ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 23, 2016 by

4 ways to overcome lack of experience

Have you ever interviewed for a job and been rejected because of your lack of work experience?

When you’re applying for entry-level jobs or internships as a college student or recent grad, this is a pretty common experience. Even though the career services office on your campus may have barked at you incessantly about applying for internships and part-time job opportunities, and your parents breathed down your neck over break about doing seasonal work to make some extra money, you may find yourself with very little work experience to list on your resume at this point.

If that’s the case, today’s Tuesday Tip video and article are for you. College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, offers four quick tips in a 5-minute video.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Lack experience? Get some.

Alanis Morissette should have added this to her lyrical list of ironies back in 1995. Recruiters don’t have much sympathy for job seekers without experience listed on their resumes, though. If you lack experience prior to the job search, the best remedy is to seek experience. The sooner you can gain experience, the better.

The worst thing you can do for yourself is to allow yourself the luxury of feeling bad about your lack of experience. The best thing you can do for yourself is to take action. A great first step is to register at CollegeRecruiter.com and search for job opportunities in your area.

2. List all experience.

If you can’t find a full-time job, settle for part-time employment. Combine a few part-time jobs if necessary. It’s best to find part-time employment in your preferred career field, of course, because this allows you to build a repertoire of skills you can use in that great entry-level full-time job you’ll land soon.

If you can’t find a paid part-time position, consider volunteering with a non-profit organization. You might be able to use the skills gained in your academic major to help the organization; this experience can be listed on your resume as well.

Don’t forget to list other experience on your resume as well, including paid and unpaid internships and your involvement in organizations both on-campus and off-campus.

3. Compensate with strong soft skills.

Soft skills are skills which you may have acquired as a college student (but not necessarily in the classroom); these skills are a combination of personality traits and habits which make you a quality employee and a pleasant person to interact with. Research shows that people with excellent soft skills tend to perform well at work; in fact, people with strong soft skills perform just as well (and sometimes better than) people with strong technical skills.

Some of the soft skills recruiters and talent acquisition professionals are looking for including communication skills, a strong work ethic, time management ability, problem-solving skills, and ability to work well under pressure.

When you’re in an interview, think about how you can sell yourself by demonstrating your soft skills. Think in advance how you would answer questions like, Tell me about a time when you faced a difficult problem. How did you solve it?

4. Seek additional training opportunities.

If you lack training which applies to the job opportunities you’re seeking, get some! There are multiple ways to seek training. You can take an extra college course in journalism, for example, if you want to write for your local newspaper but keep getting rejected when you apply for writing positions. You might also scour the internet and newspapers for local writers groups. These groups are free to join, and not only will you learn from other writers, but you might enjoy the fellowship and constructive criticism.

Ultimately, if you lack experience related to your career field, no one can gain it on your behalf.

It’s your responsibility to stake your claim in the world of work.

Taking steps in the direction of gaining work experience can be intimidating, but you’ll feel a sense of accomplishment each time you take one more step.

Why not take one more step forward today?

Work on the draft of your resume. Submit your final draft to the free resume editors at College Recruiter. Make an appointment with the career services department at your local university. Find out when the career fair will be hosted on your campus this spring. Register and search for jobs on College Recruiter’s website.

For more Tuesday Tips, subscribe to College Recruiter’s YouTube Channel, follow our blog, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

 

 

Posted October 07, 2015 by

Create a diverse workforce by finding talent

Creating a diverse workforce requires effort from employers. However employers define diversity, they must recruit and hire the best candidates. Employers must go directly to the talent sources.

To help explore these issues, College Recruiter recently hosted a College Recruiting Bootcamp on LGBT and other diversity hiring issues on Tuesday, September 29, at the Twilio headquarters in San Francisco.

