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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted May 01, 2018 by

Aptitude and attitude isn’t enough: Interview with Randy Pennington about hiring for altitude

 

Randy Pennington, owner of Pennington Performance Group, has been talking recently about the need to hire for “altitude,” in addition to aptitude and attitude. We interviewed him to find out more. Pennington is an expert in helping organizations build cultures focused on positive results in a world of uncertainty, relationships, and accountability. He will be a speaker at SHRM 2018, presenting a mega session titled “The Six Competencies You Need to Remain Relevant in a World of Disruption and Change.” Here we share takeaways from our conversation about recruiting and developing employees, including entry-level, to increase your organization’s altitude.

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Posted July 11, 2016 by

Networking benefits entry-level candidates

Handshake between a man and a woman photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

In their search for entry-level jobs, college students and recent graduates should not assume all employment opportunities are made public. Sometimes, there are opportunities available they can’t find in the newspaper or even online. Students and graduates should talk to people (including their families and friends) about the type of jobs they are looking for. This is part of professional networking. Networking is an opportunity for job seekers to engage in meaningful conversation advancing their careers.

While much of this conversation today happens online, meeting recruiters, hiring managers, or other professionals in person should not be forgotten. Speaking with recruiters, talent acquisition leaders, and hiring managers face-to-face can benefit college students and recent graduates when searching for entry-level jobs. By introducing themselves in person, students and grads can learn more about potential employers, which can help them stand out from the competition. Karen A. Young, President and Founder of HR Resolutions, LLC, shares advice on networking concerning entry-level candidates.

· “If students want to set themselves apart, I want to meet them in person! I can, probably, already find them online.

· This generation already has a bad reputation for being too “connected.” Get out and see and talk to people.

· The workplace is about face-to-face connections (even in a virtual workspace), so demonstrate you can present yourself in that environment.”

Need more networking advice? Click on our blog, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Karen Young, President and Founder of HR Resolutions, LLC

Karen Young, President and Founder of HR Resolutions, LLC

Karen Young is the award-winning Founder and President of HR Resolutions, a full-service human resources management company. She has over 25 years of experience in personnel and human resources, as well as being recognized by the HR Certification Institute as a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) and the Society for Human Resource Management as an SHRM-SCP. Karen has worked with numerous organizations to improve workplace environments, lower HR costs, and increase the bottom line.

Posted May 03, 2016 by

5 onboarding tips for recent grads

So you just landed your first entry-level job and are graduating from college soon. Congratulations! You’re completing two major milestones simultaneously. After you celebrate, settle in, watch this short video hosted by Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, and read this brief article before showing up for your first day of work.

What is “onboarding?” Why should you care about it? And how should you prepare for it?

According to The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), onboarding is “the process by which new hires get adjusted to the social and performance aspects of their jobs quickly and smoothly, and learn the attitudes, knowledge, skills, and behaviors required to function effectively within an organization.” Thankfully, most companies no longer have a sink-or-swim mentality regarding new employees. They have recognized the costs associated with recruiting, hiring, and training new employees, and they want to retain top candidates. In order to do so, they attempt to help new hires transition into the workplace as quickly and as smoothly as possible.

That’s the good news for you as a new employee.

That doesn’t mean you don’t have a part to play in the onboarding process, though. Here are five quick tips to ease the transition from recent grad to entry-level employee.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Onboarding is a two-way street.

When you’re a new entry-level employee, you’ll have a reasonable amount of jitters on your first day of work (and beyond). You’ll feel concerned about what to wear, who to talk to, and how to behave during meetings. This is totally normal.

But if it eases your mind, just remember that onboarding—the process of acclimation—is a two-way street. Your employer is just as concerned about making a great first impression on YOU as you are about making a great first impression on her. Does your new employer treat you well on your first day? Did your new coworkers greet you or ignore you? Did your supervisor have materials and office supplies waiting for you, or did you have to wait for three days for a computer to be set up? These might seem like minor details, but they’re really not. Pay attention to the way you’re treated.

There are many common onboarding mistakes employers make that reflect negatively on the employer and affect their ability to retain great employees (like you!). The way your employer (not just your supervisor, but everyone in the company) treats you speaks volumes about the corporate culture and work environment. This helps you make your decision about whether this company is a good long-term fit for you as an employee.

