ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 19, 2018 by

Redefining the role of the college and university relations recruiter

Recruiting and advertising for open positions has changed. Before industrialization, virtually every place of employment was a solo or small operation. Without power, it was difficult to scale anything. All of a sudden with electricity, you could have factories with production lines. Employers needed to quickly go from having a couple people working in their facility to maybe even hundreds or thousands.

Advertising for jobs nowadays is mostly done through social media, networking, and employee referrals. When you only need to hire a few people, chances are you already know them. In that case, no advertising is needed. Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, explains that if you now have to suddenly start hiring dozens, hundreds or thousands, it’s very unlikely that you’re going to know enough people to fill those positions. Rothberg recently presented “Redefining the Role of the College and University Relations Recruiter,” and we share his takeaways here.   (more…)

Posted January 09, 2017 by

It’s hard to be a good manager, but bad management affects the bottom line

 

Contributing writer Ted Bauer

Here’s a statistic that may blow your hair back a little. Per Gallup, 82 percent of managerial hires end up being the wrong one for the company in question. Why is it so hard to be a good manager, and why do so many companies perpetuate bad management? If this 82% stat is true, but there are still companies making tons of profits each year, does bad management truly affect the bottom line?

Why is it so hard to be a good manager?

Laszlo Bock is the VP of People (commonly thought of as Human Resources) at Google. Last year, he gave an interview to UPenn’s Wharton Business School — and within the interview, he hits on a core problem of good management. In his words:

The reason you get promoted is because you’ve done good work, you’ve hit your goals, you’ve made good decisions. You’re in this job, and of course, you immediately want to make good decisions, hit your goals, move things forward. You forget that when you’re an employee you want your manager helping and giving you advice and then kind of getting out of your way.

As a manager, your whole mindset shifts. [Y]ou start saying, I gotta make sure everyone delivers. I gotta micromanage. I gotta watch things. It’s not intuitive as a manager to give people more freedom and back off. That’s one of the things we’ve discovered — that you have to limit the power of managers. Then people perform way, way better.

One of the more popular business books of the past 20 years, Marshall Goldsmith’s What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, refers to this same concept: namely, management isn’t intuitive to most people. Instead of thinking about their new direct reports as people with lives and contexts of their own, many new managers think of employees as productivity targets or KPIs. Limiting the power of managers can actually make organizations more effective, counterintuitive as that might be on face.

The other issue with bad management is training. Per research, most people receive their first managerial role at age 30. Their first managerial training, though, isn’t until age 42. Not all managerial trainings are created equal — some might potentially regress a manager — but to go over a decade between “becoming a manager” and “getting trained to be a manager” is a significant issue.

What’s the tie to the bottom line?

Tony Robbins makes an excellent point about organizations scaling in this interview with Tim Ferriss. The argument is this: at some point, a company is 2-3 people (the founders). Eventually that becomes 5, then 10, then 20, etc. Every time you add a person and another layer, the communication channels become a little bit more frayed. Managing a three-person company vs. a 3,000-person company is hugely different. Companies are often good at scaling production for their products, but scaling the culture and managerial skill sets often gets left behind.

This has consequences. According to one set of research (admittedly from a small sample size), poor leadership costs companies $144,541.30 per day. That might be the annual salary of someone in a leadership role, and their poor leadership is costing the company that amount each day. Additional research from Northwestern has shown that poor leadership, often in the form of unclear priorities and wasted time, costs organizations $15.5 million per year. By contrast, organizations with very strong management levels often double their profits.

There are many metrics people use to attempt measuring “bad management,” and one of the most common is turnover. Bad managers obviously contribute to turnover; most research across the past 30 years has indicated people tend to leave their boss, not their actual job or company. Research from Dale Carnegie Institute at the end of 2016 showed that 41 percent of North American workers planned to try for a new job in 2017. The most-cited reason? Bad management at their current job. That’s nearly half the North American work force entering a new year with one foot out the door. Consistent turnover has many negative repercussions for a company’s bottom line, and losing four of every 10 employees in a calendar year is really bad.

