ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted January 19, 2017 by

It’s crucial for managers to learn to communicate across generations

 

The first thing one needs to realize once they move to a management role is this:

Your job has changed! Drastically.

Many people happily take on the title of ‘manager’ while assuming that most of what they will do and be responsible for on a day-to-day basis won’t be all that different, says MacKenzie Kyle, a management consultant and author of The Performance Principle: A Practical Guide to Understanding Motivation in the Modern Workplace. Given that there is limited time each day, and that management responsibilities are their own full-time job, this can result in significant personal stress, working excessive hours as the person attempts to do two jobs, and feeling like he or she has to ‘waste’ time on activities like communication and reporting, which doesn’t produce the same immediate and obvious results as ‘production’ work.

But, as a manager, it is now a big part of your daily job to effectively facilitate the flow of information. So don’t expect that as a manager you’ll get to avoid those regular status meetings or email updates; instead, you’ll be the driving force behind them.

“You are moving to a role that includes a significant component of communication,” says Kyle.

And that means communicating with different personalities, styles, and generations. That in itself is another great challenge all new managers must master. Especially for Millennials trying to communicate and report up across generations, specifically with baby boomers.

In fact, reporting challenges between generations in the workplace are an offshoot of the Grand Communication Canyon between Baby Boomers and Millennials, says Chris Butsch, author of The Millennial’s Guide to Making Happiness, a positive psychology book for young people driven by humor, science, and stories from Millennials around the world. So what’s driving these generations apart? Well, they both want something the other isn’t providing.

Millennials want feedback.

“I’m often asked why we seem to need feedback at every turn, and the answer is quite simple: this is the system we’re used to,” says Butsch. “We’re the most educated generation in America’s history; with over 50% of us holding college degrees. That means more than any generation before us, we’ve spent more time in the education system receiving precise feedback on everything. Even in college, which prepares us for work, we received a percentage score on every deliverable: Here’s what you did right, here’s where you screwed up, 89%, B+.”

But baby boomers are industrious and often bottom-line driven, says Butsch. So if you are a new manager communicating with a baby boomer follow these guidelines from Butsch when managing the flow of communication in the workplace:

Imagine this scenario: Yesterday morning, your client asked for something you have no experience in. This afternoon the manager who you report to asks this:

Haven’t heard from XYZ client in a week- how are things going?

BAD REPORT: Yesterday morning they asked for something I don’t know much about, so I’m kinda stuck. Could you help?

This response creates more questions and more work – baby boomers – often senior managers in today’s corporate hierarchy, hate this. Instead, impress them by showing how much work you’ve already done, covering the three bases above:

GOOD REPORT: (1) Things are well and we’re speeding towards go-live by Monday EOD. I’ve completed 5 of the 7 tasks this week. (2) However, they’ve asked for recommendations for ideal CRM software, and (3) while I’ve thoroughly researched the top 4 options (Pipedrive, Salesforce, Insightly, and Zoho), I don’t feel qualified to make a recommendation without experience. Could you connect me with someone who might have experience in this area?

The latter response tells them things are going well, you’re on schedule, and you specify precisely where you need help.

The biggest thing to remember when communicating as a manager, whether it’s with direct reports, or to senior leaders is this, says Butsch: Stop treating everyone the same.

Butsch references a 75-year-long Harvard study that found the No. 1 indicator of life satisfaction is the quality of our relationships. If you build relationships with the people around you, you’re also building trust, likability, and efficiency between you.

“Building a working relationship doesn’t necessarily mean being buddy-buddy with everyone; it means understanding them,” says Butsch.

How can new managers understand the many different personalities and work styles across generations in the workplace? Start by making mental baseball cards, says Butsch. Like this:

Danielle (hospital director)
Likes: directness, short meetings, short emails
Hates: getting lost in details, anyone who’s late

Kyle (scheduling software analyst)
Likes: positive feedback, 1-1 attention, clear walkthroughs
Hates: feeling lost, going too long without feedback

So if communicating with Danielle and Kyle, Butsch would spend an hour walking Kyle through a new workflow, then fire Danielle a 1-sentence email letting her know that the scheduling software is on track.

As you build these relationships, and start to understand each person’s own unique style – and quirks – you’ll simply enjoy working with more people, and will also build trust with them, meaning you’ll feel more comfortable asking for favors or support in times of need, adds Butsch.

The reality of the job of manager is often different than expectations, and a large number of people don’t find the activities of being a manager – all the communication, supporting other people to do the actual work while dealing with many of their problems, rewarding, says Kyle. But the manager’s role is to coordinate and support the production work (not to do it) and this requires significant time spent simply communicating with the members of the team. Learning how to communicate successfully with different personalities and across generations is a big factor in one’s success as a manager.

Are you ready to make that change? Then you’re ready to succeed as a first-time manager.

Want more management tips and career advice? Stay connected to College Recruiter by visiting our blog, and connect with us on LinkedInTwitterFacebook, and YouTube.

Posted July 13, 2016 by

Career assessments: Valuable at all stages of one’s career

Job candidate reading assignment in assessment center

Completing a career assessment can help job seekers at all stages of their career.

A career assessment is a great way for college students to learn more about the type of career they could pursue, based on their personality, interests, goals, and aspirations. But career assessments can also be beneficial for college students completing an internship, new college grads, and entry-level employees looking to make that next step in their career.

The reason is simple: “Learning about oneself is an ongoing, lifelong search,” says Stephanie P. Kennedy, co-founder of My College Planning Team (MCPT), a Downers Grove, Illinois-based company that provides college students and families with a variety of financial and academic/career planning resources.

There are a variety of popular career assessments that have value at all stages of one’s college and professional career. The staff at My College Planning Team uses a combination of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® and the Holland Code Test. They also use and favor the YouScience assessment, an assessment that helps students reveal their paths to education and career success.