2. Don’t glaze over during orientation.

Even though orientation at many companies can seem a little dry (okay, ahem, boring), the information covered can actually be important. While the information covered may not be presented in the most entertaining manner, it’s probably information you need to either perform your job well or to function well in the workplace. Either way, attempt to pay attention rather than zone out by playing with apps on your phone. Not only will you appear to be a more engaged employee to your new employer, but you’ll also retain more of the content covered (which might come in handy later when you’re expected to remember it).

3. Stick around during breaks/lunch.

It’s easy to give into the temptation to skip out during breaks or during lunch and dinner invitations, which are totally optional, but that’s when you have the opportunity to truly network with your coworkers and supervisors. Not only will you build genuine working relationships with others, but you’ll also learn more about company culture by attending these “off the record” events. You’ll see people’s true colors and be more likely to enjoy the next day’s “on the record” events if you connect well with your coworkers over dinner the night before.

4. Ask questions.

If you’re sitting through a training session or orientation workshop and feel confused or have a question, speak up! Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Many new hires often feel too intimidated to ask questions and wind up struggling in the workplace for weeks, or even months, as a result.

If you’re too intimidated to speak up during a large meeting, take notes and ask your supervisor questions later.

5. Get a mentor (or two).

Many companies now provide new employees, particularly recent college graduates, with official mentors. However, you may want to consider seeking out your own mentors. It’s never a bad idea to find one mentor in your company (someone with at least a few years of experience) and another mentor in your “dream” career field. This person might wind up being your career mentor for life, so select someone you truly admire and whose career path you may want to emulate. A career mentor can provide guidance from time to time and advice when times are tough in your career journey. It helps to hear an objective voice and encouraging word from someone you admire.

You’ve already done the tough part of landing a great entry-level job; just continue preparing yourself for those first few months of work as you transition into a brand new employee. You’re going to do a fabulous job.

For more onboarding tips, read our blog and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

Posted April 13, 2016 by

College Recruiter sponsoring premiere event in Europe for university relations leaders

Brussels, BelgiumCollege Recruiter has two primary types of users: candidates who are searching for great careers and the employers who recruit them. One way that we give back to the recruiting community is by regularly sharing our knowledge and trying our best to advance the conversations through our blog, videos, and social media. Another way is through conferences such as the dozen or so College Recruiting Bootcamp events we’ve organized to-date.

A third way that give back to the recruiting community is through our active participation in conferences organized by partners. This weekend, for example, chief executive officer Faith Rothberg will moderate a panel at TAtech (the Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions) in Orlando about how job boards can and should prevent fraud including bogus jobs which are posted for a number of reasons, one of which is identity theft. On Monday, I’ll deliver a presentation at SHRM Talent Management in Orlando about how talent acquisition leaders can use metrics to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their departments but also to get that “seat at the table” that so many crave but haven’t been able to attain because the information they share with their C-level leaders has been tactical and not strategic. About a week later I’ll be in D.C. for TalentBlend 2016. College Recruiter is a sponsor and I’m moderating a panel discussion with Alton Fox of Lockheed Martin and Temeka Thompson of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission during which we’ll talk about how leading organizations recruit students and recent graduates through off-campus channels including interactive recruitment media such as College Recruiter.

Pretty much all of the above has a U.S. focus but we’re well aware that there’s a big, beautiful world outside of our borders. Indeed, most of our Fortune 1,000 and even federal government clients have hiring needs around the world and we’re increasingly being called upon to help them with those needs. Today, for example, we’re working on a proposal for a federal government agency that has significant hiring needs for people who are U.S. citizens, live or are willing to live abroad, have college degrees, and speak both English and Spanish. These multinational projects are challenging yet a lot of fun and have led us to engage with organizations in other countries whose missions include helping students and recent graduates find great careers. An example is Gradcore, a U.K.-based organization run by my friend, Martin Edmondson. I delivered the keynote presentation at their annual conference a couple of years ago and in May we are sponsoring and helping to organize their GEC Europe conference.  (more…)

Posted April 17, 2014 by

Average Starting Salary for College Grads is $45,327

Petroleum Engineer

Petroleum Engineer photo courtesy of Shutterstock

It isn’t uncommon for many of our employer clients to grossly underestimate the going rate for recent graduates. Almost every employer wants to pay their employees fairly but few have the time or resources to accurately determine just what is fair.

