ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 17, 2018 by

Consider launching your career in the public sector: Interview with the SEC’s Jamey McNamara

 

If you looking for an internship or full-time entry-level job, you will find many opportunities within government agencies. A public sector career can feel different from a career in the private sector. To sort out the differences and help you understand whether to pursue a government job, we asked Jamey McNamara, the Deputy Chief Human Capital Officer at U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). McNamara draws his advice here from years of experience developing employees and leaders, in recruitment and retention, performance management, compensation and benefits, and labor relations.  (more…)

Posted December 21, 2016 by

Sneak peek at government internships: Securities and Exchange Commission

 

The mission of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is to protect investors, maintain fair, orderly, and efficient markets, and facilitate capital formation. If you are interested a government internship, especially related to economics, investing or the stock market, consider the SEC. We heard from Temeka Thompson, the Recruitment Outreach Program Manager at SEC. She shared about how they hire and utilize interns.

Sometimes interns are seen as performing grunt work only. What’s the attitude at Securities and Exchange about interns?

Temeka Thompson: Interns are considered valued contributors and perform a wide array of duties and responsibilities while on their internship. Legal students conduct research/fact finding, prepare briefs and memorandums for high profile cases. Business students can find themselves leading marketing campaigns, auditing and investigating programs for effectiveness. Our managers who utilize student programs believe this is an excellent opportunity to fill entry level mission needs with fresh, energetic talent, whom they highly enjoy collaborating alongside.

How do you identify the stronger candidates? What are the metrics you might use?

TT: In addition to reviewing the completed application, the resume with any financial services or legal experience is key.  One of the oldest; yet tried and true methods of identifying great interns is face to face interviewing or even now, virtual interviewing. Applicants who have the ability to address behavioral questions, have a history of taking the initiative and eagerness to learn and contribute are the interns that typically succeed and are in a better position to compete for full-time positions upon graduation.

How do you convert strong interns into full-time employees?

TT: The process is organic.  Internships are working interviews and the interns who exhibit the ability to produce, takes pride in their work products and the mission of the SEC and perform really well are in a better position to compete for full-time opportunities. 3Ls/Judicial Law Clerks (current & pending)/Legal Fellows can apply to our Chairs Attorney Honors program (a highly competitive and prestigious entry level attorney hiring program) and our Business Students have the opportunity to apply to any Pathways or full-time opportunity that best fits their skill sets.

(Big thank you to the SEC for hosting the College Recruiting bootcamp this month!) 

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Posted November 14, 2016 by

Utilizing interns: more than busy work

Intern can do more than busy work

Contributing writer Ted Bauer

Companies of all sizes frequently hire interns, but the approach to thinking about these interns is usually a little bit misguided. Because interns often represent either entirely free or very cheap (relative to full-time hires) labor, they can become factories of busy work — essentially doing work that others (i.e. full-time employees) either don’t have the time for or, in all honesty, don’t want to do.

While there’s some logic in assigning the pointless busy work to the cheapest labor source, it’s also a bad strategic play both in the short-term and long-term. Here are two major reasons why.

“Busy” vs. “productive.” Admittedly, there are many professionals — way above the intern level — who don’t completely understand this designation. And admittedly, not all work at a job can be productive. There is always logistically-driven, spreadsheet-updating, “busy” or “shallow” work to be done. But you need to think about the psychology of the intern experience, as opposed to simply the cost model. In many cases, this is an intern’s first experience with office work — or among their first. If all they do is busy work, they certainly won’t feel very motivated by your company or that specific department. (More on why this is a problem in the next section.) While we wouldn’t necessarily condone giving interns access to proprietary information or letting them set high-level strategy, they can attend some larger scope meetings to learn about how the different pieces of your organization and business model work together. Yes, they might get coffee for people or archive documents digitally from years ago. That’s fine. But there needs to be a mix of straight busy work and some productive work, including opportunities to learn about how the company works, how it generates revenue, and what the different roles do in support of that.

The value of internal recruitment: Let’s assume we are discussing summer interns for the time being, as that’s a fairly common intern time frame and model. A college summer intern who performs well could become a full-time hire when he/she finishes college. Research has shown internal recruitment (i.e. promotions) to be valuable, and the same methodology works for intern conversion. Organizations are usually set up in specific, clearly-defined ways around process and reporting. An intern who was given a summer of busy work + productive meeting attendance already understands those processes and reporting structures. When he/she enters the company, it’s much closer to a “hit the ground running” situation than recruiting someone from a different college who never interned with you. That latter hire may end up being a superstar, yes, but in the first few months, they will be much less productive than a converted intern. Also remember this about the value of interns: because they have less work experience, they haven’t been exposed to numerous approaches to work. You can more easily ground them in your culture, roles, and expectations than you can with even a mid-career professional you poached from a competitor.

Additionally, college recruitment should regularly be part of a company’s diversity recruitment strategy — precisely because the organization can start a diverse pipeline to upper management. Diversifying the workplace, which is a common goal of most orgs, begins with diversifying the intern pool and then converting those interns into FT employees.

One of the clearest paths to intern conversion is two-fold:

  • Have a strong employer brand that will resonate with young people
  • Know what success looks like in an intern role so you know whom to attempt to convert to full-time

On Thursday, December 8th at Union Station in DC, we’ll be hosting a College Recruiter Bootcamp Conference. At 1:15pm, Susan LaMotte (the CEO of exaqueo) will lead a panel on marketing your company to Gen Y and Gen Z (the next generations to enter the workplace, behind the millennials). After the topical presentation, Susan will moderate a discussion on the same topic including:

  • Panelist: Allison Lane, Director, Corporate Marketing and Communications, The Bozzuto Group
  • Panelist: Jessica Steinberg, Director, Global Talent Brand, CDK

The registration cost is $98 per person and includes all seminars/panels (you can see the other ones at the top link), continental breakfast, Union Station tour, and lunch.

