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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted May 16, 2018 by

The transformation to HR positive: Interview with HR trailblazers

 

What does it mean to be HR Positive? I spoke with two HR leaders who are blazing their way to a new perception of HR at their own organizations. Cecilia Clark, Senior HR Generalist at Schwan’s, supplements her HR career with a background in Finance, so she is an expert in connecting business and HR strategy to positively affect the bottom line. Chris Orozco, at Win-River Resort and Casino, turned Human Resources into Team Member Relations, which he currently leads. They are both official SHRM 2018 bloggers, and you can read more of their thoughts on Cici’s own HR blog, and Chris’ personal blog “Create: Life and Leadership by Design.” (more…)

Posted May 01, 2018 by

Aptitude and attitude isn’t enough: Interview with Randy Pennington about hiring for altitude

 

Randy Pennington, owner of Pennington Performance Group, has been talking recently about the need to hire for “altitude,” in addition to aptitude and attitude. We interviewed him to find out more. Pennington is an expert in helping organizations build cultures focused on positive results in a world of uncertainty, relationships, and accountability. He will be a speaker at SHRM 2018, presenting a mega session titled “The Six Competencies You Need to Remain Relevant in a World of Disruption and Change.” Here we share takeaways from our conversation about recruiting and developing employees, including entry-level, to increase your organization’s altitude.

(more…)

Posted April 18, 2018 by

Recruiting diverse entry-level talent: Interview with Kathryn Christie

 

To get another perspective on diversity recruitment, I interviewed Kathryn Christie, the Director of Talent at Self Management Group. She has a passion for uncovering how to develop and retain high-performing employees to drive individual and organizational excellence. At SHRM 2018 conference she will be presenting “Recruiting Diversity: Let’s Get Tangible.” Here we share her insight about recruiting diverse entry-level talent. (more…)

Posted April 11, 2018 by

Diversity and inclusion in university relations: From compliance to increased productivity

 

SHRM18 Blogger GraphicFor years, I’ve been hearing employers talk about the importance of hiring a diverse workforce. Probably my first encounter with a formalized approach to attain this goal was way back in 1989 when I worked for Honeywell as a student. Down the hall from my department was our Office of Affirmative Action. Typical for that era, the reason for the existence of the office was far more about compliance than furthering any other business objective.

Now let’s flash forward a couple of decades. Not only were the names of these offices changing to include words like diversity but so were the objectives. Some of the world’s largest and most respected employers of college and university students and recent graduates were diversifying their candidate pools. They weren’t doing it just for compliance. More importantly, they were seeing data showing that more diverse workforces were more productive workforces. (more…)

improving the candidate experience should be the goal of every employer, and every talent acquisition specialist. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted June 01, 2017 by

Why employers should focus on improving the candidate experience

Candidate experience, according to Jibe, is defined as “how job seekers perceive and react to employers’ sourcing, recruiting, interviewing, hiring, and onboarding processes.”

Why candidate experience matters

Improving the candidate experience should be at the top of every Talent Acquisition Director’s recruitment and retention strategy. It’s that important. Want more proof? Check out these statistics from Lever, which provides software that streamlines the hiring process and simplifies the Applicant Tracking System:

  1. 83% of talent say a negative interview experience can change their mind about a role or company they once liked, while 87% of talent say a positive interview experience can change their mind about a role or company they once doubted.
  2. 60% of job seekers have quit an application in the middle due to its length or complexity.
  3. 72% of hiring managers say they provide clear job descriptions, while only 36% of candidates say the same.
  4. 80% of job seekers say they would be discouraged to consider other relevant job openings at a company that failed to notify them of their application status. Yet, they would be 3.5 times more likely to re-apply to a company if they were notified.
  5. Talent is 4 times more likely to consider your company for a future opportunity when you offer them constructive feedback.

Employers looking to reduce attrition, hire high volume in cost-effective ways, and develop low-cost tactics to recruit diverse talent, need to pay close attention to improving the candidate experience.

“Candidate experience is everything,” says Sanjoe Jose, CEO at Talview, a digital interviewing, talent engagement, and hiring analytics software company. “The most important aspect of improving the candidate experience is recognizing that you’re not just dealing with candidates, you’re dealing with people. They want respect. Respect their time and efforts. Don’t make them take a day’s leave and travel for a first round interview, use tools. They want clarity on timelines and the process. Respond to their queries in near real-time, by using technology like chatbots.”

