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Posted April 02, 2016 by

How to avoid 5 common study slip-ups

Female college student studying in a library courtesy of Shutterstock.com

michaeljung/Shutterstock.com

Highly effective students know how to study. They pace themselves and don’t save all of their studying for the last minute. They also know how to take notes along the way to make their studying more efficient. Cramming and other last-minute study techniques can leave them exhausted, and incapable of performing well on test day. Use these ideas to improve your study system, and get a better grade this time around.

1. Avoid cramming

If you absolutely have to cram before a test, try to take breaks. Sleep is important for learning, so find a few hours to sleep after a long study session, and you’ll be better able to think clearly during the test. Research shows the first sleep cycle lasts about three hours. After that, we dip in and out every one and a half hours. Try to sleep from three to four and a half hours before your test.

2. Create a habit

Studying at the same time every day allows students to study better for their tests and make time for important assignments. Pick a time when you are unlikely to be disturbed and aim for the same time each day. You’ll get a better study session, and your brain will start to become used to your study routine.

3. Study locations

The place where students study is important. If they find they study best in the library, they should make a habit of getting out of their dorms or apartments, and getting to the library first thing. Make home a safe place from school work, and find places outside of it to work hard and for preparation. This way, home can become a place to relax, unwind, and have some fun.

4. Set specific goals

If you’re working toward a master’s in higher education, your goals should be specific and relate not only to your coursework, but your future career. Create lesson plans to start building the skills to become a teacher. Conduct mock lectures when teaching the material you’re learning in school to an imaginary classroom. This will not only show what you haven’t learned, but will prepare you to become a more effective educator. The same goes if you plan to intern as a scientist in the lab or research assistant. Come up with appropriate scenarios and hands-on study that prepare you for your future career and still help you learn the material.

5. Don’t procrastinate

Treat studying like a job. The most important thing to remember is students don’t have to be in the mood for studying. Studying is a process, and they may have some good days and some bad days. It’s okay to have a bad study session. Don’t let your mood affect whether you’re going to study. Push through and make your habits stick, and the rest is easy.

If you’re going for a long study session, start with the most difficult subjects first. Move on to the easier subjects when fatigue becomes a factor. Remember to take frequent breaks, and eat foods high in protein and carbs to sustain your energy levels and to prevent dips in energy.

If you’re looking for more study tips, go to the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Brooke Chaplan

Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

Posted April 06, 2015 by

Control Interview Nerves to Be at Your Best

Okay, so you have landed the job or internship interview you’ve been waiting for.  Congratulations!  Now, though, as the big day approaches, you are getting nervous.  Being nervous is not necessarily a bad thing; it is human nature and just means you understand the importance of the impression you make and do not want to take the interview for granted.  The key is understanding how to control your nerves.  Here is some information to help you feel better. (more…)

Posted October 01, 2014 by

11 Tips for Rejoining the Workforce After a Career Break

Heather Dugan

Heather Dugan, Salary.com contributing writer

First of all, congratulations on the new job! Whether you were unemployed and searching for something new, or you took time off to raise kids or take care of loved ones, welcome back to the workforce.

But at the same time, it’s understandable that you’re a little leery about transitioning back to the working world after a prolonged absence. Will people like me? What have I missed? Is the technology different? Can I really meet these new challenges in unfamiliar territory?

Before you start your new chapter, take a minute to read about a few tips for getting back in the flow without breaking stride. (more…)

Posted September 11, 2014 by

Grads, Interviewing for Your Dream Entry Level Jobs? 11 Tips to Prepare You

College graduates hoping to land the entry level jobs of their dreams should make sure they are prepared for their interviews.  The following post has 11 interview tips that can help.

Few aspects of adult life are more distressing than the job interview. Something about having to offer up your entire life experience to a stranger for validation makes us feel uneasy. Luckily, you can take certain steps to ensure you present your best self, no matter what position you’re applying for. (Click

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Posted September 04, 2014 by

Working Entry Level Jobs that are Nocturnal? 6 Tips to Help You Make it Through

Young professionals and others who work entry level jobs at night can get six tips on how to survive them in the following post.

You don’t need a science degree to figure out that people need sleep. But countless research points to the same conclusion: insufficient sleep can cause a wide range of physical and mental health problems, from poor judgment to depression to heart disease. And ideally, humans should get the sleep they need at night and stay

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Posted September 03, 2014 by

Four Signs that a Student is Overcommitted to Extracurricular Activities

Ryan Hickey

Ryan Hickey, Managing Editor of Peterson’s & EssayEdge

Participating in extracurricular activities is an integral part of the education process. By joining clubs and organizations, students gain the “soft skills” that are increasingly important to excelling in today’s workforce: leadership, teamwork, and negotiation skills. However, the commitment can be significant and sometimes it is too much. How can you tell if you, a friend or your child has overcommitted themselves to extracurricular activities? Look for these signs to avoid total burnout. (more…)

Posted August 28, 2014 by

Should students work while studying?

Job or education directions on a metal signpost

Job or education directions on a metal signpost. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Should a student get a job and work whilst studying? Here are a few arguments for and a few against. The issue isn’t really a cut and dry, black and white one. For example, a student taking programming courses should certainly get a job if he or she can manage his or her schedule so that no sleep is lost (it is difficult to program when tired). On the other hand, a student taking a medical or veterinary course should definitely not get a job because there is scarcely enough time to get the studying done and fit in some sleep. (more…)

Posted June 27, 2014 by

Caffeine side effects: Does caffeine affect test scores?

 

The average person consumes caffeine on a daily basis. We wake up, we brew our cup of Joe and use the caffeine to propel us throughout our day. But for students, what caffeine side effects matter? Surprisingly, studies have shown that coffee consumption in college students may have an effect on test scores.

The Nutrition Journal in 2007 published a study in which 51% of 496 college students who regularly consumed coffee to help them with test preparation. Some Psychopharmacologists have concluded that this inevitably gave the students an advantage. Additionally three studies published by John Wiley and Sons in Human Psychopharmacology “put caffeine as an advantage”. (more…)

Posted February 24, 2014 by

College Grads, Haven’t Found Those Entry Level Jobs Yet? 5 Ways to Use Your Time Wisely

College graduates who have not found entry level jobs to this point can do five things to use their time wisely.  Learn what they are in the following post.

Today’s post is about that awkward phase (no, not puberty) between graduation and the time when your job-in-shining-armor sweeps you off your feet! You all know how tempting it is to just be a bum and live off mom and dad forever, but yeah, not going to happen!

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Posted February 10, 2014 by

How to Stand Out at Your Entry-Level Job

Happy student/young woman giving a thumbs up on getting first business job

Happy student/young woman giving a thumbs up on getting first business job. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

As new college graduates find out very quickly, many entry-level jobs are not designed to help you stand out. Instead, your role is to fade into the background; to pour coffee, assist a higher-up, or otherwise serve in the day-to-day administrata of office work.

However, even if your job involves a lot of envelope-stuffing and printer management, there are still ways to stand out and start your journey to career success. (more…)