•  When talent acquisition ends in salary negotiation: Tips for recruiters

    September 18, 2017 by

     

    If your employer is like the vast majority, you try to keep your candidates in the dark about salary range until you’re ready to discuss it.  This is a disservice to both you and the candidate, so we are providing tips for talent acquisition leaders and their recruiting teams to prepare proactively for these conversations with candidates.

     Common mistakes recruiters make while negotiating salary 

    1. The biggest mistake is to pretend that candidates are in the dark about what your company can offer. Candidates now have tools that facilitate their research into what is a competitive salary, and where your organization lies in the range. In addition to using resources like their college career center or networking with alumni, they can find a number of salary calculators online, not to mention glassdoor’s databank of companies and average salaries for individual job titles. Entry level candidates are familiar with these tools and they use them. Any talent acquisition team that thinks they’re the ones holding the cards, is mistaken.
    2. “Using a ‘take it or leave it’ approach with a candidate that you want to hire,” according to August Nielsen, HR Director at Veterans United. “This is hardly ever a great strategy for long-term success.  This approach really sets the tone for the rest of the candidate and employee experience, and everything the candidate experiences from that point forward is seen through that lens. The lesson learned here is that a ‘take it or leave it’ approach isn’t going to plant those seeds of success, trust, and genuine care of employees that drive the best talent to your doors. The best recruiters know how to establish and maintain trust and credibility for both parties.
    3. Not including a salary range in the job description. The vast majority of job postings currently do not include a salary range, so you might think you can blend into the crowd. However, things will start to change quickly because of how Google for Jobs has decided to rank search results. Google deems salary range to be an important factor for job seekers as they search online. This is logical. Google wants to provide job seekers with search results that give them exactly what they’re looking for. So if job postings with salaries listed make job seekers happy, Google prefers those job postings in the list of search results. When Google ranks your job postings so low that job seekers won’t even find them, you will be swimming upstream to attract many quality candidates.

    Also read our tips for job seekers to negotiate salary and benefits

    Talent acquisition is more than bringing people through the door. How to advocate for a more expensive candidate:

    An expensive candidate may be worth itIf you want to hire a top candidate who is negotiating for a higher salary, first and foremost, says Nielsen, “a recruiter needs to know their candidate’s and company’s needs. No candidate is perfect, but if every box about their experience and suitability for the company is ‘checked,’ leaving only the salary box unchecked, then those are starting points for discussions for both ends.”

    Calculating the ROI of hiring a more expensive candidate should include additional intangible benefits too. For example, if your organization is struggling to change its culture or has other human resource challenges, and your top candidate can offer the character or attitude that can help move the needle, this is worth something. Talent acquisition is much more than bringing people through the door. It is about aligning talent with business strategies.

    Related: Looking beyond your top schools and majors can help bring the culture change you’ve been wishing for

    More often than not, says Nielsen, a candidate whose “salary requirements are a bit higher than others, but clearly fits the company’s needs regarding culture, skills and abilities, it’s undoubtedly well worth the extra money.” If you have done the hard work of vetting candidates and present the best ones, then “this should be an easy sell.”

    Remember that you have the same tools that candidates available to them to research salaries. In addition, recruiters at most larger companies will also have access to various salary survey data. “This data is important,” says Nielsen, “but the greatest tool is knowing your candidate’s value and the boundaries you must establish during the negotiation to make the salary fair for both parties. A candidate that senses you have the capacity to pay more but are choosing to be greedy” could turn the negotiation into a declined offer.


    PONDER THIS: College Recruiter has delivered thousands of email campaigns to millions of students and grads. We typically see an open rate and click-through rate that is twice that of our competitors. Would it make sense to learn how our expertise can drive more candidates to your career site?


    How recruiters can maintain professionalism and negotiating power in front of the candidates

    Recruiters can maintain negotiating powerRecruiters often do not have the authority to make budget decisions, but having to carry the negotiation back and forth with a superior can demean your authority and empower the candidate to stand their ground.

    Recruiters can address this by making sure that they always build a relationship with the candidate during the entire hiring process. “If there is mutual respect,” says Nielsen, “and a personable, genuine channel of communication between both parties, then the right things to say will reveal themselves naturally. Remember that the candidate is likely nervous about the conversation. As a recruiter, you know a fair salary, so be firm and be fair, and truly try to work with your candidate’s needs.”