Candidate experience touch points

These scenarios all influence the candidate experience:

  • The experience a candidate has reading a job description and instructions given on the job description.
  • The simplicity – or difficulty – of using an applicant tracking system to apply for that job.
  • The introductory email or auto respond email that is generated after the application is submitted.
  • Follow-up communication, such as being called for a phone interview, or in-person interview. Or, a follow-up email notifying the candidate they weren’t selected to advance in the process.
  • The interview – how the candidate is greeted and treated in the interview.
  • Post-interview follow-up – is the candidate kept informed of timeline/when a decision will be made?
  • Presentation of an offer.

The candidate experience helps build an employer brand,” says Jose. “Even if people don’t want to work for you, a good candidate experience can lead to them becoming ‘brand ambassadors’ passing on the good news about your company to others that might be interested.”

And people are certainly going to share their candidate experiences online via social channels.

“Social media means that people talk more now than ever before,” says Jose. “It means that word of mouth is now global, rather than local.”

Improving the candidate experience

There are three main components to a candidate experience, says Jose, and understanding the role each component plays can help employers and talent acquisition specialists present a strong candidate experience:

  1. People: Including recruiters, hiring managers, and even the receptionist who is the first person the candidate meets if he/she comes into your office.
  2. Systems: All the tools candidates use during the process impact the candidate experience, including: The applicant tracking system used to apply for the job, tools used for video interviews, assessments and/or onboarding tools, are all a part of the many systems employers use that relate to the candidate experience.
  3. Process: The efficiency of the process, turnaround times, automated messaging, followup are all part of the candidate process.

Improving all of those is essential to improving the candidate experience.

Jose recently heard from the CEO of a large technology company who said one frustrated candidate wrote to the CEO expressing disappointment in the lack of follow-up after an interview. This is a prime example of a poor candidate experience. If it happens to one person, it’s likely happening to others.

That has both long and short-term effects.

“In the short-term, candidates will drop from the funnel,” says Jose. “In the long-term, a poor candidate experience leads to a poor ability to attract good candidates.”

And then the cycle continues, recruiting costs go up, attrition rises, positions go unfilled, and the company suffers.

“Every single candidate touch point—the online application experience, each interaction with the scheduler, the preparedness of the interviewers, the turnaround time in communicating with candidates, the way an offer is delivered—reflects on the employer,” said Elaine Orler, CEO and founder of talent acquisition consultancy Talent Function, in an SHRM article. “If you’re missing the mark, the world soon knows about it…and highly skilled people juggling competing offers will certainly factor their experience as a candidate into their final decision, so it impacts offer acceptance rates.”

That’s why improving the candidate experience should be the goal of every employer, and every talent acquisition specialist.

Want more advice and tips on how to improve the candidate experience? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted September 02, 2016 by

Analytics, data changing way employers recruit, hire college graduates

 

Workforce analytics are transforming human capital strategy, said Mark Schmit, Ph.D., SHRM-SCP, executive director of the SHRM Foundation. That’s why it’s more important than ever for employers to understand how analytics and data will drive recruiting and hiring decisions. Schmit’s comments were part of the Society of Human Resource Management’s release of the Use of Workforce Analytics for Competitive Advantage Report in June of 2016. (more…)

Posted May 03, 2016 by

5 onboarding tips for recent grads

So you just landed your first entry-level job and are graduating from college soon. Congratulations! You’re completing two major milestones simultaneously. After you celebrate, settle in, watch this short video hosted by Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, and read this brief article before showing up for your first day of work.

What is “onboarding?” Why should you care about it? And how should you prepare for it?

According to The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), onboarding is “the process by which new hires get adjusted to the social and performance aspects of their jobs quickly and smoothly, and learn the attitudes, knowledge, skills, and behaviors required to function effectively within an organization.” Thankfully, most companies no longer have a sink-or-swim mentality regarding new employees. They have recognized the costs associated with recruiting, hiring, and training new employees, and they want to retain top candidates. In order to do so, they attempt to help new hires transition into the workplace as quickly and as smoothly as possible.

That’s the good news for you as a new employee.

That doesn’t mean you don’t have a part to play in the onboarding process, though. Here are five quick tips to ease the transition from recent grad to entry-level employee.


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1. Onboarding is a two-way street.

When you’re a new entry-level employee, you’ll have a reasonable amount of jitters on your first day of work (and beyond). You’ll feel concerned about what to wear, who to talk to, and how to behave during meetings. This is totally normal.

