor you “gel” with. Can you be honest about your career goals, or do you feel intimidated to discuss the future? Are you afraid your career mentor will laugh at your dreams? When you make mistakes at work (and don’t worry—every new entry-level employee makes mistakes), do you feel comfortable confessing those mistakes to your career mentor and seeking advice about how to overcome them? If not, you probably need to consider seeking out a new career mentor.

    3. Find a great listener.

    Motivational speakers may seem inspiring when you meet them, but remember when seeking a career mentor, you must find someone who can listen as much as she talks. You’re going to come up against obstacles over the course of your career journey, and it’s important that your career mentor listen well (without placing judgment). Only excellent listeners can offer excellent feedback and suggestions. Great career mentoring relationships tend to look alike—be sure yours matches up.

    4. Reflect on your feelings.

    Always reflect on your feelings after spending time with potential career mentors. Weigh pros and cons, make lists, and attempt to make a clear-headed decision before selecting a career mentor, certainly. But at the end of the day, relationships like this must be based at least partly on gut instinct. After going to lunch with your career mentor, do you feel better or worse? When you have a phone conversation, do you feel more positive or disheartened? Do you feel more motivated to go back to work and to try to reach your goals, or do you feel like taking the day off after talking to your mentor?

    5. Don’t discount your feelings before you make the final decision about asking someone to serve as your mentor.

    Lastly, when you decide to ask someone to serve as your career mentor, be gracious and grateful. Your career mentor is doing you a huge favor and will likely invest hours—if not days—of her life in yours. Mine has.

    For more advice about starting your first full-time job off right, read our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

  • TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo: Doing better deals

    April 22, 2016 by

    The Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions (TATech) will host a fall conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, on September 19-21, 2016. Peter Weddle, CEO of TATech, is excited to announce the conference and share information about the conference’s scope, purpose, and agenda with viewers in this video hosted by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager of College Recruiter. Bethany interviews Peter and Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, who will present a session for talent acquisition leaders at the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo.

    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    Peter Weddle explains that TATech is the global trade association for the talent acquisition solutions industry. It represents the for-profit enterprises and not-for-profit organizations that provide technology-based products and services for talent acquisition professionals, from applicant tracking system companies, job boards, and social media sites to mobile apps, recruitment advertising agencies, and cloud-based recruitment marketing platforms. Collectively, its members power or operate over 60,000 sites worldwide and provide state-of-the-art solutions services for virtually every facet of talent acquisition.

    The purpose of the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo is to provide cross-talk and information sharing between recruiters/talent acquisition professionals and vendors who provide products and services for talent acquisition professionals. Peter Weddle believes there is a lack of communication and interaction between these two groups of professionals, and that enabling employers and recruiters to get the information they need from their vendors will help them improve their return on investment.

    Steven Rothberg, President of College Recruiter, hopes to help talent acquisition leaders improve their return on investment when working with vendors, too, and that is the scope of his presentation entitled, “Doing better deals: How to be a smart consumer of talent acquisition solutions.” In the past, many employers simply posted jobs and assumed the risk; either the jobs would perform well or not. However, with the solutions available to employers now via technology, employers should do their homework and understand the estimated return on investment associated with various types of advertising (banner advertising, email campaigns, pay per click, etc.).

    Steven will cover this information in his presentation and believes it will empower talent acquisition professionals to make informed decisions regarding their college recruiting budgets. It will also help employers to negotiate better deals and to make cost comparisons between proposals from different vendors. He emphasizes that employers should negotiate with vendors and provide justification using metrics and pricing information using this type of cost comparison information.

    Peter Weddle emphasizes the value of attending a conference like the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo; there isn’t always an opportunity to visit face-to-face with owners of organizations like College Recruiter. In addition, TATech is offering free hotel accommodations at The Palms to those who register for the conference by June 15, 2016. Lastly, Peter mentions that the conference is truly a fun experience, featuring the 2016 Recruiting Service Innovation Awards (the ReSIs). Modeled after the Oscars, the awards are a red carpet, black tie optional celebration.

    Be sure to follow our blog for more information about upcoming conferences and events for recruiters and talent acquisition professionals. Subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.