ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 08, 2016 by

Hiring managers value first impressions and referrals

Friendly woman in business formal outfit photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

When attending your next career networking event, remember that hiring managers are watching your every move from the moment you enter the door until the second they begin networking with another job seeker. You can separate yourself from the competition by making the right first impression with recruiters. In addition, you should tell potential employers if you know someone at the particular company or organization. Referrals improve your chances of getting a foot in the door because a current employee can vouch for you, which hiring managers will respect. Internal referrals—referrals made by employees working within the organization—are the best kind of referrals to obtain. Never pass up an opportunity to mention people you know who work for an organization, particularly if you have genuine relationships with those individuals. This isn’t name dropping; it’s networking.

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs, shares his opinions on networking to find jobs and how networking influences hiring managers.

“Networking is the best way to find a job no matter what industry you are in. Those of us in hiring positions are constantly receiving resumes from recruiters and job applicants, and it’s really impossible for us to sift through the good resumes from the bad ones. When either meeting someone personally who impresses us or getting introduced to someone through a trusted friend, we’re much more willing to look at a resume and contact the applicant, and we also have social pressure to do so.”

Find more networking tips on our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs

Eden Chen is the Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs, one of the fastest growing software development agencies in the US. Eden is a serial entrepreneur and heads up various other startups including Knife and Fox (design agency), Ctrl Collective (co-working), Glo Bible (app with 3 million+ downloads), Zolo Studios (game studio), and Dev Crew (international software development).

Posted June 30, 2016 by

Networking on college campuses builds relationships

Human resources photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Building a relationship with anyone requires time and effort. Once a relationship is established, both parties must work to maintain it. If recruiters and hiring managers want to really connect with college students, they should consider showing up on college campuses. These are networking opportunities not only for students but also for employers. Employers can create connections by personally interacting with college students, answering their questions, or by handing out business cards or other company information. Recruiters and hiring managers who spend time and energy on college campuses can not only network with students but also potentially build long-term relationships with schools. Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific, shares his thoughts on the importance of recruiters attending networking events on college campuses.

“It’s important for organizations with ongoing hiring needs at the college degree level to build and maintain excellent working relationships with their target institutions. Many times, it takes a year or two for given organizations to begin building strong brand reputations at colleges and universities that will attract the top caliber talent they (and other employers) desire.

Creating good recruiting relationships means you want college students talking to and talking up your organization to other students. Nothing is more powerful than trusted friends making a referral based on their own first-hand experience. Approved sponsorship opportunities with key student groups can also help cultivate student recognition of your organization.

Developing a strong partnership with the college’s career services operation is probably the most important thing an organization can do. Doing so can open all kinds of opportunities to engage students and even faculty potentially. In my 20 plus years doing this, I have seen time and again those employers who commit to long-term relationships with schools (i.e., don’t abandon the relationship even when employers are not hiring or there may be a market downturn) will be the most successful.”

Learn more on the importance of networking on the College Recruiter blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific

Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific

Tom Vecchione is the Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific. Tom earned a Ph.D. in Counseling from Ohio University, specializing in college student career development. Tom has 22 years of progressively, responsible experience in career services/placement and university student affairs and works extensively with employers seeking to hire college students or alumni.

Posted September 02, 2014 by

Are You a Recent Graduate Searching Jobs? Don’t be These Kinds of Job Seekers

If you’re a recent graduate searching jobs, make sure you don’t hurt your chances by becoming any of these job seekers shown from an infographic in the following post.

Job searching is difficult at best. And the longer we’re looking for work, the more frustrated – and perhaps desperate – we become. We can rationalize asking before giving. We start talking in cliches instead of clearly stating our value proposition. And somehow, the bad kind of stalking becomes okay…

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Posted August 11, 2014 by

College Graduates, Ask These 4 Questions Before Sending Out Resumes for Jobs

Before submitting resumes for jobs, college graduates should ask themselves these four questions in the following post.

A job seeker reports applying for over 1,000 jobs in the past 12 months. The results: Zero job offers; zero job interviews. Like many job seekers, this job seeker viewed the millions of job postings on the Internet as the path to employment. The problem: Too many applications done quickly, carelessly and without conviction…

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Posted July 30, 2014 by

5 Reasons Why Internships and Co-ops Are Essential!

Intern organizing shelves in supermarket under supervision of store manager

Intern organizing shelves in supermarket under supervision of store manager. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

If you’re a student, you might be looking into part-time jobs to make some money during the school year, or maybe a full-time job for the summer. While making money to help pay for school sounds like a good idea, it might end up costing you money in the long term.

The reason is simple: it’s getting harder and harder for university and college graduates to find a full-time job in their career path once they graduate—especially for those who do not have any practical work experience. It has become incredibly valuable for students to take co-ops during the school year and internships in the summer.

Here’s why. (more…)

Posted July 30, 2014 by

Want to Use LinkedIn as an Advantage to Find an Internship or a Job? 7 Steps You Can Take

For those of you trying to find an internship or a job on LinkedIn, the following post has seven steps you can take to use the site to your advantage.

Many college students, recent graduates and young professional are starting to see the power of LinkedIn. However, the one thing they learn very quickly is that they don’t yet have the quantity or quality of contacts necessary to leverage the world’s largest professional network. The best of them, however, don’t let that stop them from using

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Posted July 29, 2014 by

Recent College Graduates, Are You Stuck in Your Searches for Jobs? 6 Ways to Move them Forward

Recent college graduates who believe their searches for jobs are getting nowhere can get them going again in these six ways found in the following post.

There are many things that can trip you up in the job search. They’ll cause you to get frustrated, lose heart, and maybe want to give up. But most are avoidable if you put some forethought and planning into the process.

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Posted July 15, 2014 by

Entry Level Job Seekers, Need to Build a Personal Brand? 30 Tips to Achieve this Goal

A personal brand can help entry level job seekers stand out to employers.  In the following post, learn 30 tips for building your brand.

For the young careerist fighting the economy, stiff competition, and a bit of self-doubt, presenting a strong personal brand is a must. Done well, your brand becomes a huge asset to your career. Done poorly, or wrapped in a cloud of me-too sameness, your brand becomes yet another obstacle

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Posted June 06, 2014 by

Is Your Entry Level Job Search Ready for a Test Run?

In order for a potential employer to buy into you as a candidate for an entry level job, you must show them what you have to offer.  Find out how in the following post.

Would you buy a car based only on what the sticker says? On what the salesperson tells you? No, you wouldn’t! While relying on your experience to guide your decision, you would take into consideration every single thing that’s important to you before you made an offer. For recruiters trying to find

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Posted May 28, 2014 by

Networking in Person to Learn about Jobs for College Students? Don’t Commit These 7 Sins

If you’re networking face to face to learn more about jobs for college students, make sure not to commit these seven sins found in the following post.

In some circles networking has a bad reputation. In part, this is because of a few bad networking apples who spoil it for everyone else. As someone who has attended (and hosted) thousands of networking meetings and events — and is often referred to as a ‘master networker’ – I’m going to let you in on a few

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