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10 unique side jobs to help pay student loan debt - rock climbing instructor

Posted February 16, 2017 by

10 unique side jobs that can help pay off student loan debt

 

Robin Rectenwald has a full-time job working for WordWrite Communications a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania public relations firm, that she absolutely loves. But that hasn’t stopped her from finding unique side jobs to help pay off her student loan debt. Rectenwald graduated from Duquesne University in 2012 with 20 different student loans and $100,000 in loan debt. Now, in 2017, she only has five loans left, and is quickly whittling down the amount she owes.

Before landing her first full-time job in 2012, Rectenwald worked part-time as a customer service representative at Gateway Clipper Fleet, a Pittsburgh sightseeing organization. She worked in the ticket and sales office, where she learned about marketing, sales and customer service – all valuable skills in her current role – and for any future opportunities. She worked for Gateway Clipper Fleet for four years, using that money to make extra payments towards her school loans. Rectenwald recently switched to a new part-time job as a customer care representative at ShowClix, a ticketing software company. For this job, she works from the comforts of her own home answering phones and responding to emails from customers looking to buy tickets to international events.

“Even though I’ve grown as a professional in the PR field and have had a number of promotions that increased my salary since starting out as an entry-level professional, I continue to work a part-time job because I’m trying to save as much money as possible,” says Rectenwald. “With this part-time income, I’ve been able to pay off several student loans and I’m currently using this extra money to pay tuition out-of-pocket for grad school.”

Rectenwald takes these part-time jobs seriously, and puts in maximum effort – something her managers have noticed. She was offered a full-time job in the marketing department at Gateway Clipper Fleet, and is writing a crisis communication plan for ShowClix as part of her grad school program.

“These part-time jobs have not only expanded my network and presented additional career opportunities, it has also given me a unique perspective on marketing and communication strategies.”

And it’s also helped her greatly reduce her student loan debt, and time it would take to pay the loans back.

That’s what Eric Hian-Cheong is also trying to accomplish. He works full-time for a public relations firm in McLean, Virginia, but also has two, unique part-time jobs. He makes $11 an hour as a part-time rock climbing instructor at a local fitness center, and also works as a second shooter/assistant to a local wedding photographer.

“Why limit yourself to just one other part-time job?” said Hian-Cheong.

He works up to 8 hours a weekend, and nets up to $400 a month as a rock climbing instructor – which is right around what he pays each month for his student loans. That job also provides a free gym membership – saving him another $95 a month in gym membership fees.

These jobs have helped Hian-Cheong improve his self-confidence, he says, and also provides an incredible social life outside of the 9-to-5 job.

“I have several friends whose social lives revolve around their 9-to-5, which can get a little unhealthy at times,” says Hian-Cheong.

It’s also helped him network and communicate with a wide variety, and diverse group of people, helping him develop communication, interpersonal, critical thinking, and speaking skills, as he must provide instructions, detail, and clarity, when instructing individuals and a class.

Rectenwald and Hian-Cheong are among the many recent college grads supplementing their income, and paying off student debt with the help of a unique side job. What are some other unique part-time job opportunities one can pursue to help make extra cash to pay off student loans? Consider some of these options:

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Portrait of waiter holding menus in restaurant. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted February 14, 2017 by

Why employers covet soft skills developed working in the restaurant and retail industry

 

Note to those restaurant employees who get frustrated going to work on a Saturday night while friends are preparing for a night out on the town.

Employers understand the sacrifices you are making, and in the long run, it will pay off. Why?

Because employers covet recent college grads and entry-level job seekers who have restaurant industry experience. Sure, that doesn’t help when you feel you are missing the must-attend social event of the year (you’re really not) because you have to go to work, but it’s going to pay off when applying for that first job.

Same goes for that retail worker, who goes to class all day and closes up shop every night, or who has to pull a double shift on a Sunday when other workers call in sick (because they did go to that social event the night before).

Thousands of college students and recent college grads work restaurant jobs and retail jobs, and whether they know it or not, they are developing transferable skills that employees seek in recent college grads and entry-level job seekers.

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Posted August 11, 2006 by

Can Entry-Level Restaurant Jobs Be Any More Scrumptious?

All you creative cookers out there, or aspiring cookers, or those who just like to be around food, fret no more: with the simple click of a button and some spare time you can make all your dreams come true. Those entry-level restaurant jobs you’ve been salivating over are ready, or is it ripe, for the taking. I want to introduce you to a superb site that has everything you need to get the foot-in-the-door and it’s called Hcareers. It provides all anyone ever needs to find restaurant jobs, retail jobs, and hospitality jobs. Just click on the appropriate link (restaurant jobs) and then an entire list of restaurants pops up, you can click on one icon to find out more about the company and where the employment opportunities are located. If you change your mind and decide that food is not for you, you still have two other links to peruse—what is better than that? For the inclined person, create a member profile, post your resume and be “the first to know” about job opportunities by getting information sent to your email address. Who doesn’t love that?
For those adventure lovers check out Hcareers in Canada, the UK and Ireland.
There is also hospitalityonline.com, foodservice.com/employment, hotelrestaurantjobs.com, finediningjobs.com, foodwork.com…as you can see the list is quite extensive. My personal favorites are hospitalityonline.com and foodwork.com as they seem to be the easiest to navigate, provide the most amount of information on the employers, and the specific jobs available, and even subcategories of fastfood, restaurant or kitchen jobs (foodwork.com).
In my opinion the more specific the better and the more extensive the search the more opportunities one will have access to. Both sites provide contact information for the companies and even salary estimates. Hospitalityonline.com is a bit more extensive in what the requirements and specifications are for jobs and adds a nice touch by including detailed specs on the company in question.
So go eat!