Example? Last week an employer posted a job to our site for people who graduated within the past three years and who are interested in an entry-level sales position. That was fine except the compensation they were willing to pay was $30,000 per year. That’s $15,327 less than the average starting salary for a 2013 college graduate of $45,327. As you may have guessed, the response to their posting was less than overwhelming. We tried to explain the problem to the employer but the reaction was typical: a recent grad should be grateful for any employment opportunity and so the pay rate shouldn’t matter. Well, it does matter. (more…)

Posted May 20, 2013 by

Finding the Elusive Work-Life Balance

The words Work and Life on a seesaw

The words Work and Life on a seesaw. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Whether it applies to their diets, checkbooks or personalities, it seems people are always trying to achieve balance. However, in recent years working professionals may be placing an increased emphasis on establishing a work-life balance – effectively juggling career, family and personal responsibilities in order to reduce stress and increase job satisfaction. (more…)

Posted November 26, 2012 by

Lessons Learned by Employers Impacted by Hurricane Sandy

Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

By Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

Four weeks after Sandy, life is getting back to normal – or is it? Walking the dog around a relatively unscathed block of homes in central NJ (miles from the shore), reminders are everywhere. Tons of debris in front of every home (more than 40 homes); the noise of still more 75-foot oak trees being cut while leaning precariously over homes rends the air; blue tarps draped over roofs (5 homes) that were speared with limbs weighing tons; and a flatbed truck finally easing up behind a flattened neighbor’s car (where my 75 foot oak fell). I check to make sure he doesn’t accidentally take the new car next to it.

Sandy was a storm that has little comparison even to Katrina although we can take some comfort that lessons learned from that catastrophic event seven years ago were likely responsible for preparations last month that saved lives – response speed and pre-positioning among them. (more…)

Posted October 18, 2012 by

With Unemployment High for Returning Vets, Nine Tips for Acing the Job Interview

Jim Camp

Jim Camp, Vietnam vet, and President and CEO of The Camp Negotiation Institute

There’s bad news and good news for post 9/11 returning veterans, known as the Gulf War Era II vets. The government’s October 2012 employment figures show that the unemployment rate for Gulf War Era II vets is 9.7%; but for the youngest vets, age 20-24, it’s a whopping 14.5% (compared to 12.1% for nonveterans), and for vets age 25-29, it’s 11.5% (compared to 8.7% for nonveterans).

In a 2012 Society for Human Resource Management poll of 359 HR professionals, 50% of the respondents said that one of the biggest challenges in hiring veterans is “translating military skills to civilian job experience.” (more…)

Posted October 10, 2012 by

Despite GOP and Fox News Claims to Contrary, 7.8% Unemployment is Real

China GormanFirst it was Fox News. Then it was former CEO of General Electric Jack Welch. Then it was former and current windbag Donald Trump. I was disappointed but hardly surprised when those conspiracy theorists and die hard Republican supporters accused the Obama Administration and Bureau of Labor Statistics of falsifying last Friday’s employment reports. Sometimes the truth hurts, even when the truth is that almost 900,000 more Americans are working now than a month ago and that fact should be celebrated. But I was surprised to see someone that I have a lot of respect for — former Chief Operating Officer of the Society for Human Resource Management China Gorman — join the naysayers. Say it ain’t so, China. Say it ain’t so.

Without producing a shred of any evidence — even questionable evidence — to the contrary, conspiracy theorists and GOP supporters across the conservative media outlets have slandered the ethics of the non-political appointee economists who compile and publish the monthly jobs reports for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. These conspiracy theorists were apparently disappointed to learn that almost 900,000 more Americans are working today than a month ago and that more Americans are now working than were when President Obama took office. That disappointment — thinly veiled by many of them — is sickening. That almost 900,000 more Americans are working than a month ago and more Americans are working than when Obama took office undercuts their argument that only Governor Mitt Romney and Congressman Paul Ryan can right the economy and the job market and that they will do so through the austerity measures which have devastated our state and local governments as well as the governments in Europe. (more…)

Posted February 29, 2012 by

More Employers Hiring Military Veterans, Yet Assistance Still Needed

The transition for military veterans back into civilian life is not easy.  This is also true for employers who want to hire them, but need a better understanding of what they have to offer.

A new poll from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) released this week shows that the majority of organizations—64 percent—have hired military veterans during the past 36 months, an increase over the 53 percent that reported the same in 2010.

Though more than six in 10 organizations have hired military veterans during the past three years, the number could hit 10 in 10 if only the civilian and military sectors widely understood the other’s job skills jargon. (more…)