• Job openings are more open to some than others: A guide for entry level job seekers to combat bias

    September 20, 2017 by

     

    With limited professional experience, it’s hard to know how to act when an employer is considering you for a role at their organization. We believe strongly in fair hiring practices. While employers can find plenty of advice for reducing bias in their hiring practices, job seekers should also be prepared to fight bias. Here we provide six tips for entry level job seekers who are nervous that their chances at job openings might be lower, due to bias against their gender, race, ethnicity, ability or other dimension of their identity.

    1. “They’ll see me for my skills, right?” Um, yes… But realize that bias exists.

    Continue Reading

  • 8 resume writing tips for that second job search out of college

    May 30, 2017 by

    If you’re in an entry-level job and want resume writing tips for your next job, read on.

    The resume format that you used for that first job out of college is going to vary greatly for your second job. It’s not about what you did in college anymore, it’s about what you did in that first job. More specifically – it’s about results, achievements, development, and growth. And directed specifically for each job.

    We asked several experts who weighed in with their resume writing tips: Continue Reading

  • Ready to climb the ladder in 2017? Here are 10 things recent college grads should do

    December 29, 2016 by

     

    No matter where one is at in their career, there are always things one can do to learn more, become more valuable, advance in their career, and become a go-to employer that people rely on.

    While you may not be where you want to be in your career now, it doesn’t mean you can’t get there in the future. One thing recent college graduates quickly find out is that, even though they finally secured that first job, there is still much work to be done to continue to advance in one’s career and climb the career ladder.

    So, what can you do in the next year to advance your career? Start by taking small steps that can lead to big improvements and changes. Do that by following these 10 things recent college grads should do to climb the career ladder in 2017:

    1. Find/consult with a mentor: Everyone could use a mentor – someone who can motivate, inspire and guide them in the early stages of their career. Find someone in your field, career path, or network who can be a mentor to you. Start by asking for an informational interview to learn more about their career. Then if you feel things are going in the right direction, explain your career goals and aspirations and ask if they would be interested in being a mentor. Many people would be flattered, and willing to help.
    2. Take a class: Even though you recently graduated from college, lifelong learning is essential to those who want to advance in their career. Take a class on Udemy or Coursera. Sign up for Lynda.com. Take an adult education class on a topic of interest, or register for a class – traditional or online – at a local college or university. Learning is lifelong, and getting in the habit of adding new skills throughout one’s career will pay off over time – in salary, and advancement opportunities.
    3. Do a social media audit: What does your online brand say about you? Google yourself – the next employer certainly will – what shows up? Review your social media profiles (LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, others) and check security settings and profiles and be sure they best represent you to an external audience. Seriously review comments, Tweets or photos and remove/edit anything that could hurt your professional reputation. For example, were you outspoken during the 2016 Presidential election, and perhaps commented, through Facebook, or on Twitter, about the Presidential race, Hillary Clinton, or Donald Trump? Those comments “live” in search engines, and others can find them. Don’t let social media comments, posts, pictures or shares damage your online brand.
    4. Consult with your campus career center: These people are here to help. Even after you graduate. Reach out to a campus career counselor for help with connecting to alumni, for job search assistance and resume writing guidance. Many people never take advantage of this opportunity. Why not reach out to a trained professional who can help?
    5. Complete a skills audit: Even if you aren’t looking for a job, search for jobs or job titles that may be of interest to you. What skills or requirements do these job applications ask for? Is there a skill (technology) or requirement lacking in your portfolio? In the year ahead, focus on how to develop or improve that skill, to become more attractive to an employer. Try and take on new projects at your current job, or find classes or training to help learn these important industry skills.
    6. Be a team player: You’re not going to be best friends with every co-worker. You’re not going to like every project or assignment. You may even sense conflict with other departments. But don’t mope, be difficult, or develop a bad attitude because of it. Why? Because someday that co-worker, manager, or person who seemed to be difficult on a project could work for a company where you want to work. What will they remember? Your negative attitude – if you let it. Be a team player at work, someone people go to for answers on projects, for assistance, and someone people can count on. Your co-workers will remember that, and will remember you if they are in a position to influence or assist you with your next job or step of your career.
    7. Update your resume: If that dream job opened up tomorrow would your resume be updated and ready for you to apply for the job? If that new networking contact asked for a resume to share with other industry contacts, would you be ready? Don’t delay. Updating your resume before you absolutely need it allows one to devote the time, attention and detail to perfect your resume. Even if you are completely happy in your career, updating one’s resume is a good way to help track new achievements and add any new skills to your resume. Better yet, updating a resume twice a year is ideal. At the end of each month write down your key successes and achievements, and at the six month mark, compile those accomplishments and update the resume. Then do it again at the end of year to make sure all is current and best represents the successes you have achieved at your job. If you don’t track it, you will forget it, and it won’t go on your resume, and your next employer will never know you did it.
    8. Attend an industry networking event: Attending networking events, or joining professional associations can open many doors. Make it a goal this year to attend at least one networking event or industry association event in your field in 2017. Why? Because networking always has been and always will be the key to climbing the career ladder.
    9. Create a backup plan: If you were fired or lost your job today, would you be ready tomorrow, both personally and professionally, for the challenge ahead? Figure out a way to save more money (perhaps through a part-time job?), be sure your resume is updated, and you would know what to do next, if suddenly without a job now.
    10. Be thankful: If you are employed, be thankful, even if you dislike the job, your manager, or career direction. Your current job, job title or situation doesn’t define you, or where you want to go. Keep adding new skills, taking on new projects, and learning. Because, the good news is, where you are now doesn’t mean it’s where you will be in six months, one year, three years and the rest of your career. Make 2017 a success by following the above tips and stay connected with College Recruiter to get job alerts, get career advice, and stay on top of trends and issues affecting both job seekers and employers.