How can we improve managers?

There are dozens of ideas here, but Bock’s advice above makes some sense: limit their power, or shift their focus from “managing productivity” to “managing the priorities of their people.” There’s research from MIT showing that 67 percent of senior leaders can’t name the priorities of their CEO. Once you get a few levels below that, priority assignment is a large game of telephone. As a result of these unclear goals in the middle management levels, research has shown that 21.4 million managers are contributing no economic value back to their company. That’s 17 percent of the U.S. full-time work force, and close to 42 percent of all people holding managerial titles. They could be made more effective with a shift in how they’re measured and compensated.

The other improvement could come from increased training around how to work with different styles of people, how to communicate better, how to align company strategy with daily execution, and the like. One of the most common traits of companies who regularly get on the ‘Best Places To Work’ list, such as Google or Mercedes Benz, is an almost religious commitment to training and developing people. It’s hard to expect managers to improve when they’re waiting 12 years between initial promotion and initial training.

Want more advice related to talent acquisition, retention and other HR challenges? Stay connected to College Recruiter on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted November 16, 2016 by

Job postings on College Recruiter outperform those on competitor sites by 472.4 percent

Apply NowEver hear the expression about it being important now and then to stop and smell the roses? Well, I just did that and was it ever refreshing.

A potential new client of College Recruiter challenged us to do more than just tell him that his job postings would work well on College Recruiter. He wanted to know how much better they would likely work on our site as compared to other job boards and he wanted us to provide to him actual data rather than just estimates. He was certainly asking a lot more of us than most of our potential clients but good for him. An informed client makes for a happy client.

The client had two main questions:

1. What is the average number of views per job? We attached to our emailed response an  example of a monthly job detail report that we emailed to an organization which is quite different from the client’s in terms of what they offer to their clients but quite similar in terms of how we envision working with the client. As you can see, in September we ran 1,370 jobs for the existing. Note that jobs were activated on virtually every day of the month and so the average job ran for only half of the month. We tracked and report 15,020 views for an average of 10.96 views per job. Given that the average job ran for half of the month, that equates to 21.93 views per job. (more…)

Posted September 29, 2016 by

Do you use vanity metrics to measure recruitment?

 

Do you know the difference between “vanity metrics” and “business metrics?” Many people assume they do, but oftentimes they don’t.

Vanity metrics are aspects of a business we track because the numbers are larger or more impressive, and it sounds better to present them to our bosses and other stakeholders.

Examples of vanity metrics  (more…)

Posted September 20, 2016 by

What’s the difference between diversity and inclusion?

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

Diversity is a complicated topic, especially in this modern political climate where it seems like many are trying to define other groups as the enemy. It’s also semantically complicated — it means many different things to many different people. Some think of it as skin color, some as gender, some along socioeconomic lines. It varies.

What’s more — diversity and inclusion are actually very different concepts, although they’re not often treated as such. Your efforts at diverse recruiting need to differentiate between the two ideas. (more…)

Posted September 17, 2016 by

You need effective talent, but can’t pay huge bucks for it. What now?

Ted Bauer

Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

As a smaller business, what you need is effective talent. That, coupled with strong decision-making and the right technological assets, will help you get competitive with your bigger in-industry rivals.

If you lack the talent, though, everything that comes next usually isn’t that successful. The problem, of course, is that traditional methods of getting talent — especially young talent, which (truth be told) can be gotten cheaper and developed — cost money. Doing on-campus college recruiting involves asset production, plane fares, hotel rooms, and other costs.

