• Growing Your STEM Career

    October 20, 2016 by

    Love your science careerGuest writer Luciana Amaro, Vice President Talent Development & Strategy, BASF

    The STEM workforce is crucial to America’s global competitiveness. STEM graduates have more career opportunities now than any other time in U.S. history. This three-part series from BASF, a global chemical company, examines ways that recent college grads can establish a strong foundation to join the next generation of scientists and engineers. The first post in this series examined the different education paths to consider when preparing for a STEM and the second post examined the STEM career opportunities available. 

    STEM employment will increase rapidly: about 13 percent between 2012 and 2022, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In fact, the U.S. Department of Commerce estimates that STEM jobs will outgrow non-STEM jobs by almost two to one.

    If you are planning a career in STEM, you should know which areas are expected to have the most job openings. For instance, the fastest-growing STEM undergraduate degrees in 2013 were statistics, computer information technology, administration and management, and environmental health engineering, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

    Once you’ve landed your STEM job, how do you advance your career?

    Forward-thinking companies recognize the importance of creating a strong internal talent pipeline in order to fill the skills gap, and seek to attract and retain employees with growth potential. Many businesses now provide unique opportunities for employees to design their career in a variety of ways and explore multiple job functions within a variety of disciplines, rather than limit professional development to a linear career ladder.

    A great way to learn about other jobs is to immerse yourself in the company as a whole, and look for opportunities to participate in projects or interests that are outside of your job description. Some companies offer employees the chance to work with different groups and take on new responsibilities, exposing them to other roles from both an upward and lateral perspective. For example, BASF offers leadership development programs to help employees master new skills and discover additional talents. We organize these programs as rotational assignments, which provide entry-level hires with diverse working experiences. This is a good way to build their skills and professional network through cross-business training programs in areas such as marketing, engineering and supply chain management.

    Get creative

    Previous generations typically followed a linear career plan. However, today’s workforce seeks career experiences that are diverse, engaging and innovative. BASF offers unique non-linear career journeys, described as “career roadmaps” rather than “career paths.” For example, a manufacturing engineer working in plastics can use his or her product knowledge to switch over to a marketing position. Mid- or senior-level employees in the same field may have had very different career journeys that landed them in similar positions.

    It’s important to take ownership of your career goals, rather than adhering to the conventional belief that you need to perform at a certain level to reach a certain role by a particular age. Businesses today are empowering employees to embrace the freedom to creatively pursue their career goals. Through formal mentoring programs along with advanced training and education opportunities, companies are helping employees shape their aspirations and continue to develop their skills both on and off the job.

    It’s important to have regular conversations with your supervisor to set career goals for yourself and track your performance. If you discover a passion in an area outside your particular realm, see how you can work together to integrate new responsibilities into your role or transition into a new position.

    The STEM industry offers great flexibility to explore new interests and opportunities on and off the job. If you are an entry-level employee, be sure to keep an open mind and be willing to try new things. You may be surprised by where your career takes you.

    luciana-amaroLuciana Amaro is a Vice President in BASF Corporation’s Human Resources department, leading the Talent Development and Strategy unit.  In her current role, which she assumed on August 1, 2014, she is responsible for North American talent management, leadership development, staffing and university relations, workforce planning, learning and development, organizational development and change management.

  • Exploring STEM Career Opportunities

    October 13, 2016 by

    1392453Guest writer Luciana Amaro, Vice President Talent Development & Strategy, BASF

    The STEM workforce–science, technology, engineering and mathematics–is crucial to America’s global competitiveness. Today’s STEM graduates have more career opportunities now than at any other time in U.S. history. This three-part series from BASF, the world’s leading chemical company, examines ways that college students and new grads can establish a strong foundation that equips them to join the next generation of scientists and engineers. Read the previous post about different paths to consider when preparing for a career in STEM.

