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Posted May 02, 2016 by

6 things to do before starting a new job

Welcome on board - businesswoman holding white sign with text in the office courtesy of Shutterstock.com

docstockmedia/Shutterstock.com

It’s the time of year when many college seniors begin thinking about what they will do after graduation. Most students focus on the interview process but may not have thought about what to do when they are offered full-time jobs. It can be both exciting and scary but starting a first professional job is now part of the imminent future. Although many students have worked part-time and participated in internships, starting a full-time job is a different venture. Student life is unique in many ways, so it’s important for soon-to-be graduates to make a few changes before they begin new entry-level jobs.

1) Look the part

College doesn’t have a dress code, but most jobs do. To be taken seriously, it’s a good idea for students to know what most of their colleagues will be wearing. Some offices will require a suit and tie, but most are now business casual. One of the most common mistakes new employees make is showing up to the office in attire that’s too informal.

2) Practice the importance of being prompt

Probably the most undervalued asset new employees can possess is promptness in communication. In addition to being to work on time or early, new employees should learn how important it is to stay in communication with the team. It’s fairly common for college students to forget about emailing professors or their peers because they’re mostly relying on social media to be in touch. However, new employees who don’t respond to a colleague’s or supervisor’s email or phone call will be viewed as unreliable. If something is going to take 24 hours to complete, be sure to send a quick note that communicates this information.

3) Get into a daily routine

College classes can be held at 7:30 in the morning or 10:30 at night, and most students will have significant breaks to work on self-study throughout the day. Most office jobs, however, are from eight to five (although flexible work schedules are becoming more common). It’s important to get into a routine of getting up early and dealing with the morning commute and also having enough down time later in the day to be prepared to do it all again tomorrow.

4) Gather paperwork

Once students graduate and start new jobs, they’ll be very busy adjusting to their new responsibilities. Gather any academic paperwork needed prior to the first day on the job. This can include official transcripts, letters of recommendation, references, networking contacts, or anything else that might be needed in a particular field. Many employers will ask for this paperwork, so it’s better to have it on hand and readily available.

5) Chat with your mentor

It’s a great idea to sit down with a mentor before starting a new job. A mentor will have specific and valuable insight into a particular field and perhaps even a specific company or manager. Take any advice available in order to be successful the first few months of a new career. Mentors can also help ease anxiety and build confidence that can make those first few weeks run smoothly.

6) Get organized

Graduating from college is a huge transition and can leave students feeling their lives are in disarray. Each person’s situation will be different, but it’s important to begin a new job feeling organized. Whether this means settling into a new home, moving across the country, or just getting paperwork in order, an organized lifestyle will help a person be more professional and help them focus on making a great impression in the workplace.

Want more advice for recent graduates going into the workforce? Check out our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Robyn Scott, guest writer

Robyn Scott, guest writer

Robyn Scott, a guest writer for College Recruiter, is a private tutor with TutorNerds LLC. She has a BA from the University of California, Irvine, and a MA from the University of Southampton, UK.

Posted April 02, 2016 by

How to avoid 5 common study slip-ups

Female college student studying in a library courtesy of Shutterstock.com

michaeljung/Shutterstock.com

Highly effective students know how to study. They pace themselves and don’t save all of their studying for the last minute. They also know how to take notes along the way to make their studying more efficient. Cramming and other last-minute study techniques can leave them exhausted, and incapable of performing well on test day. Use these ideas to improve your study system, and get a better grade this time around.

1. Avoid cramming

If you absolutely have to cram before a test, try to take breaks. Sleep is important for learning, so find a few hours to sleep after a long study session, and you’ll be better able to think clearly during the test. Research shows the first sleep cycle lasts about three hours. After that, we dip in and out every one and a half hours. Try to sleep from three to four and a half hours before your test.

2. Create a habit

Studying at the same time every day allows students to study better for their tests and make time for important assignments. Pick a time when you are unlikely to be disturbed and aim for the same time each day. You’ll get a better study session, and your brain will start to become used to your study routine.

3. Study locations

The place where students study is important. If they find they study best in the library, they should make a habit of getting out of their dorms or apartments, and getting to the library first thing. Make home a safe place from school work, and find places outside of it to work hard and for preparation. This way, home can become a place to relax, unwind, and have some fun.

4. Set specific goals

If you’re working toward a master’s in higher education, your goals should be specific and relate not only to your coursework, but your future career. Create lesson plans to start building the skills to become a teacher. Conduct mock lectures when teaching the material you’re learning in school to an imaginary classroom. This will not only show what you haven’t learned, but will prepare you to become a more effective educator. The same goes if you plan to intern as a scientist in the lab or research assistant. Come up with appropriate scenarios and hands-on study that prepare you for your future career and still help you learn the material.