  • Upskilling talent and 5 reasons to look past your top schools and majors

    September 01, 2017 by

     

    If recruiters aren’t looking beyond their annual list of campuses, or looking beyond the traditional 4-year graduate, or expanding the short list of majors they actively seek, they could be sinking their own ship.

    I am not the first one to point this out. LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner says their emphasis moving forward is on “skills, not degrees.” Here are five reasons why talent acquisition professionals need to look beyond their list of top schools and major. Continue Reading

  • Tips from expert recruiters: the best elevator pitch and how much time to spend networking

    August 28, 2017 by

     

    Networking is part of the job search, like it or not. For entry level job seekers, it’s important to practice a simple introduction that lets people know who you are and who you want to be, so they know how to help you. I met with two recruiting experts who gave their advice for the best elevator pitch, and plenty more tips for students and grads to network and build their personal brand.

    Toni Newborn, J.D., is the Diversity and Consulting Services Manager at the City of Saint Paul; and Jeff Dunn is the Campus Relations Manager at Intel. Newborn and Dunn are part of College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts. Continue Reading

  • Resume rules: Avoid common mistakes and stand out [video]

    March 31, 2017 by

     

    College Recruiter spoke with Joanne Meehl, President and primary Job Coach & Career Consultant at Joanne Meehl Career Services.  Joanne is part of College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts, which is made up of professionals around the country with top notch advice for recruiters and HR professionals, or for entry level job seekers. Here, Joanne shares her insight into resume rules that help college students and grads avoid mistakes and stand out to the applicant tracking systems. Continue Reading

  • Assumptions that hurt hiring practices

    February 24, 2017 by

     

    Hiring assumptions are everywhere. They often reduce the effectiveness of the hiring process. Admittedly, it’s impossible to remove all potential subjectivity and bias from a hiring process. Even as we’ve introduced more technology into recruiting (for example, Applicant Tracking Systems), a human being–a flawed human being–makes the final decision after some person-to-person meetings. A candidate’s dress, speech, overall manner, specific responses to questions, and more can potentially trigger biases and assumptions in even the most level-headed hiring manager. Confirmation bias is hugely powerful psychologically, and we can’t ignore that.

    However, let’s call out some of the biggest hiring assumptions. Perhaps increased awareness can help us to be more vigilant, and minimize the impact of our biases on recruiting and hiring. Some of the most common hiring assumptions include:

    Assumption #1: “The perfect candidate is always out there somewhere!” This is an ideal, but often not the reality. To find the best candidate for a given job, a hiring manager/HR professional needs to understand three different concepts: (1) the work itself, (2) the current composition of the job market for that type of role, and (3) what other jobs in that geography (or remote) are offering. Internally at companies, HR and hiring managers tend to understand (1), but less so (2) and (3). If you need an “agile scrum manager,” and your local market just hired dozens of that role, then when you go to hire, it’s a depleted market. The perfect candidate may not be out there, and it may be better to delay the posting instead of hiring someone short of your needs because of this hiring assumption.

    Assumption #2: Complicated hiring processes weed out less passionate candidates: Many times, companies will create intense early-stage (top of funnel) hiring processes. For example, their candidates must take written tests, complete projects, etc. The theory is logical: having these as mandatory will weed out less-passionate “passive” candidates. Unfortunately, though, this is also a hiring assumption that can backfires. Intensive, jump-through-hoops hiring demands can end up just being barriers, and weed out highly-qualified people, who may simply choose not to apply. Additionally: if your hiring process is very demanding, that might be fine. But please make sure it correlates with competitive compensation at the end. No one wants to prove a skill set 17 times over to then be offered an under-market salary. Continue Reading

  • College Recruiting Bootcamp: featuring Teresa Green

    November 09, 2016 by

    teresa-green head of global talent acquisitionWho is Teresa Green?

    Head of Global Talent Acquisition, CEB

    What you’ll hear from Teresa at the Bootcamp:

    How to use metrics to improve return on investment from college relations program

    Why you’d be wise to listen to Teresa’s advice:

    Teresa is responsible for leading a best in class, global talent acquisition function for CEB, a global best practice insight and technology company.  She leads a team of 40 amazing talent acquisition experts. She’s responsible for setting the strategic direction and development of the function while effectively managing the expectations of and relationships with CEB’s global client community. Teresa develops the strategies which deliver a continuous, viable, and quality pipeline of talent to CEB’s business while scaling the function to meet its needs as a growing global company. She’s also responsible for creating a stronger employment brand in the market to attract top-decile talent around the world.