But if it eases your mind, just remember that onboarding—the process of acclimation—is a two-way street. Your employer is just as concerned about making a great first impression on YOU as you are about making a great first impression on her. Does your new employer treat you well on your first day? Did your new coworkers greet you or ignore you? Did your supervisor have materials and office supplies waiting for you, or did you have to wait for three days for a computer to be set up? These might seem like minor details, but they’re really not. Pay attention to the way you’re treated.

There are many common onboarding mistakes employers make that reflect negatively on the employer and affect their ability to retain great employees (like you!). The way your employer (not just your supervisor, but everyone in the company) treats you speaks volumes about the corporate culture and work environment. This helps you make your decision about whether this company is a good long-term fit for you as an employee.

2. Don’t glaze over during orientation.

Even though orientation at many companies can seem a little dry (okay, ahem, boring), the information covered can actually be important. While the information covered may not be presented in the most entertaining manner, it’s probably information you need to either perform your job well or to function well in the workplace. Either way, attempt to pay attention rather than zone out by playing with apps on your phone. Not only will you appear to be a more engaged employee to your new employer, but you’ll also retain more of the content covered (which might come in handy later when you’re expected to remember it).

3. Stick around during breaks/lunch.

It’s easy to give into the temptation to skip out during breaks or during lunch and dinner invitations, which are totally optional, but that’s when you have the opportunity to truly network with your coworkers and supervisors. Not only will you build genuine working relationships with others, but you’ll also learn more about company culture by attending these “off the record” events. You’ll see people’s true colors and be more likely to enjoy the next day’s “on the record” events if you connect well with your coworkers over dinner the night before.

4. Ask questions.

If you’re sitting through a training session or orientation workshop and feel confused or have a question, speak up! Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Many new hires often feel too intimidated to ask questions and wind up struggling in the workplace for weeks, or even months, as a result.

If you’re too intimidated to speak up during a large meeting, take notes and ask your supervisor questions later.

5. Get a mentor (or two).

Many companies now provide new employees, particularly recent college graduates, with official mentors. However, you may want to consider seeking out your own mentors. It’s never a bad idea to find one mentor in your company (someone with at least a few years of experience) and another mentor in your “dream” career field. This person might wind up being your career mentor for life, so select someone you truly admire and whose career path you may want to emulate. A career mentor can provide guidance from time to time and advice when times are tough in your career journey. It helps to hear an objective voice and encouraging word from someone you admire.

You’ve already done the tough part of landing a great entry-level job; just continue preparing yourself for those first few months of work as you transition into a brand new employee. You’re going to do a fabulous job.

For more onboarding tips, read our blog and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

Posted April 06, 2016 by

Social media enhances recruiting efforts

Recruitment, human resources, hiring, employment concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

Social media can enhance the recruiting efforts of hiring managers. Because college students and recent graduates love social media, recruiters should use it to highlight their companies in a positive light. That doesn’t just mean the work itself but also the company culture. One company using social media this way in college recruiting is Lockton.

More than 5,600 professionals at Lockton provide 48,000 clients around the world with risk management, insurance, employee benefits consulting, and retirement services that improve their businesses. From its founding in 1966 in Kansas City, Missouri, Lockton has attracted entrepreneurial professionals who have driven its growth to become the largest privately held, independent insurance broker in the world and 10th largest overall. For seven consecutive years, Business Insurance magazine has recognized Lockton as a “Best Place to Work in Insurance.”

Kelly Dippold, Senior Recruiting Specialist at Lockton, discusses how her company uses social media in college recruiting to reflect its company culture.

“At Lockton, we recently launched two social media programs to help recruit college students.

First, we created the hashtag #LocktonLife and began using it on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and in all of our college recruiting materials. Our goal is to show college students what it’s really like working at Lockton and that insurance is more than writing policies and processing claims. Photos and posts with #LocktonLife show associates giving back to the community, having fun inside and outside of work (think ping pong and Mardi Gras), and engaging in wellness activities like Lockton 5k events.

Then, we invited associates from across the country to join us as brand ambassadors. Using their own personal social media networks, these brand ambassadors shared even more photos and posts using #LocktonLife and encouraged others in their offices to do the same. We now have about 30 brand ambassadors in cities like Washington, D.C., Denver, Houston, and Los Angeles posting pictures of charity events, happy hours, team-building activities, and more.

On Friday March 4th, we hosted Lockton University Day at our headquarters in Kansas City. Students met, mingled, and learned from young Lockton Associates and leaders, and were encouraged to post on social media using #LocktonLife and tagging us (@Lockton, @LocktonBenefits, and @Lockton_Retire) for the chance to win fun prizes. We hope our social media campaign added some excitement to the event and helped spread the word that Lockton is a rewarding, fast-paced, and fun place to work.”