    Follow these tips in 2017, and you could make great strides in your career development that will continue to have a positive effect not only next year, but in 2018, 2019 and throughout your career. Start now to succeed later.

    Want more career and job search advice? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

  • Back-to-school free resume critique

    August 26, 2016 by
    Resume writing tips written on notebook courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    kenary820/Shutterstock.com

    College and university students who are starting their fall semesters know that right after Labor Day the frenzy of on-campus recruiting begins. There’s a little bit of a breather from mid-November until the beginning of January and then the frenzy continues through March.

    When was the last time someone with training reviewed your resume and made specific recommendations to you for how it could be better? Are you missing keywords that employers will find when they’re searching a database? Is your language active instead of passive? Do you have specific accomplishments listed? Are your career goals spelled out clearly? Continue Reading

  • 5 resume writing tips for recent graduates

    April 09, 2016 by
    Resume writing tips written on notebook courtesy of Shutterstock.com

    kenary820/Shutterstock.com

    Irrespective of the profession, when it comes to finding a suitable job, candidates need well written resumes to present themselves as the most suitable candidates in front of prospective employers. The document provides brief information about education, skills, and prior work experience candidates may possess. It is equally important for job seekers without making any discrimination on the basis of education, skills, experiences, and the nature of the job. It is necessary for individuals searching for senior positions or entry-level vacancies.

    People have several misconceptions about resume writing, about including and excluding things, and formatting. Such misconceptions can be easily rectified after observing templates available on the web. But the real battle starts when new college graduates or individuals lacking the relevant job experience are writing resumes to brand themselves to employers. Nearly all new graduates start complaining that their resumes fail to create the right impression and are unable to help them to get a job interview call. 90% of the applicants think they are not being selected due to possessing zero or limited experience.

    Although education and level of expertise matters to get good jobs with high status and to some extent, it is also a requirement for entry-level jobs. Obviously, no one will hire job seekers with inadequate and irrelevant education. Recent graduates might be experiencing the same situation. Despite possessing the relevant education and internship experiences, if grads are experiencing the same situation, they will actually need to recheck their resumes to know what they are missing.

    Here are a few simple resume writing tips recent graduates have to keep in mind while creating their resumes to get internships or entry-level jobs in their relevant career fields.

    1. Start with your personal information

    Carefully, start by adding personal information like your full name, contact number, address, and an email address you check on a regular basis. Avoid misspelling these credentials, as they can be mistyped more frequently.

    2. Write an effective objective statement

    The career objective section is crucially important, and it should be added just after the contact credentials. In addition to placing it correctly, the objective must be very concise, covering the key components like the position you are applying for, the profession, and the most relevant skills. It enables your resume to stand out among the hundreds and thousands of resumes an employer might be sifting through.

