ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 01, 2016 by

4 beautiful truths of networking

Networking is an essential skill we must all hone in life. It is a trait that takes practice and patience. Due to the variety of different personality types, networking does come more naturally to some rather than others. So with a few tips and practice, anyone can learn to network in a more effective manner. In this short video, college student Macie Brooke Edgewater shares four beautiful truths of networking to help anyone become a little more comfortable with networking.


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  1. In social networking, always be your authentic self. We all have certain traits that are uniquely us that can contribute to building a repertoire. If you have a tendency toward joking around people, use that natural skill to your advantage, and make them laugh. Let your new contact see the side of you that can adapt to the conversation. If you tend to have a more serious approach, exposing that side of your personality up front, will give your new relationship a solid foundation to build upon, as well.
  2. Kindness goes a long way. Be kind to everyone you meet. A smile, a nod, a simple hello can be a potentially fantastic start to a brand new relationship. Yes, some of us are a bit introverted, but getting out of your comfort zone and practicing these simple greetings will help you practice and it will also open up the door for more opportunities to socialize. Make the effort to be outgoing. It becomes easier over time.
  3. Make sure you listen to the conversation you’re participating in. People truly enjoy telling their story, so let them.
  4. When you find yourself at a loss for words, or shyness kicks in, ask one of four questions to get the conversation flowing again. Who, where, what, and why can start an entirely new conversation. Never get offended. If you find that you have made a new contact and they have not responded to your last effort to converse, do not take it personally. We are a very busy society, and we must remember that other people’s time is just as valuable as our own.

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Macie Brooke Edgewater is a psychology major at UACCB and is currently pursuing her degree in order to work as a high school counselor. She enjoys the outdoors, reading, writing, training dogs, and music of the metal persuasion. Concerts are a favorite pastime. She is well versed in many trades but especially enjoys interviewing bands.

Posted June 03, 2016 by

Onboarding benefits interns and new hires

Training photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Employers can take different approaches when it comes to their onboarding programs. Some companies focus more on management, while others concentrate on the social aspect. These approaches and others shape new employees into the company culture. Beverly Behrmann, Academic and Career Advisor at Keene State College, discusses how certain companies help college students and new hires succeed in the onboarding process.

“As for onboarding programs, bigger national companies like Liberty Mutual have extensive management programs that work closely with new hires to ensure success. There is a mentoring component and a rotation so new hires can see various aspects of the company and how divisions work.

Here in Keene, there are two local employers we work with often. They are Barton Associates and Electronic Imaging Materials. Both companies build in a social component to integrate new employees. This might include potluck lunches, games, and “fun” gatherings. Both companies also have extensive internship opportunities so college students can get acclimated to workplace scenarios and behaviors in a lower risk situation. If the internship works out, students may transition into full-time employees and have been “socialized” to a certain extent by the time they start as full-time employees.”

Looking for ways to build an onboarding program? Head to our advertising solutions page and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Beverly Behrmann, Academic and Career Advisor at Keene State College

Beverly Behrmann, Academic and Career Advisor at Keene State College

The Office of Academic and Career Advising believes in empowering students to develop lifelong skills that will serve them beyond their time at Keene State College. This philosophy is paramount in creating successful and meaningful outcomes and one Beverly Behrmann wholeheartedly shares. As career advisor, Beverly helps students gain essential skills needed to pursue their academic and career paths. By working with students through individual appointments and class presentations, she provides resources to help them navigate the career development process.

Posted May 28, 2016 by

Core advantages of vocational and technical education programs

Engineering photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

There are many purposes served by vocational and technical colleges. These colleges create many opportunities for students to further their professional careers and to earn more money. They also offer many career programs in practical fields that don’t require academic training in traditional four-year programs.

This article will present some core advantages of vocational and technical courses offered by colleges to high school students.

Shortening freshman year

For high school students, the most prominent and motivating factor of enrolling into vocational programs is that they enable students to shorten their freshman year in college. Since the college years are in a traditional four-year degree program, quarters and semesters usually involve credits earned. Students can considerably shorten their freshman year and earn enough college credits during high school. This might add up enough to cut freshman year in half for some.

Winning college credits

It is a fact that high schools do not offer this option. However, there are many vocational and technical colleges that provide entry-level classes to students studying in high schools who have established a good capacity and ability for college education. Usually, this is ascertained through a counselor or mentor who guides students, even though there are some schools that allow high school students to enroll for classes.

Since college level classes are taken by high school students, they are given the chance by vocational and technical programs to start their college education. Usually, students can attend classes at night, after the end of their regular high school duration. The credits won by these programs can be put toward first-year generals at a conventional education center.

Getting used to college years

The environment of a vocational and technical college program is one between high school and college. This approach makes an undeniably perfect learning environment for high school students to become familiar with a different learning experience.