If you’re looking for more information on using social media for college recruiting, visit our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Photo of Kelly Dippold

Kelly Dippold, Senior Recruiting Specialist at Lockton

Kelly Dippold has more than 10 years of experience in recruiting and human relations in both the telecommunications and insurance industries. She joined Lockton in 2010, where she leads teams of college recruiters and has excelled in the company’s entrepreneurial, competitive, and empowering culture. Kelly earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas. Her professional designations and affiliations include Professional in Human Resources (PHR), SHRM Certified Professional (SHRM-CP) and Member, National SHRM.

Posted March 25, 2016 by

4 tips for big impact in college recruiting

When talent acquisition leaders map out their annual college recruiting plans, they should take into account the following four tips, courtesy of The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

This article includes two brief videos, hosted by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager for College Recruiter. The videos are part of a 15-video series featuring The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.


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1. Take time to plan out the process.

Think about branding. How are you making your messaging unique? What will help you stand out in the sea of emails, texts, and flyers on campus? How will you help college students remember you compared to other employers?

2. The early bird gets the worm.

Register for career fairs early. If you register early, you often get the best spot with more exposure to students who attend. If you wait too long before registering, you may not be able to attend.

Similarly, don’t wait for events to occur to reach out to students. Begin the communication process before you show up on campus and before candidates arrive on-site for interviews. Keep the doors of communication open at all times.

3. Think about who will represent you on campus.

Who will you send to represent you at career fairs and other events? This is a crucial choice in the college recruiting process. If you don’t have a well-trained team, and you send hiring managers or other employees, you should prepare these employees as well as possible. Equip them with a broad understanding of the types of skill sets you’re looking for, which positions are available, and the employer brand you’re attempting to display on campus.

Be sure that the representative you send to campus events is able to communicate clearly not only about technical skills but is also able to evaluate candidates’ soft skills.


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4. Follow up.

Following up is key to ensuring success after events end. Many companies ensure huge presence on the day of events but fail to follow up with candidates later. When top candidates weigh their options, employers who have built better relationships stand out.

 

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

Posted March 24, 2016 by

Selecting schools for college recruiting

When selecting colleges and universities to recruit from, employers must consider a variety of factors.  This article and accompanying video series, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, explore selecting schools for college recruiting in depth and features The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

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When selecting schools to recruit from, examine the career services office and resources on campus. Does the career services office offer resume books, on-campus interview opportunities, career fairs, or other opportunities for engagement with students? Not every college or university offers these events. When are these events and opportunities available? The school’s event cycle may not match your recruiting and hiring cycle. How much does the school charge for these services/events? Weigh the costs charged by the university when selecting schools to recruit from as well.

Employers must also consider how many other employers they will be competing against in comparison to the number of students/grads or candidates available. It may be better to be a large fish in a small pond. Unless you have fabulous job offers to present, you might not be able to attract top talent.

When selecting schools for college recruiting, it’s also important to evaluate student enrollment data. If you need to hire MBA graduates, and the university’s MBA program is not one of its better programs, that school may not be the best fit for your college recruiting program.

The next video provides tips about narrowing down their list of schools to recruit from.

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Employers should never be afraid to narrow down their target list for selecting schools for college recruiting from year to year. Recruiters will discover that retention is key; you may get terrific talent, but if you can’t retain star employees long-term, a particular college or university might not be the best fit for your company. The longer you recruit, the more historical data you’ll have to fall back on.

Always evaluate and assess your data. Ask the career services office for information about where their students are finding employment. Most career services directors are willing to partner with employers; career services directors who are willing to go above and beyond can help make up for lack of services and events they may not provide. Career services employees can provide employers with the chance to brand themselves on campus and to gain much-needed exposure on campus; they also keep employers in the loop and introduce recruiters to faculty members. Relationships with faculty members prove key in the college recruiting process.

In the last video, experts Dr. Steven Lindner and Dr. Domniki Demetriadou discuss the need to adapt recruiting strategy from school to school.

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The WorkPlace Group experts encourage adaptation of strategy based on the situation and school. There may be some times when it’s appropriate to post jobs online only, and some situations when it’s better to have a strong on-campus presence. It’s important to have a tiered structure around college recruiting. Not all colleges and universities are the same; whatever amount of effort you put into college recruiting will determine your outcomes.

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog, and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

 

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.