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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted June 30, 2016 by

Networking on college campuses builds relationships

Human resources photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Building a relationship with anyone requires time and effort. Once a relationship is established, both parties must work to maintain it. If recruiters and hiring managers want to really connect with college students, they should consider showing up on college campuses. These are networking opportunities not only for students but also for employers. Employers can create connections by personally interacting with college students, answering their questions, or by handing out business cards or other company information. Recruiters and hiring managers who spend time and energy on college campuses can not only network with students but also potentially build long-term relationships with schools. Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific, shares his thoughts on the importance of recruiters attending networking events on college campuses.

“It’s important for organizations with ongoing hiring needs at the college degree level to build and maintain excellent working relationships with their target institutions. Many times, it takes a year or two for given organizations to begin building strong brand reputations at colleges and universities that will attract the top caliber talent they (and other employers) desire.

Creating good recruiting relationships means you want college students talking to and talking up your organization to other students. Nothing is more powerful than trusted friends making a referral based on their own first-hand experience. Approved sponsorship opportunities with key student groups can also help cultivate student recognition of your organization.

Developing a strong partnership with the college’s career services operation is probably the most important thing an organization can do. Doing so can open all kinds of opportunities to engage students and even faculty potentially. In my 20 plus years doing this, I have seen time and again those employers who commit to long-term relationships with schools (i.e., don’t abandon the relationship even when employers are not hiring or there may be a market downturn) will be the most successful.”

Learn more on the importance of networking on the College Recruiter blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific

Tom Vecchione, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific

Tom Vecchione is the Assistant Vice President and Executive Director for Career Development at University of the Pacific. Tom earned a Ph.D. in Counseling from Ohio University, specializing in college student career development. Tom has 22 years of progressively, responsible experience in career services/placement and university student affairs and works extensively with employers seeking to hire college students or alumni.

Posted June 06, 2016 by

Why employees should put extra effort into impressing the boss

Woman raising her hand to ask question photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

At the very beginning of your career, you may be faced with the fact that all the knowledge and the diplomas in the world will not be enough to save you if you are on your boss’s bad side. You will end up watching from your cubicle how other people are getting promoted, while you are sitting there and doing the same things you have done on your first day at work.

You see, when people graduate they are full of confidence and hope, and that is not a bad thing, but books and tests are just the basics that should be upgraded with experience and interpersonal relationships. One of the people who can affect your professional growth the most is your boss, and you should do your best to make that relationship productive and mutually beneficial.

Learning from your boss

One of the main reasons why you should have a good relationship your boss is the opportunity to learn from someone who is in a position you would love to be in the future. If you are constantly giving your maximum with work tasks and showing consistency and dedication, you will have the right to participate in some important conversations and find out many valuable things, not only about the company you are working in, but also about the road to success.

Self-improving

At first, your motivation may be just to impress your boss, but as time goes on, your dedication and efforts will grow to become habits and make your career success even more certain. Showing up to work early and taking initiative might seem like “sucking up” to your boss to other employees and to you yourself, but actually, when you think about it, there is nothing wrong with these actions. On the contrary, they showcase you as a well-educated and ambitious man/woman.

You are the image of your boss

… and vice versa. A good boss surrounds himself with competent people, and if you show to be anything other but that, you will not only make your boss look bad, but also create a negative image about yourself, which can impact your position in the firm, and even future employment opportunities. If you on the other hand, do your best to make your boss succeed, you will show that you are a great employee worthy of going up the corporate ladder.

Improving your current job

If you want to love the job you are doing, you have to make it a job you can love. The best, and possibly the only way to do so, is to make your boss fond of you. If you are consistently productive and assigning for the difficult tasks, you will have a more pleasant relationship with your boss, which will make your working hours less stressful. Beyond that, you will get better assignments and maybe become the right-hand-man/woman.

Getting promoted

The ultimate goal of every employee would never even be considered without a long process of impressing the boss. After all, your boss is the one handling the decisions about transfer of the employees to a better job. If you notice he is giving you some extra projects and work, accept it with enthusiasm, because this can be a part of grooming you for higher jobs, and eventually even his position. So, make sure you are on his radar by struggling to get new challenges and more recognition, instead of struggling to get your work done.

Some people would love to spend their days at work unnoticed to avoid conflicts and critiques, but by doing so, they are also avoiding praises and opportunities. Do not be one of those people and fight your way up to the top, in a struggle where impressing your boss is your best chance to succeed.

In search of more career advice? Come to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Nate Vickery, guest writer

Nate Vickery, guest writer

Nate Vickery is a marketing manager and a blogger. He is also the editor-in-chief at BizzMarkBlog.