5. Don’t procrastinate

Treat studying like a job. The most important thing to remember is students don’t have to be in the mood for studying. Studying is a process, and they may have some good days and some bad days. It’s okay to have a bad study session. Don’t let your mood affect whether you’re going to study. Push through and make your habits stick, and the rest is easy.

If you’re going for a long study session, start with the most difficult subjects first. Move on to the easier subjects when fatigue becomes a factor. Remember to take frequent breaks, and eat foods high in protein and carbs to sustain your energy levels and to prevent dips in energy.

If you’re looking for more study tips, go to the College Recruiter blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Brooke Chaplan

Brooke Chaplan, guest writer

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

Posted October 07, 2015 by

Getting into the job search routine after vacation

Job search career hiring opportunity employment concept

Job search career hiring opportunity employment concept. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Late summer and early fall brings many things. The welcome scent of pumpkin spice wafts through our favorite coffee shops, department stores inexplicably begin decorating for Thanksgiving and Christmas, and college students begin returning to school after a restful summer vacation. If you are one of these college students, you are probably just beginning to get back into the groove of things. You’ve probably begun adjusting to a new sleep schedule, memorized where your classes are, and otherwise made the transition back to school. This is great, but have you also gotten your job search on track? After all, if you are like most students, looking for a job was probably not a high priority over the summer. Now that you are back in school and getting back to business, why not kick your job search efforts into high gear? (more…)

Posted June 29, 2015 by

Heading to College: 6 things to Consider to Enhance your Education Experience

Closeup of a personal calendar setting an important date representing a time schedule. The words Start University written on a white notebook to remind you an important appointment.

Closeup of a personal calendar setting an important date representing a time schedule. The words Start University written on a white notebook to remind you an important appointment. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

According to a recent National Student Clearinghouse report, only 40 percent of college students finish their degree from start to finish while another 30 percent drop out. Getting a college education has lifelong benefits for your personal life and career. Below explains six different ways that will enhance your educational experience and help you succeed at college. (more…)

Posted April 29, 2015 by

How important is time management for students?

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

We all know the college carefree life when every adult problem seems so distant and far way that we don’t even care about it. A student’s life is all about discovering and experimenting and finally realizing what makes you happy (if you are lucky). So, is it important to think about life, serious issues, job skills and other “serious” stuff during the college years or should you try to have the best time of your life and leave all these things after your graduate? (more…)

Posted March 13, 2015 by

12 Tips for Studying Abroad

Sarah Landrum photo

Sarah Landrum

It hits you the moment the plane touches down – you’re in a new country, and an exciting journey is about to begin.

Studying abroad is filled with new places, people and experiences that will teach you things you cannot learn in your homeland. It can also be a bit overwhelming at times, but no worries. Here are 12 tips to help you make the most of your time abroad: (more…)

Posted October 16, 2014 by

How to Find the Best Career Path

Direction sign and board with career choice way

Direction sign and board with career choice way. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Finding the dream job has never been easy. While some people strike it lucky from the very first try, others struggle for years to find the best career path that would suit both their interests and their financial expectations. If you want to belong to the first category, you should know there are several things you can do about it and a series of factors to consider. (more…)

Posted October 16, 2014 by

How to Stay Active and Energetic every day at Work?

Business woman stretching in office

Business woman stretching in office. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

It’s challenging for a lot of people to work in an energetic manner every day. You must have experienced this problem if you work behind a desk and use your computer to get most of the work done. You can feel vigorous by adding some physical activities to your daily routine. If you don’t do that, then you will feel stressed and eventually face health-related issues.

Here are some tips for you that will keep you from getting lazy and allow you to stay super-active throughout the day: (more…)

Posted July 10, 2014 by

College Graduates, Don’t Like Your Current Jobs? 3 Ways to Make Them More Pleasant

There are probably some college graduates who don’t like their jobs.  However,  the following post shares three ways to help grads make their jobs a little more pleasant.

When you’re having a bad day at work, it’s easy to fantasize about an entirely different career solving all your problems. While a new job or environment could be a better fit, focusing only on your external circumstance negates the impact of one important factor: You. Your habits and attitudes

See the article here:

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Posted May 21, 2014 by

5 Ways to Enhance Your Morning Routine at Work

Do you have a morning routine once you start your day at the office?  If so, do you feel like you’re getting the most out of it?  Don’t worry, in this post you will learn five ways to enhance your routine at work, and more. (more…)