College Recruiter has been publishing the opinions from a number of talent acquisition and recruiting leaders about why and how employers should diversify their workforces. Idan Shpizear, Co-Founder and CEO of 911 Restoration, explains how employers can create diversity in the workforce by finding the talent they need. (more…)

Posted January 14, 2014 by

Top 10 Reasons Why Employers Should Not Hire Interns

Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

By Mark Mehler and Gerry Crispin of CareerXroads

Recently we were reminded that we wrote this Letterman-like list 10 years ago for teens4hire.org. The site’s founder wondered if we wanted to update it. What do you think? Even fewer firms hire teens today.

10. You just don’t like teens. You’ve got enough of them at home already.

9. You downsized recently and people are doing two jobs so there is no time to oversee teens who might be helpful to these highly stressed employees. (more…)

Posted June 03, 2013 by

Job Hunting Tips For Teens

John Challenger of Challenger, Gray & Christmas

John Challenger of Challenger, Gray & Christmas

As summer break gets underway for most of the nation’s high school and college students, many have already started summer jobs at the mall, day camps, amusement parks and movie theaters.  Those who were unable to secure a job offer may assume it is too late, but nothing could be further from the truth, according to one employment authority.

“We expect summer hiring to improve from last year’s pace, which could mean steady hiring through at least July.  Many employers filling summer positions may have already completed the initial process of interviewing and hiring.  However, some employers may need more workers than expected.  Others may find that the workers they hired were not a good fit.  In any case, summer job seekers should not give up,” said John A. Challenger, chief executive officer of global outplacement consultancy Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., which provides job-search training to people who were laid off by their employers. (more…)

Posted May 21, 2013 by

29% of Employers Plan to Hire Seasonal Workers to Fill Summer Job Openings

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

Brent Rasmussen of Careerbuilder

Seasonal hiring expectations this summer mark a continued improvement over the years immediately following the recession, according to a new survey. Nearly three in ten employers (29 percent) report they plan to hire seasonal workers this summer. While unchanged from 2012, the number is significantly up from an average of 21 percent from 2008 to 2011.

The nationwide survey—conducted for Careerbuilder online by Harris Interactive© from February 11 to March 6, 2013— included more than 2,000 hiring managers and human resource professionals across industries and company sizes.

Employers in leisure and hospitality (47 percent), manufacturing (34 percent), information technology (34 percent) and retail (33 percent) are the most likely to hire seasonal help this summer. More than half of all employers (53%) will complete their seasonal hiring in May or June.

“The summer forecast shows yet again that although the jobs recovery has been slow, employers are more confident today than they were three or four years ago,” said Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America. “Seasonal work –whether in retail or engineering – is also a good entry point into the labor force for job seekers, as a vast majority of employers – 67 percent – will consider summer hires for permanent positions.” (more…)

Posted October 26, 2012 by

How to Turn a Seasonal, Temporary Job Into a Permanent Career

Climbing the corporate ladder

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Thirty-nine percent of employers who are hiring seasonal help plan to transition some employees into full-time, permanent staff, up from 30 percent in 2011. To stand out as a candidate for a long-term opportunity, hiring managers recommended the following:

  • Provide above and beyond customer service. Offer help instead of waiting to be asked for it – 53 percent
  • Proactively ask for more projects – 46 percent
  • Let the employer know up front that you’re interested in permanent employment – 46 percent
  • Present ideas on how to do something better or try something new – 34 percent
  • Ask thoughtful questions about the organization – 32 percent

Source: Careerbuilder

Posted October 25, 2012 by

5 Top Cities For Job Seekers Looking for Seasonal Work

Matt Ferguson of CareerbuilderRetailers are stocking their stores with more than just merchandise going into the holiday season – they are also adding more seasonal help, according to a new survey. Thirty-six percent of retailers plan to have extra hands on deck around the holidays, a healthy jump from 29 percent in 2011. The survey was conducted for Careerbuilder by Harris Interactive among more than 2,400 employers between August 13 and September 6, 2012.

While seasonal hiring is expected across the entire country, the five cities with the largest economies and plans to hire include: (more…)