    Her specialties are Recruitment Strategies, In House Recruitment, Executive Search, Human Resources, Consulting, Professional services


    The College Recruiting Bootcamp will be focused, fast and mentally challenging. Join us in D.C. on December 8, 2016 at the SEC headquarters. Reserve your space today!

  • College Recruiting Bootcamp: featuring Kamille Smith

    by

    kamille-smith at U.S. Office of Personnel ManagementWho is Kamille Smith?

    Program Analyst, U.S. Office of Personnel Management

    What you’ll hear from Kamille at the Bootcamp:

    How to convert interns into permanent, full-time employees upon graduation

    Why you’d be wise to listen to Kamille’s advice:

    Kamille has about 10 years of experience in the Federal Government. She currently serves as a Program Analyst with the Recruitment Policy and Outreach, Pathways Programs for Students and Recent Graduates, at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. She provides training, technical guidance and support to the agencies’ Pathways Programs Officers and job seekers. She also played a vital role in OPM’s work on the Pathways Programs agency-wide Toolkit and Handbook for supervisors and managers.

    The College Recruiting Bootcamp will be focused, fast and mentally challenging. Join us in D.C. on December 8, 2016 at the SEC headquarters. Reserve your space today!

  • Oven-ready hires: The problem of matching available skills to our demands

    October 28, 2016 by

    Oven ready dishGuest writer Martin Edmondson, CEO and founder of Gradcore

    It feels like there is an ever-growing consensus among employers that university graduates should emerge fully formed, perfectly skilled and immediately work ready. The phrase ‘oven ready’ graduates appears far too often for my liking. It oversimplifies what is ultimately a very complicated issue: How do you match the supply of skills and people with the demands of the economy, when both are moving targets? In other words, how much should employers compromise when searching for the ideal candidate? How much should they training should they assume?

     

    This is such a significant issue in the UK that the government has created a ‘Teaching Excellence Framework’ for universities. One of its goals is to tackle “skill mismatches” in the economy. (Go figure that the same government is now limiting their own access to skilled talent via immigration clampdowns.)

    Every employer presents unique circumstances. So it’s critical for employers to examine their fundamental approach to hiring with a few questions such as:

    • What characterizes the hires you make that are successful, and those that are not?
    • What is the most critical factor for fit with your organization – skills, values, attitude etc?
    • How recently did you evaluate what is really important in the people you hire?
    • If all the evidence says that those people are not available for that price in this place, which one of those variables are you prepared to change?

    Here is the challenge: So many employers are seeking candidates with the skills that are in shortage areas. This is typically around digital and software roles where there is a major disconnect between employer requirements and the quality and quantity of graduates available. Employers (and policy makers who are trying to solve these problems) should try one of the following:

    1. Grow your own

    This is the long game, but often one of the most successful approaches if you have the time. Recruit graduates who have the core attributes or values that suit your organisation, but need to develop their skills further. Then put in place the structured training that will develop them. This could be in house training, or delivered under emerging models such as degree-apprenticeships.

    2. Think differently

    Stop looking at the really obvious candidates. This could be described as the Blue Ocean approach, getting away from where everyone else is fishing. Recently I saw a very interesting post from a company called Talla about mapping resumes using neural networks. This visual approach helps you to appreciate that people who superficially have seemingly different backgrounds are actually remarkably similar. Each of the dots below is a resume. This shows how different titles share characteristics:Point graph of title descriptions on resumes

     

     

     

     

     

    3. Up the budget

    Sometimes you simply need to either increase the budget in order to reach a wider audience, or increase salary to attract the necessary skills. While it’s never ideal, there are clearly certain economic realities that are hard to escape.

    Underlying all of this is a bigger societal question, which will be answered differently in different countries:

    Whose job is it to make a person employable?

    Is it the role of the education system and teachers? Employers? Parents or the state? Or are we all solely responsible for our own development? All play a part, but the prevailing national answer to this question goes a long way to deciding the expectations employers have of graduates and vice versa.