In fact, the Dec. 8th event will be at the SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) offices in Union Station. They have a great intern conversion ratio, so we reached out to them for ideas around it and  to get a sneak peek at what you might learn on Dec. 8. They told us:

The process is more organic.  Internships are working interviews and the interns who exhibit the ability to produce, takes pride in their work products and the mission of the SEC and perform really well are in a better position to compete for full-time opportunities. 3Ls/Judicial Law Clerks (current & pending)/Legal Fellows can apply to our Chairs Attorney Honors program (a highly competitive and prestigious entry level attorney hiring program) and our Business Students have the opportunity to apply to any Pathways or full-time opportunity that best fits their skill sets.”

“Working interviews” is a great attitude.

We’d love to see you on December 8th in the SEC’s home. There are also panels on ROI and metrics around the recruiting space, so by attending both, you can have a more holistic picture of intern conversion and its benefits. Register today at www.exaqueoevents.com/register

Posted September 12, 2016 by

Are your interns valuable contributors or low-priority grunts?

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

Let’s be blunt here: a bad, or poorly-contextualized, hiring process can cost you lots of money and time. As a result, internal recruitment (essentially promotion from within or adjustment of roles) has gained some favor in recent years.

One of the best ways to approach internal recruitment is how you handle interns. An organization’s approach to interns typically resides somewhere between these two extremes: (more…)

Posted September 06, 2016 by

College Recruiting Bootcamp at SEC in D.C. on Thu 12/8/2016

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission office in Washington, D.C.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission office in Washington, D.C.

Now that August is history, most seem to be turning their attention to the remainder of the calendar year. An event that I think you’ll want to mark onto your calendar is our 10th College Recruiting Bootcamp.

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. In partnership with our friends at exaqueo, we’re co-hosting the College Recruiting Bootcamp on Thursday, December 8th at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission office, which is connected to Amtrak’s Union Station.

Our College Recruiting Bootcamps each provide an intensive and enjoyable day of training for talent acquisition and other human resource leaders. Attendees enjoy fast-paced, interactive learning environments because we limit keynotes and presentations to 20 minutes and panel discussions to 40 minutes. This lightning fast pace forces presenters, panel moderators, and panelists to be razor focused on their topics.

(more…)

Posted April 21, 2016 by

TalentBlend, the only conference to TA program managers, is next week in D.C.

TalentBlend logoTwo of my favorite people in the world of talent acquisition are Kara Yarnot and Moe Hutt of Meritage Talent Solutions. Together they have over 30 years of talent acquisition project and program management experience.

I first became acquainted with the dynamic duo back when they were leading the talent acquisition efforts for the massive, federal government contractor, SAIC. A few years ago they apparently decided that they could no longer fight the entrepreneurial bug and so set off on their own to create Meritage Talent Solutions. One of the first things that organization did was create the TalentBlend conference. Unlike other HR conferences which are either quite general or really just targeted to senior talent acquisition leaders, TalentBlend is targeted to an underserved group of very important people: program managers. These people build, optimize, and innovate talent acquisition programs, systems, tools and practices.  (more…)

Posted April 13, 2016 by

College Recruiter sponsoring premiere event in Europe for university relations leaders

Brussels, BelgiumCollege Recruiter has two primary types of users: candidates who are searching for great careers and the employers who recruit them. One way that we give back to the recruiting community is by regularly sharing our knowledge and trying our best to advance the conversations through our blog, videos, and social media. Another way is through conferences such as the dozen or so College Recruiting Bootcamp events we’ve organized to-date.

A third way that give back to the recruiting community is through our active participation in conferences organized by partners. This weekend, for example, chief executive officer Faith Rothberg will moderate a panel at TAtech (the Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions) in Orlando about how job boards can and should prevent fraud including bogus jobs which are posted for a number of reasons, one of which is identity theft. On Monday, I’ll deliver a presentation at SHRM Talent Management in Orlando about how talent acquisition leaders can use metrics to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their departments but also to get that “seat at the table” that so many crave but haven’t been able to attain because the information they share with their C-level leaders has been tactical and not strategic. About a week later I’ll be in D.C. for TalentBlend 2016. College Recruiter is a sponsor and I’m moderating a panel discussion with Alton Fox of Lockheed Martin and Temeka Thompson of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission during which we’ll talk about how leading organizations recruit students and recent graduates through off-campus channels including interactive recruitment media such as College Recruiter.

Pretty much all of the above has a U.S. focus but we’re well aware that there’s a big, beautiful world outside of our borders. Indeed, most of our Fortune 1,000 and even federal government clients have hiring needs around the world and we’re increasingly being called upon to help them with those needs. Today, for example, we’re working on a proposal for a federal government agency that has significant hiring needs for people who are U.S. citizens, live or are willing to live abroad, have college degrees, and speak both English and Spanish. These multinational projects are challenging yet a lot of fun and have led us to engage with organizations in other countries whose missions include helping students and recent graduates find great careers. An example is Gradcore, a U.K.-based organization run by my friend, Martin Edmondson. I delivered the keynote presentation at their annual conference a couple of years ago and in May we are sponsoring and helping to organize their GEC Europe conference.  (more…)