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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted May 03, 2013 by

How Recent College Grads Can Negotiate Starting Salaries

Professionals shaking handsIn a recent study, nearly half of employers reported they would pay recent college graduates $30,000 to $49,999 this year, and 25 percent reported they would pay $50,000 or more. When asked what they would be willing to negotiate when extending a job offer to a recent college graduate, 27 percent of employers said they would consider increasing starting salaries and a significant number said they would also be willing to negotiate other hard benefits such as tuition reimbursement and bonuses or soft benefits such as flexible schedules and telecommuting opportunities.

The percentages of employers who said they would negotiate benefits with recent college graduates being considered for entry-level jobs were: (more…)

Posted August 15, 2012 by

How to Use LinkedIn to Negotiate Salary

For our entire childhood, homework seemed like a chore or even punishment.

“OK class, take out your homework!”
“Go upstairs and do your homework!”
“You’re not watching any TV until you’ve finished your homework!”

Aw, mom. But there’s a reason your parents and teachers insisted on this extra activity. When taken seriously, the extra work and practice prepares you to excel in a given task, be it algebra or literature.

“Do your homework” is also the first thing any expert will tell you when preparing for a job interview or salary negotiation. Unfortunately, like an antsy teenager hoping to get back to a game of Call of Duty, the average job-seeker just looks over the basics when preparing for a negotiation. Sure, he might check some competitive salaries online, talk to a friend or two, or have some dollar figures in mind, but is he really, truly prepared? (more…)

Posted February 17, 2012 by

How Career Coaches Help Job Seekers

Laura Labovich of Aspire! Empower! Career Strategy GroupEach month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) publishes an Economic News Release outlining the duration-of-unemployment in the United States. As of February 3rd, 2012, the numbers indicate that longer than six month job searches still prevail. According to the survey, in January 19.3 percent of job seekers found work in less than 5 weeks; 22.4 percent in 5 to 14 weeks; 15.4 percent in 15 to 26 weeks; and the majority, 42.9 percent, found that their job search extended past 27 weeks.

According to Laura M. Labovich, founder of Aspire! Empower! Career Strategy Group, a DC-based career firm, “As a job seeker, getting expert career advice at the onset of a search is critical, and can shorten the duration of unemployment in the long run.” (more…)