     

    Look forward to discussing this and lots of other topics around college recruiting at the College Recruiter Bootcamp in Washington DC on December 8.

    martin-edmondsonMartin is the CEO and founder of Gradcore, a social enterprise focused on graduate employment and employability. Martin has more than 15 years of experience in graduate recruitment and Higher Education. He founded Gradcore, and over the last decade has led a wide range of graduate recruitment and employability projects. These include running global graduate schemes for a range of large employers, delivering employability performance improvement in universities, and chairing the UK and European Graduate Employment Conferences. Martin was a member of the steering group for the ‘graduate recruitment in SMEs’ report for the UK government and has written for a wide range of newspapers and websites. Connect with Martin on LinkedIn.

  • Preparing for a career in the STEM Industries

    October 06, 2016 by

    Guest writer Luciana Amaro, Vice President Talent Development & Strategy, BASF

    1272644The workforce in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, or STEM, is crucial to America’s innovative capacity and global competitiveness. Today’s STEM graduates have more career opportunities available now than at any other time in U.S. history. This three-part series from BASF, the world’s leading chemical company, will examine ways that college students and new graduates can establish a strong foundation that equips them to join the next generation of scientists and engineers.

    STEM disciplines have increasingly experienced talent shortages over the years. Recent data show that for every 1.9 available STEM jobs, there is only one qualified STEM professional available for hire. The resulting impact on the global economy is striking, given how many industries are part of the STEM supply chain. In fact, according to a recent report by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), by 2018, there could be 2.4 million unfilled STEM jobs.

    If you are considering a career in any of the STEM disciplines, do you know which education path will best prepare you? There are many programs at four-year universities, two-year colleges, community colleges, junior colleges and vocational-technical colleges. With so many choices, it might be overwhelming to determine what’s right for you, but the good news is that you can establish a strong foundation for success through many different ways.

    Build a strong foundation

    While we always appreciate an advanced degree, at BASF we also seek candidates who have non-traditional backgrounds that offer a transferable, yet distinct, set of skills and abilities, such as active or former military personnel. We believe hiring diverse employees results in an engaged, high-performing workforce that drives long-term success. If you are pursuing a technical career, junior colleges and certificate programs can provide you with the trade skills many companies require.

    Expand your network

    There are many collaborative educational partnerships that exist between businesses and schools today. See if your school offers education tracks or career fairs to set you up with connections following graduation. Most STEM related companies interview and hire students before they graduate, working closely with colleges to get a jump on the competition.

    Some companies, including BASF, recruit high-potential candidates through internship programs. Internships are a great way to build first-hand experience, gain practical insights into a particular company and larger industry, and help you apply the skills you learned in school. While possessing strong science and math skills might seem obvious, young professionals in the STEM fields also need well-developed interpersonal skills, as well as presentation, public speaking, organizational skills and great attention to detail.

    After college, what’s next? For advice on the myriad career opportunities in STEM available to new graduates today, check back next Thursday to read “Exploring STEM Career Opportunities for Young Professionals.”

    luciana-amaroLuciana Amaro is a Vice President in BASF Corporation’s Human Resources department, leading the Talent Development and Strategy unit.  In her current role, which she assumed on August 1, 2014, she is responsible for North American talent management, leadership development, staffing and university relations, workforce planning, learning and development, organizational development and change management.

  • Are you wasting millions on your on-campus recruiting approach? It’s possible.

    September 21, 2016 by
    Ted Bauer

    Ted Bauer is a contributing author to College Recruiter

    By Ted Bauer, contributing author to College Recruiter

    This headline from October 2015 in Harvard Business Review says it all: “Firms are wasting millions recruiting on only a few college campuses.”

    We’ve seen this for years, especially among the EPS companies across investment banks, management consulting firms, and law firms. There are “target” campuses and then there’s “everyone else.” While you might get some amazingly high-quality people (good!), overall the process has a lot of waste, financially and in terms of potential burnout for your recruiting team.

    There’s a better way. Ever seen the stat that it took 35 years to construct the federal highway system, but Facebook reached 500 million users in six years? It’s an obvious stat, sure — but it speaks to the amazing power of digital to both connect and scale.

    No matter how you approach digital vs. in-person, your goal should be to maximize your ROI from your college recruiting efforts. To do that, you might need to move around some budget buckets: less on-campus and more interactive/digital/social/job board work.