ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia and author, Barnellbe.

Posted April 26, 2019 by

What are the consequences to students who renege on job offers?

I’ve been participating in an interesting discussion in a listserv managed by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. Most of the readers are talent acquisition leaders from Fortune 1,000 and other large employers and college career service office professionals. A small percentage of readers are like me in that they work for organizations which, in one way or another, help college and university students and recent graduates find great careers.

The discussion that prompted me to write this blog article is about whether employers should report to a career service office that a student who accepted a job offer later reneged on that offer. One employer volunteered that they do send lists of those reneges to the career service offices. I wonder if that employer and others like them are providing any context provided to the reasons for the student reneging on the offer or any opportunity provided to them to provide the context.

Let’s be honest, sometimes the student reneges on their employment-at-will relationship because they change their mind and we can point a finger at them as the party to blame, if there is a need to assign blame. But what if an objective, third-party would actually point to the employer? Reasons are numerous, such as when employers oversell the opportunity, materially change the compensation or position, the hiring manager is terminated or reassigned, a family emergency prevents the student from starting, the employer pivots or even eliminates the business unit that recruited the student, the economy very suddenly and very dramatically changes as it did in 2008, etc. 

Realistically, if an employer is going to report student reneges to the career service office, what do we expect the career service office to do with that information? Wouldn’t it make sense that there would be negative repercussions to the student, and are we trying to help that student or are we trying to punish them and dissuade future students from reneging, much like imprisoning criminals punish the perpetrator and, perhaps, dissuade others from committing the same crime. Do we want to model our college and university recruitment programs on the criminal justice system?

For the career service offices who are accepting the renege information from the employers and maybe even soliciting it, are you doing the same from the candidates? What about employers who renege on their offers? If you’re punishing the student in some way such as banning them from further use of your services, are you levying the same punishments against the employers? 

Posted September 09, 2014 by

College Graduates, Don’t Quit Your Jobs Just Yet. How to Make Them Better

For college graduates thinking about quitting their jobs, check out the following post to learn ways to make them better.

Your job is an endless repetition of nothingness. The days could not go slower while your life just seems to pass you by. It’s messing with your energy levels and your sense of joy. You know this can’t go on for much longer. You’re stuck in a dead-end job, and it

Link:

Continue Reading

Posted November 13, 2013 by

Thinking About Quitting Those Recent Graduate Jobs? 9 Reasons Not to Give Up

While young professionals may find their recent graduate jobs stressful at times, that does not mean they should quit them.  So before they think about leaving their employers, the following post offers nine reasons not to give up on their jobs.

I recently wrote an article 9 Reasons to Quit and was touched by those who reached out to me saying how the article resonated with them. I didn’t, however, want young careerists to get the wrong impression and start quitting everything they started. After all, my favorite life motto’s is by Helen Keller who said, “The woman who began the race

Link –

Continue Reading

Posted October 16, 2013 by

How to Make it Through Your Entry Level Job in the First Year

If you’re anxious about making it through the first day of your entry level job, you are probably not thinking about how to make it through the first year.  However, you can do it by considering some tips in the following post.

Some people aren’t prepared for their first day of work, let alone learning how to navigate office obstacles to build a career. Between you and your three best friends, one won’t make it through the first year, and two won’t last 18 months. Don’t be a statistic. (Click here to tweet this thought.) Learn to

Originally from –

Continue Reading

Posted August 27, 2013 by

Enough Is Enough: Walking Away from a Bad Internship

quit your internshipWalking away from a full-time professional job is serious business. True storm-outs are rare in the working world, and when they happen, they’re intense and occasionally awkward.

Walking away from an internship, however, is a different story. Although internships are a valuable way to get hands-on exposure to the professional working world—and potentially transition into a full-time job—these opportunities might become more illusion than reality. (more…)

Posted May 16, 2013 by

Despite High Unemployment Overall, Severe Talent Shortage Plaguing Some Sectors and Regions

John Challenger of Challenger, Gray & Christmas

John Challenger of Challenger, Gray & Christmas

Rising quit rates and fewer job seekers vying for open positions could signal a return to the types of labor shortages that plagued employers during the dot.com boom.  While widespread talent shortages are probably five to ten years away, some regions and industries already may be feeling the pinch, according to the workplace authorities at global outplacement consultancy Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

“With 11.6 million Americans still unemployed as of April, it may be difficult for most to contemplate labor shortages.  However, it is important that not all of the unemployed reside where jobs are being created at the fastest rate and many lack the skills required to fill the openings that exist.  These two factors alone make skill shortages a reality right now for some employers,” said John A. Challenger, chief executive officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas.  (more…)

Posted March 14, 2013 by

Bad Career Advice: Six Tips You’ll Often Hear But Should Usually Ignore

LiveCareer_Bad career adviceCollege students who are about to cross the threshold between academia and working life are typically besieged with well-meaning advice. Some of this advice is wise and useful, some of it is suspect and some of it is just plain silly. But when you’ve never actually taken a single step into the professional world, it can be hard to sort the good advice from the clichés, the popular myths and the questionable nonsense. Here are six common words of wisdom for young graduates that may warrant a closer look. (more…)
Posted May 24, 2012 by

Don’t Quit Your Job Just Yet

William Frierson of CollegeRecruiter.comDo you have a job that you don’t like?  Maybe it is to the point that you’ve had enough (for whatever reason(s)) and are ready for a change.  However, before quitting your job, consider this advice: (more…)
Posted November 09, 2011 by

Why More People Quitting Their Jobs Is A Good Economic Indicator

There were 3.4 million job openings on the last business day of
September, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The
hires rate (3.2 percent) and separations rate (3.2 percent) were
little changed over the month. The job openings rate has trended
upward since the end of the recession in June 2009 (as determined by
the National Bureau of Economic Research). This release includes
estimates of the number and rate of job openings, hires, and
separations for the nonfarm sector by industry and by geographic
region. (more…)
Posted November 03, 2011 by

32% of Employees Seriously Considering Quitting Their Jobs

Employee loyalty is dropping around the world, according to new global analysis of Mercer’s What’s Working™ survey. The research, conducted among nearly 30,000 employees in 17 geographic markets between the fourth quarter of 2010 and the second quarter of 2011, shows that the percentage of workers seriously considering leaving their organization has risen since the last time the survey was conducted in each market (between 2003 and 2006 prior to the economic downturn).

In many markets, the increase is 10 percentage points or more. In the US, the increase was 9 points, from 23% in 2005 to 32% in 2010. (more…)