    3. Sensibly add educational information

    Being recent graduates, the education section on their resumes is extremely important. Some candidates might not possess internship experience, and all they have are their degrees and certifications. Recruiters usually short-list candidates for entry-level and internship positions on the basis of their educational qualifications. Therefore, candidates must be very careful while adding and organizing educational information on their resumes. Start by adding the most recent degree and also mention the net GPA if it is three or more; don’t add the GPA if it is less than three. It’s better to mention the GPA of particular major if it is high enough. Don’t add unnecessary information about high school; instead, concentrate on current activities, work experiences, and accomplishments during college.

    4. Consider adding the link of your professional profile

    Although recent graduates are not classifying themselves into professional groups, they shouldn’t hesitate to create professional profiles on any of the suitable websites like LinkedIn. Grads are in the process of starting careers as professionals and should not underestimate themselves. Adding their professional profile links or portfolio links, in case they have made them during or after college, will portray a positive image of graduates’ personalities. It reveals they are eager to become professionals, and possess an innate love for specific career fields.

    5. Use action verbs over pronouns

    Don’t use first person or second person to describe yourself in a resume. Refrain using “I” or “me”. Also avoid using your name to talk about yourself in third person like “Anna is a fresh graduate” or “she is willing to join.” The best way to illustrate skills and accomplishments is using a few action verbs like created, developed, or managed under the heading of the department where someone might have worked. They give a natural tone to job seekers’ documents. Recruiters are well aware that candidates applying for entry-level jobs either don’t have work experience or that they lack the experience required to a vital job.

    After considering these simple tips and tricks, recent graduates will be able to write effective resumes to obtain desirable entry-level jobs according to their educational qualifications.

    For more resume writing tips to benefit your job search, check out College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

    Photo of Jenessa Baxter

    Jenessa Baxter, guest writer

    Author Bio: Jenessa Baxter is a Digital Marketer for Ultimate Recruitment Agency in Dubai. She writes about HR recruitment tips, leadership, HR management, and career consulting. Follow her on twitter @iamjenessabax

  • Top 20 Resume Writing Tips

    August 07, 2014 by
    Working on your resume

    Working on your resume. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

    The Internet is filled with tips and tricks on how to create a winning resume. Some articles explain what sort of language to use; others offer advice on what information to include and what to leave out. And along with each article come numerous samples of resumes, from simple and straightforward to ornamented and outlandish. Sometimes, the sheer amount of information available about resume writing can feel overwhelming. Here we offer a concise, effective list of the best tips for writing an interview-winning resume. Continue Reading

  • Recent College Graduates, Are You Keeping Track of Accomplishments on Your Jobs? Why It is a Good Idea

    June 20, 2014 by

    On their jobs, recent college graduates might want to consider keeping up with their career accomplishments.  Learn some reasons why in the following post.

    Every professional should keep an up-to-date list of his or her accomplishments, responsibilities and results. Academic advisors sometimes call this a “brag sheet,” and they draw from it when writing recommendations for students. Keeping a list of your professional accomplishments serves a similar purpose. This list acts as a repository that you can

    Continue reading here:

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  • Ability to Work in Team #1 Soft Skill Desired By Employers

    November 16, 2011 by

    What do employers look for in a resume? Beyond the candidate’s ability to meet standard criteria—the “right” major or work experience—employers are most likely to look for evidence that the candidate is able to work in a team, according to a new survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

    Nearly 80 percent of employers taking part in NACE’s Job Outlook 2012 survey said they search for evidence that the potential employee can work in a team, and more than three-quarters indicated they want the resume to show the candidate has leadership abilities and written communication skills. Evidence of problem-solving skills and a strong work ethic round out the top five “soft skills” employers seek on resumes. Continue Reading

  • Worst Resume Mistakes

    September 27, 2010 by

    With 14.9 million people unemployed in the U.S., according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the pressure to get resumes in the “yes” pile is immense. Nearly half (48 percent) of human resource managers surveyed reported they typically review 25 applications or less for open positions. Thirty-eight percent said, on average, they spend less than a minute reviewing a resume; 18 percent spend less than 30 seconds.

    One of the biggest mistakes job seekers make that can take them out of the running is a lack of customization. Seventy-nine percent of human resource managers said they pay more attention to resumes that are tailored to their open positions.