    Students entering the STEM industry today have more career opportunities than ever before. That’s because there will be an estimated shortfall of 2 million workers in manufacturing over the next decade, with six out of every 10 positions going unfilled due to a skills gap (Deloitte). Simply put: we don’t have enough STEM grads to meet the demand.

    This shortfall has created fierce competition among companies seeking the best scientists, technicians, engineers and mathematicians. For example, if you are a petroleum engineer, your field will grow 10 percent by 2024 due to increased oil production in the U.S.

    As a new STEM job candidate, where should you look?

    Making an impact

    Many truly game-changing positions that impact society require a degree in a STEM discipline. Feeding a hungry world, developing housing, improving transportation and creating innovative energy solutions all require a STEM education. Some of the exciting positions open today include:

    • Research and development scientists who are discovering alternative fuel options;
    • Software developers and industrial designers who are inventing the next smartphone or life-saving medical device; and
    • Structural and mechanical engineers who are improving infrastructure and building bridges.

    With a breadth of jobs available, it is important to select a company that offers broad opportunities for innovation and advancement.

    Landing the role

    To land your dream job, begin building a professional network. One great way to do this is by joining a professional association such as the AIChE (American Institute of Chemical Engineers) and NAM (National Association of Manufacturers). Associations offer a specialized network of professionals with similar values and goals, which can be incredibly helpful as you seek a mentor to help guide your career development. You can also join a group on LinkedIn such as STEM Educators & Researchers or MentorNet, where you can interact with other professionals to better understand their positions and solicit their advice.

    Reaping the benefits  

    Many careers in the STEM fields promote innovation and allow you to be at the forefront of emerging ideas. The myriad career options also allow you to explore different areas to uncover your passions. For instance, you may begin your career in plastics but later discover that agriculture is more interesting. Companies such as BASF provide young professionals the opportunity to discuss their career roadmap with their supervisor in order to determine their preference in becoming a generalist or a specialist in a particular area.

    A STEM career can pay well. The starting salary for a petroleum engineer is $88,700 and a nuclear engineer is $62,900. Jobs in the STEM industry on average pay about 1.7 times the national average, according to the BLS.

    While compensation is important, there are other considerations that you should take into account before selecting a role and employer. For example, at BASF we offer a rewards program that encourages work-life balance, professional development programs, and travel opportunities.

    Read next week’s post in our series, “Growing Your Career in STEM.”

    luciana-amaroLuciana Amaro is a Vice President in BASF Corporation’s Human Resources department, leading the Talent Development and Strategy unit.  In her current role, which she assumed on August 1, 2014, she is responsible for North American talent management, leadership development, staffing and university relations, workforce planning, learning and development, organizational development and change management.

  • What kind of degrees can be pursued online?

    May 21, 2016 by
    Learn photo by StockUnlimited.com

    Photo by StockUnlimited.com

    The availability of online colleges has increased drastically even just over the last 10 years, and with that change, the degree offerings have also become more widespread. Today, students can find almost any degree level or major offered through an online institution. With a little effort and commitment, they can find a career path that works for them and take them where they want to go. So, consider all of the possibilities offered today when it comes to online degrees.

    Certification levels

    Previously, the certification levels provided through online colleges were limited, but today, students can find degrees at any level to meet their needs. Here’s an overview of certifications and degrees available at most colleges and universities.

    •Certification: Many professional fields require ongoing certification to keep a license up-to-date. Fortunately, there are many certification program options, including those in medicine, education, counseling, and even business.

    •Associate Degree: Two-year associate degree programs are a good choice for many career options, and online institutions typically offer a wide variety of programs at this level.

    •Bachelor’s Degree: These four-year degrees are among the most popular online degree programs. Most online schools offer the widest variety of bachelor’s degree programs.

    •Master’s Degree: These options used to be much less common, but students can now find online programs to obtain an MBA, MS, M.Ed., or MA.

    •Doctoral Degree: This level of degree is still the rarest to be found on the internet; however, even doctorate degrees are increasingly offered online today. There are a variety of options ranging from business to education and even theology.