As a result, many companies — SMBs to enterprises like Goldman Sachs and Lockheed Martin — are shifting resources away from on-campus recruiting and into virtual/interactive recruiting. (more…)

Posted April 27, 2016 by

Benefits of using video and phone interviews in recruiting

Female boss talking with applicants online on video conference courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Photographee.eu/Shutterstock.com

While face-to-face interviews have not become obsolete, new interviewing methods are becoming more popular today. Video and phone interviews not only benefit job candidates but also benefit recruiters. Recruiters can save time and learn more about candidates to make the best hiring decisions. Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany, explains why video and phone interviews are effective in college recruiting.

“Video interviewing benefits both candidates and hiring managers. For an organization, pre-recorded screening questions create a consistent candidate experience by asking the same questions to applicants the same way. Candidates benefit because the technology is easily accessible and simple to use — just hit record.

Before in-person interviews, companies want to know the basics such as candidates’ skill sets, ambitions, what they can contribute to the company, etc. All of this valuable information is easy to gather through phone and video interviews.

The problem many organizations face when recruiting college students and recent graduates is a skills gap they possess and the skills needed to get the job done. While these interviews don’t fix the skills gap, they give recruiters a better understanding of the candidates. Recruiters can evaluate them more efficiently to avoid eliminating top talent who may not communicate their potential as clearly on their resumes, as they can when responding to specific questions. This affects the quality of hire, the most important measurement that tells employers how well their hiring teams recruit.

When using video interviews, recruiters are effectively finding high quality candidates and eliminating those who fall short. Additionally, they are reducing time to hire significantly and improving their return on investment (ROI).

We use our own talent management platform, which offers a video interviewing feature that seamlessly integrates candidates’ recorded responses with the applicant tracking system. This allows the entire hiring team to engage by watching the recordings at their convenience and collaborating by providing feedback through the platform.”

Do you want to learn more about phone and video interviews? Head to our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

Andre Lavoie is the CEO of ClearCompany, the first talent alignment platform that bridges the gap between talent management and business strategy by contextualizing employees’ work around a company’s vision and goals. You can connect with him and the ClearCompany team on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

Posted April 22, 2016 by

TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo: Doing better deals

The Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions (TATech) will host a fall conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, on September 19-21, 2016. Peter Weddle, CEO of TATech, is excited to announce the conference and share information about the conference’s scope, purpose, and agenda with viewers in this video hosted by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager of College Recruiter. Bethany interviews Peter and Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, who will present a session for talent acquisition leaders at the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Peter Weddle explains that TATech is the global trade association for the talent acquisition solutions industry. It represents the for-profit enterprises and not-for-profit organizations that provide technology-based products and services for talent acquisition professionals, from applicant tracking system companies, job boards, and social media sites to mobile apps, recruitment advertising agencies, and cloud-based recruitment marketing platforms. Collectively, its members power or operate over 60,000 sites worldwide and provide state-of-the-art solutions services for virtually every facet of talent acquisition.

The purpose of the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo is to provide cross-talk and information sharing between recruiters/talent acquisition professionals and vendors who provide products and services for talent acquisition professionals. Peter Weddle believes there is a lack of communication and interaction between these two groups of professionals, and that enabling employers and recruiters to get the information they need from their vendors will help them improve their return on investment.

Steven Rothberg, President of College Recruiter, hopes to help talent acquisition leaders improve their return on investment when working with vendors, too, and that is the scope of his presentation entitled, “Doing better deals: How to be a smart consumer of talent acquisition solutions.” In the past, many employers simply posted jobs and assumed the risk; either the jobs would perform well or not. However, with the solutions available to employers now via technology, employers should do their homework and understand the estimated return on investment associated with various types of advertising (banner advertising, email campaigns, pay per click, etc.).

Steven will cover this information in his presentation and believes it will empower talent acquisition professionals to make informed decisions regarding their college recruiting budgets. It will also help employers to negotiate better deals and to make cost comparisons between proposals from different vendors. He emphasizes that employers should negotiate with vendors and provide justification using metrics and pricing information using this type of cost comparison information.