Posted October 08, 2014 by

7 Simple Ways To Make Employees Love Their Jobs

Group of hardware store workers giving thumbs up

Group of hardware store workers giving thumbs up. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Contrary to popular opinion, employees are not necessarily motivated by position, power, or prosperity. Instead, the highest order of incentives come from raising employee self-esteem and offering work that stimulates a sense of self-actualization. In many businesses, office problems arise because of a high turnover rate due to front-line managers and supervisors not being aware of how to provide employees with meaningful work incentives. Proprietary office staffing offers the the ability to strategically recruit employees at all levels of management. (more…)

Posted September 09, 2014 by

College Students, Building a Personal Brand as You Search for Jobs? Your A-Z Guide for Success

College students searching for jobs who need some help building a personal brand can find an A to Z guide from an infographic in the following post.

Five years ago, almost no one talked about personal branding. Today, you apparently can’t build a career without a first building a brand of your own. But how do you get started? What makes for a solid personal brand? And exactly how do you a build a brand that leads to an impeccable

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Posted September 04, 2014 by

Looking for a Career Boosting Entry Level Job? 5 Reasons to Consider Employment at a Startup

Getting an entry level job at a small company can give you the chance to boost your career.  In the following post, learn five reasons to work for a startup.

Many graduates dream of landing a great entry-level job with a big company. A large company can often offers new grads the opportunity to handle multiple roles and get a headstart for developing a well-rounded career. For a time, global banks and big consulting firms were the most sought-after employers

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Posted July 31, 2014 by

College Graduates, Have You Been Hired for Jobs? Life Lessons to Embrace in the Workplace

Once college graduates are hired for jobs, there are some life lessons they should learn for the workplace.  Find out what these lessons are in the following post.

Post by Vicky Oliver Millennials, or people born between 1983 and 1999, are a talented generation of workers, bringing with them new skills to the workplace. And while this generation has been studied a lot, not all studies concur on their conclusions. Are our youngest employees more socially conscious than previous generations? More into life balance? Sometimes it

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Posted July 02, 2014 by

Young Professionals, Not Feeling the Love on Your Entry Level Jobs? How You Can Survive

For young professionals working hard on their entry level jobs and not feeling appreciated, the following post has some survival tips for the workplace.

Have you ever felt like you were being taken advantage of at work? Well, welcome to corporate America. Unless you work at a notoriously employee-friendly company such as Google or Zappos, you need to accept that the company you work for may be more interested in the bottom line than your happiness. In an ideal

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Posted July 02, 2014 by

Think You’ve Found Your Dream Entry Level Job? 10 Signs that Prove You Right

Let’s say that during your entry level job search, you find an opportunity that you believe is perfect for you.  How will you know if it is?  In the following post, learn 10 signs that prove you have found your dream job.

Many dream of landing the perfect job. But do we really know what that means? Is it a specific company? The size of the company, or the location? Successful work-life integration? Four-day work weeks? Maybe a casual dress-code and Friday happy hours? Surprisingly enough, ultimately our vision of a

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Posted June 24, 2014 by

Help Your Gen-Y Traits Stand Out Among Job Seekers

The things that matter to today’s graduates when it comes to finding workplace happiness are a bit different than that of generations past. In fact, when comparing Gen-X (born during the mid 1960s through the late 1970s) to Gen-Y (born early 80s to early 2000s), there are a number of factors that make them very distinct kinds of employees.

While Generation X is known for its entrepreneurial nature, confidence, and self-motivation, Generation Y is more technologically savvy, can multitask with ease, and isn’t afraid to take risks. As a member of Gen-Y, you’ll want to learn how to play up those attributes to employers so that they are perceived as strengths. For instance, it’s typical for more recent graduates to prefer a workplace that provides staff members with a lot of feedback, has team-building exercises, and gives recognition for a job well done. (more…)

Posted May 20, 2014 by

5 Qualities of Top-Tier Bosses

Ken Sundheim

Ken Sundheim, Chief Executive Officer at KAS Placement

The best bosses are the ones who can turn a good organization into a great company.  They are the individuals who consistently push their employees to become better, more engaged and enable them to adapt to oncoming changes in the corporate landscape.

Instead of suppressing employees, top-tier bosses encourage smart ideas, open conversation and creativity.  They reward the employees who deserve recognition instead of promoting those who simply agree with them.

Regardless of industry or size of company, studies have showed that the best bosses share common traits that lead to consistent success.  Below, you’ll find 5 of them. (more…)