    Majors

    Many students believe they’ll be limited in their major choice if they choose to opt for an online program, but that simply isn’t the case. Online colleges offer a wide range of major options, including those in humanities, fine arts, business, finance, technology, science, health, medicine, education, and even law and criminal justice.

    Specialized degrees

    Today’s online colleges are even equipped to offer a wide range of specialized degree programs, such as a board certified behavior analyst program that can teach students to see the big picture. These degrees require specific preparation and advanced techniques that make them perfect candidates for an individualized online program. To pursue endorsement through a program like the behavior analyst certification, students are often required to complete specific prerequisites prior to applying for the program to ensure their success.

    There are more online degree options available today than ever before. Online colleges offer programs at all different certification levels, as well as degree programs in various subjects. The possibilities are unlimited.

    Are you thinking about going back to school? Find college majors with top entry-level jobs and go to our blog. Also, follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

    Rachelle Wilber, guest writer

    Rachelle Wilber, guest writer

    Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook: @RachelleWilber; https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009221637700

  • Planning for college recruitment

    March 23, 2016 by

    Creating a college recruitment program from scratch is a daunting task. This 3-part video series featuring The WorkPlace Group (WPG) experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, provides talent acquisition leaders with suggestions and guidelines for starting their own college recruitment programs.

    The video series is hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace. Part 1 provides talent acquisition professionals tips about getting started when planning a college recruitment program.


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    The first place to start when planning a college recruitment program is to identify objectives for developing a college recruitment program. This helps identify internship opportunities within the organization; this transfers into considering which degrees match up with internship needs. After this, employers must consider their resources. Resources include not only budgetary items but also time, staffing hours, and travel time.

    Dr. Demetriadou advises her clients to determine “what [they] need, where [they] need it, and how much [they] are willing to invest in the process.”

    Part 2 helps college recruiters with the school selection process.


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    Once college recruiters have identified their objectives and resources, it’s time to do an environmental scan. One of the factors to consider is geography. Will staff need to travel to conduct campus recruiting visits and OCIs (on campus interviews)? Will students need to travel to visit the employer facility/headquarters?

    Another factor to keep in mind is diversity, particularly in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields. If the university is large, but the demographics do not offer a diverse candidate pool, recruiters may want to remove the university from the target list or consider re-prioritization.

    It’s also important to consider whether it’s more beneficial to recruit nationally or regionally. It may be helpful to create a tiered list for college recruiting.

    Consider the curriculum at the universities. Do they match with the available internships and entry-level jobs?

    These are just a few of the factors to consider when doing an environmental scan when planning for college recruitment.

    Part 3 wraps up the college recruitment planning process and discusses how to narrow down the school selection list.


    If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

    Although there is no such thing as having too large a list of schools during the planning phase or beginning stages of the college recruitment planning process, Dr. Steven Lindner mentions that part of the college recruitment process is narrowing down the target list for college recruiting. He reminds viewers that there is a difference between visiting schools and recruiting from them.

    In the beginning, it’s great to keep college recruiting options broad to ensure meeting objectives. However, as recruiters consider their resources, they must narrow down the target list significantly in order to work within the constraints of their budgets.

    Dr. Demetriadou reminds viewers to “think big, but implement small.”

    Continue reading our blog for more featured articles with The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Steven Lindner and Dr. Domniki Demetriadou. For more videos and tips about the timeline for developing a great college recruitment program, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

    Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

    Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

    Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

     

     

    Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

    Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

    Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

    companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

  • LGBTQ equality in STEM workforce

    September 28, 2015 by

    A recent press release discusses a new project with the Rowan University Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering in New Jersey partnering with other universities to advance LGBTQ equality in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Research shows that STEM students and professionals are not as comfortable on campus compared to students and professionals in other fields. The project also promotes a diverse workforce in STEM fields by encouraging LGBTQ equality through recruitment efforts.