Typically, students want the stress-free and informal learning environment, and they can experience it by enrolling into a vocational program. It is a common fact that high school is usually infamous for being filled with ‘cliques,’ but the college life is more relaxed, as it involves more social aspect and social interaction.

Creating a perfect college application

The college application process for admission is another one of the motivating factors for taking a vocational and technical program during high school. Students want admissions to highly desirable and top-ranking universities, but getting in a college or university is fierce competition. Thus, students will have to do everything to make their college applications the best.

Specialty career programs

The subject matter in specialty courses is one more reason to consider vocational programs during high school. If we talk about the United Kingdom, there are many high schools dropping numerous elective programs and the budget cuts are the main reason behind it. There are many cases in which the first subjects and programs to be dropped are physical activities like shop, band, and physical education.

For students with interests in any of these programs, their only option available is taking them at a vocational college. They can find an extensive array of these vocational programs at most vocational and technical colleges. Plus, the bonus is students will get in-depth and hands on vocational classes they can’t find in high school.

Considering educational opportunities for your future? Visit the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

John Kelly is a professional and proactive article writer, as well as an education counselor. He also provides UK writing help to customers for enhancing their skills and knowledge. He also writes articles for the benefit of students.

Posted February 05, 2016 by

Addressing low grades during interviews

Photo of Joe Flanagan

Joe Flanagan, guest writer

According to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, or OECD, there’s a crisis in the USA with only 46% of students finishing college. Whether you have dropped out or graduated with low grades you are not alone. Interviews can be a nerve-wracking experience, particularly your very first one, but if you are leaving college with low grades, the prospect of interviews can seem even more daunting. It is important to remember that despite low grades, you have still been invited for an interview, so the employer is interested in you. If you are worried about explaining your low grades, these tips can help you deal with this without it becoming a major issue. (more…)

Posted May 01, 2015 by

Telltale Signs You Need a Break From Work

Office worker takes a break from his work and leans back daydreaming

Office worker takes a break from his work and leans back daydreaming. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Stress among adults is often linked to work. The problem is they don’t know when they are already stressed.

Juliet Schor, writer of the best selling book The Overworked American, tells that people are literally working themselves to death. They get 90 minutes less sleep than they should, resulting to chronic diseases like hypertension, diabetes and depression.

Overworking can cause serious problems but modern employees have become workaholics. Dean Schabner of ABC news reports that people work longer days, get less vacation time, and feel pressured with competition resulting to so much stress.

So how can you tell if you are too stressed from work? Here are some signs you need to observe: (more…)

Posted March 18, 2015 by

What Employers Notice About Job Seekers on Social Media

Are you on social media?  If the answer is yes, you know how convenient a tool it is for expressing yourself to anyone.  However, if you are a job seeker, you must be extra careful about your form of expression.  Remember, your family and friends are not the only ones watching you on social media.  These days, employers and recruiters are also paying attention to what you post, and their first impression of you can make or break your chances of employment.  So, what do employers notice on these social networking websites?  Let’s find out. (more…)

Posted February 03, 2015 by

The Top 4 Things to Ask on your College Tour

Group of people taking tour of university

Group of people taking tour of university. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

It’s very important for students to ask the right questions when going on their college tours. Many students feel shy or embarrassed to ask too many questions, however, this is not the time to keep quiet. Choosing where to attend college is one of the most important decisions in a young person’s life and it’s crucial that they ask the questions that are most important to them. (more…)

Posted January 09, 2015 by

Six Simple Tips to Fit Study around Your Busy Work Life

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

When you are pursuing a degree or diploma, it can sometimes be difficult to find time for all the studying you need to do. Work, family, and your social life can sometimes get in the way of studying for your classes. If you are wondering how to fit in study around your busy work life, follow these six simple tips. (more…)

Posted November 25, 2014 by

Are You Changing Jobs Constantly? How to Improve Your Chances of Finding a New Position

If you are someone who has changed jobs multiple times, then you have probably heard that doing so makes potential employers skeptical about hiring you for employment.  While that is a fair point from an employer’s prospective, it does not mean that a job seeker can’t get another position.  In fairness, you may have had personal and/or professional reasons for leaving one job and searching for another one.  Now, though, because you have been a job hopper, you must prove to a potential employer that you are the best candidate for a job opening.  Here are some things to keep in mind for your job search. (more…)

Posted October 02, 2014 by

Searching for an Entry Level Job or Internship Using Social Media? How to Approach It

It is no secret that social media is a huge part of modern day communication.  While many people use it for personal reasons, some also use it for their job searches.  If you’re looking for an entry level job or an internship, social media can help you learn more about job opportunities and companies that you are interested in working for.  However, job seekers must be careful how they present themselves online to be taken seriously by potential employers.  Let’s take a look at some ways to approach your search for career opportunities. (more…)