Peter Weddle emphasizes the value of attending a conference like the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo; there isn’t always an opportunity to visit face-to-face with owners of organizations like College Recruiter. In addition, TATech is offering free hotel accommodations at The Palms to those who register for the conference by June 15, 2016. Lastly, Peter mentions that the conference is truly a fun experience, featuring the 2016 Recruiting Service Innovation Awards (the ReSIs). Modeled after the Oscars, the awards are a red carpet, black tie optional celebration.

Be sure to follow our blog for more information about upcoming conferences and events for recruiters and talent acquisition professionals. Subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

 

 

 

Posted March 31, 2016 by

College recruiting ROI

When considering return on investment (ROI) in college recruiting, it’s best to look beyond short-term measures and to consider long-term distal measures. Talent acquisition leaders must really look at the big picture; they can’t lose the vision of the forest for the trees.

This series of four videos, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, features The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadiou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

 


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

This series is one set of videos in a larger series featuring WPG experts posted on College Recruiter’s YouTube channel highlighting best practices and a timeline for developing a college recruitment program.

What are the best ways to determine the return on investment in college recruiting? Is it cost per hire? Recruitment cost ratio? Number of hires made? Retention of employees? Number of job offers to acceptances?

There are multiple factors to consider; ultimately, it comes back to “I spent a certain amount of money to achieve a certain result. So where did I start with college recruiting? Why did I start this in the beginning? Am I achieving what I set out to achieve?”

This brings recruiters back to their objectives. If objectives are big-picture oriented, recruiters will want to use distal measures when determining the effectiveness of their college recruiting programs, not just cost measures or efficiency measures based on the current calendar year.

In the next video, WPG experts share a powerful real example of determining the ROI of college recruiting.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

If you spent $5000 to hire a student from a particular university, and that hired individual made a great discovery which added value to your organization, you would probably agree that the $5000 individual was a better investment than many other individuals you hired who cost your college recruiting program much less.

Thus, return on investment is a broad concept which encompasses much more than ratios and efficiency measures. Recruiters should thoroughly examine their objectives for their college recruitment programs. It’s not just about short-term costs.

The third video discusses the importance of considering both efficiency and effectiveness when determining the ROI of college recruitment programs.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Efficiency is measured by short-term standards; it can be measured by ratios. How many resumes did I obtain from the university? How many candidates were interviewed? How many did we hire? Efficiency measures help recruiters determine whether to adjust the recruiting process or not.

When considering effectiveness, you’re finished with proximal data and are ready to look at distal data and long-term measures. Most HR and recruiting professionals lack patience when it comes to measuring effectiveness. However, sometimes waiting to monitor effectiveness is very important. Defining clear objectives on the front end is crucial, and deciding how to measure and track your objectives at the beginning is just as important. If you don’t, you will not wind up gathering reliable data.

The WorkPlace Group also features an article on its website entitled “Backwards is Forwards” with more information about the ROI of college recruiting.

The final video in this series provides recruiters with final tips related to measuring ROI in college recruiting.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

WPG experts recommend checking out The National Association for Colleges and Employers (NACE) website; it has some tools for assisting employers with measuring the effectiveness of their college recruiting programs.

As time goes on, employers learn that students who excel when hired are not the students they might have expected to excel. As time goes on, data provides expectations wrong. This is one reason it’s important to follow data and use it in the planning process. Study the data and measure long-term effectiveness (distal data). This will improve your college recruiting program and overall effectiveness.

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

Follow our blog and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

 

Posted July 03, 2013 by

Why Video? 6 Benefits of Making Video Part of Your Recruitment Mix

Mary Lorenz

Mary Lorenz of Careerbuilder

Not only is video a dominant form of communication; it is proven to be influential, as well.  Consumers are not just viewing content, but absorbing it, and letting themselves be swayed by it. When it comes to recruiting, potential and current employees are the customer, and the companies they choose to work for are the products they invest in. (more…)