    To help explore these issues, College Recruiter is hosting a College Recruiting Bootcamp on LGBT and other diversity hiring issues on Tuesday, September 29th at the Twilio headquarters in San Francisco. Join us.

    Prior to that event, we’ll publish the opinions from a number of talent acquisition and recruiting leaders about why and how employers should diversify their workforces. Dr. Stephanie Farrell, Professor of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University, provides insight into Rowan University’s project. Continue Reading

  • 5 Ways Technology can Help you Do Well in Your College Science Classes

    April 13, 2015 by
    Woman on a laptop computer, working with a group of female university students of computer science, programming code

    Woman on a laptop computer, working with a group of female university students of computer science, programming code. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    STEM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This acronym is used by the U.S. Department of Education when developing policies that will increase U.S. global competitiveness in the field of technology development. It’s been said that science and technology are advancing at such a rapid rate that, as a college student, much of what you’re learning right now may be obsolete by the time you graduate. However, here are some ways that technology is helping students succeed in science classes today, as well as preparing them for the advances of the future. Continue Reading

  • College Recruiting Bootcamp: How to Hire Diverse STEM Students and Grads

    March 28, 2015 by

    Verizon headquarters in Basking Ridge, NJIs your organization struggling with its efforts to recruit and retain diverse, college and university recent graduates and students for your science, technology, engineering, and math roles? Almost every organization struggles to recruit and retain these highly sought after STEM candidates yet many of these same organizations are seeing real success in a number of areas.

    Join your fellow university relations, talent acquisition, and other human resource leaders from corporate, non-profit, and government organizations the afternoon of Monday, May 18th at the headquarters of Verizon for a highly interactive, collegial, and informative moderator-led discussion on the best practices for recruiting and retaining diverse STEM candidates from colleges and universities. Continue Reading

  • Four types of colleges around the world where you should aspire to study

    March 11, 2015 by
    Young, pretty female college student sitting in a classroom full of students during class

    Young, female college student sitting in a classroom full of students during class. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    Studying in one of the top rated colleges is a no brainer for most students. Given their financial and academic achievements, allow them to study in international top colleges, college students, ensure they do get the experience of being in the most highly rated colleges. When we talk about college itself, we must understand it is an institution where students learn more niche aspect of their courses and which helps them decide the field they belong to. For example, a business student will study core business courses in the college in order to further strengthen his business background so when he goes to a university, he can decide which business field to select and belong to.

    So this means it does not necessarily mean which one particular college could give everything to students. This is the reason there are different colleges meant to study different courses and career paths. It is highly recommended that students chose colleges of specialization, which means they should select a college that completely specializes in the kind of program they are looking for. Having said that, today our blog will focus on four different types of colleges around the world, where students should aspire to study based on their future objectives. Continue Reading

  • Why you should pursue a Career as a Dentist

    January 27, 2015 by
    Portrait of a dentist who treats teeth of young woman patient

    Portrait of a dentist who treats teeth of young woman patient. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    Do you want to pursue a career as a dentist? You most likely have already given dentistry some consideration. Whether you have decided or not if you want to become a dentist, here are some benefits that you are likely to enjoy if you choose to join this noble profession. Continue Reading

  • Employers Plan to Hire 8.3% More College Grads Than Last Year

    November 14, 2014 by

    NACE logoA number of our employer clients have told me that they’re finding it harder to recruit well qualified recent graduates and students from one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities as well as graduate schools. I recently saw a study that explains why.

    The National Association of Colleges and Employers Job Outlook 2015 report indicated that employers plan to hire 8.3 percent more new college graduates from the Class of 2015 for their U.S. operations than they did from the Class of 2014. There was also substantial growth reported for non-USA positions, although not quite as substantial: non-USA hiring of recent grads and students was expected to increase by 3.2 percent. The overall reported increase was 7.5 percent. Continue Reading