    When asked for the most memorable missteps they encountered when going through resumes, human resource managers and hiring managers reported the following:

    • Candidate put God down as a reference (no phone number).
    • Candidate listed her hobby as alligator watching.
    • Candidate claimed to be a direct descendant of the Vikings.
    • Candidate’s email address had “lovesbeer” in it.
    • Candidate listed “Master of Time and Universe” under his experience.
    • Candidate started off the application with “Do you want a tiger?”
    • Candidate specifically pointed out that he was not a gypsy.
    • Candidate’s condition for accepting the position was being allowed to bring his pet monkey to the workplace.
    • Candidate pointed out, “I’ll have your job in five years.”
    • Candidate sent a 24-page resume for a 5-year career.
    • Candidate put a picture of her cat on top of her resume.
    • Candidate declared himself the LeBron James of table games.
    • Candidate sent a video trying to hypnotize the HR manager into hiring him.

    “While it’s important to stand out from the crowd, job seekers need to make sure their resumes catch hiring managers’ eyes for the right reasons,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. “Job seekers need to communicate their relevant experience and utilize keywords from the job posting, while customizing their resume for each and every position. Focus on what you can bring to the table right from the get go.”

    Haefner offers the following tips to get you started on your road to resume success:

    • Quantify your experience – Have you helped increase client business, made significant sales or increased team productivity? Make every effort possible to quantify these experiences so you can show employers how you’ve positively affected bottom lines in the past – and how you can hit the ground running at their organization.
    • Keep it professional – While it sometimes can be helpful to include personal achievements on your resume, leave off information that is too personal. Instead, focus on items that are business-related, such as volunteer work or membership in professional organizations. Also, make sure you leave emoticons, inappropriate e-mail addresses and cutesy fonts off your final product.
    • Make it easy to read – Avoid using large blocks of text. Use bullets to break up text and make it easy for hiring managers to zero in on important points. Avoid using ornate fonts that may cause formatting issues when sharing electronically.
  • Resume Writing Tips – Four that are Important and Often Overlooked

    June 01, 2010 by

    Writing your own resume is something to take to heart as your resume will be the single most important weapon in your job-getting arsenal and knowing some easy resume writing tips can help turn your resume into a lethal weapon that is all but guaranteed to get you wonderful results. Many people simply overlook the little things when it comes to their resumes, but it is the little things that often mean the difference between many resume views and your resume ending up in a dumpster.
    While proper structure and good keywords are always a must when you are constructing your resume you also need to remember these little and often overlooked tips:
    1. Proofread: When your resume is done and you feel as though it is where you want it to be you need to be sure to proof read it. Then you should proof read it again. Then give it to your friend and have them proof read it. The point is that you need to be sure that your resume is not littered with many little misspellings or grammatical errors as there is nothing that says, “Hey, I am careless and don’t check my work,” more than bad grammar.
    2. Don’t Over-Style: Using bullet points to emphasize a point in your resume and using bold to indicate a title are great ways to jazz up you resume. However, using all sorts of fancy fonts, different font colors, using bold too much, and using italics too much is a sure way to annoy a reader and have your resume thrown away quickly. Some style is good, but if you spend too much time on style you will end up with a confusing and agitating resume.
    3. Supply Contact Info: This sure seems like a no-brainier doesn’t it? The fact is that many people only put one form of contact on their resumes. If your resume really speaks to a potential employer then you want that potential employer to be able to reach you with the greatest of ease. You should include your address, your phone numbers with times that you can be reached at each number, and you should also include your e-mail address. The more ways and employer has to get a hold of you the better. If you are too hard to reach, then they may go on to the next applicant.
    4. Sound Professional: Avoid using slang like the plague. Just because you know what the cool phrase of the month is, doesn’t mean that a potential employer will. You should also be sure that your e-mail is professional sounding. If you have an e-mail that is [email protected] then how professional do you think you are going to come off? E-mail addresses are free with many different services so if you have an e-mail address that is unprofessional sounding then get one that sounds professional such as [email protected]
    Writing the perfect resume doesn’t have to be a challenge, you just have to be sure to look at everything; including the little things. By taking your time and following these easy resume writing tips you too can have a knock out resume that you will truly be proud of.