Taking a career assessment can be of value, but taking a career assessment and working with a college career counselor, career coach, or other career services professional to expand on those results can add real value.

“Self-assessment based largely on what the computer program identifies you as can be misleading, frustrating, and downright false,” says Kennedy. “Career counselors and educational consultants are trained to interpret these assessments and are skilled in presenting them in a customized manner.”

The team at MCPT excels in working with students who may want to learn more about how to get the most out of an assessment.

“While the assessment tools are efficient and highly respected in our field, the value of those assessments comes from our customized processing of the results with each person,” says Kennedy.

It’s never too late to take a career assessment. And it’s even more beneficial to complete a career assessment and get further analysis and guidance by partnering with a career professional who can help you plan your career based on the results of these assessments. Like Kennedy said, learning is lifelong. A thorough career assessment with a qualified counselor can be very helpful.

“For most people, the task of career exploration will not end with high school graduation, or with college graduation,” says Kennedy. “The tools of career assessment can aid you in your career exploration and decisions throughout your lifetime.”

For more tips on career assessments and other job search advice, stay connected by following College Recruiter on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Stephanie Kennedy, co-founder of My College Planning Team

Stephanie Kennedy, co-founder of My College Planning Team

Stephanie Kennedy is co-founder of My College Planning Team. She holds a M.S. in Counseling and College Student Development. A former admissions counselor, her team now helps students identify their passions and find the colleges that are the best fit academically, socially, and with career focus. Kennedy has worked at the University of Miami, Northeastern University, Texas A&M University, Stonehill College, and others. She has read hundreds of college applications and assisted thousands of students in their college adjustment and educational path. With her hands-on perspective, she guides students and families in a successful college search that goes far beyond the acceptance letter.

 

Posted July 16, 2014 by

Listen Up, Recent College Graduates Searching for Jobs! 9 Tips from Young Professionals that Can Make a Difference

Recent college graduates who are searching for jobs should pay attention to these nine tips offered by young professionals in the following post.

For recent graduates, that first job search is rough… perhaps now more than ever. To help with that challenge, our friends at Young Entrepreneur Council asked their members this question: “What’s your best advice for a recent college grad embarking on a serious job hunt for the first time?” The result is some great advice

Continue reading here –

Continue Reading

Posted July 08, 2014 by

Want to Move Your Entry Level Job Search Along? 3 Steps that Can Help

If you have been searching for an entry level job and feel like you’re not getting anywhere, check out three steps in the following post to help move your search along.

About an hour after I got married, I lost my job. I’m exaggerating slightly, but I’m sure that’s what my in-laws probably thought. After our wedding, I moved their Georgian daughter up to Boston for my job—and then promptly lost it. Those were not fun months. A lot of young professionals are in

View original article –

Continue Reading

Posted June 10, 2014 by

You Should Be Using This Job Interview Technique

Anna Crowe

Anna Crowe

Every recent college grad is looking to bring home the bacon, but first you need a strategy for a winning job interview. If you’re looking to land your first big gig, you need to approach each interview with a game plan and fearlessness.

You need to come armed and ready with a powerful first impression, but how? It’s simple: tell your story.

Here are my tips for narrating the perfect story: (more…)

Posted May 20, 2014 by

Dealing with an Experience Dilemma While Searching for Jobs for Recent College Graduates? How to Handle It

If you have little or no experience in your search for jobs for recent college graduates, the following post has advice on how to handle it.

I was listening to a radio station segment with a hiring manager and blogger Russell B on how to handle resume gaps. A fairly recent college graduate’s question caught my ear. Basically, he hadn’t found a job in a field even closely related to his major. He wondered how to handle work experience that isn’t directly

Continue reading:

Continue Reading

Posted May 15, 2014 by

Searching for Entry Level Jobs? Some of the Best and Worst Positions

If you’re currently searching for entry level jobs, learn about some of the best and worst ones according to the following post.

What do you look for when you’re looking for your first job? Growth potential? A high starting salary? Fancy snacks in the break room? There are dozens of factors that determine whether an entry-level position will prove to be…

Read this article:

Continue Reading

Posted February 21, 2014 by

Are You Twitter Searching Jobs for Recent College Graduates? Improve Use of SEO

If you’re currently searching jobs for recent college graduates on Twitter, improving your use of SEO could boost your chances of finding employment.  Learn how in the following post.

Recruiters and potential employers search Google for job candidates… and Google loves Twitter. So, by leveraging search engine optimization (SEO) techniques in Twitter, you can make it easier for recruiters to find you! When someone searches on the job title you want, your profession or industry (and also your name) you want to

Visit site:

Continue Reading

Posted July 16, 2013 by

On the Hunt for a New Entry Level Job? 3 Ways to Help You Find One More Quickly

College grads, if you’re anxious to find an entry level job, the following post has three ways that might help you get one faster.

I lost my job about an hour after I got married. I’m exaggerating, but that’s what my in-laws probably thought. After our wedding, I moved their Georgian daughter to Boston for my job—and then promptly lost it. Those were not fun months. A lot of people are in a

Link –

3 Things You Should Do Right Now to Find a Job Faster

Posted February 07, 2012 by

Breaking Into the Hospitality Industry Requires the Right Resume

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez of Great Resumes Fast

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez of Great Resumes Fast

The hospitality industry is wonderfully vast, providing interested job seekers a wide array of professional options. Whether you’re looking to be an executive chef or a hotel accountant, there is something for you to do that you’ll love.

Because there are so many opportunities for employment in hospitality, some think that it’s easier to enter this industry than others. In some respects, this may be true, depending on the field that’s being compared, but overall, you still have to work hard to get your foot in the door and should therefore know a few tricks to help get you started. (more…)