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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 09, 2016 by

3 online networking tips

As a college student, you might be an expert at using social networking apps like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, and Whisper for connecting with friends and communicating about day-to-day life, but do you admittedly need guidance when it comes to networking online for professional reasons? It’s one thing to post pictures of your weekend adventures with your best friends—it’s another to reach out to your social network for assistance when conducting your first full-time job or internship search.

This brief video featuring Career and Disability Services Coordinator, Rebecca Warren, of the University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville, highlights three simple tips for making the most of social media when networking online for professional purposes.


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1)      Clean up your social media pages, profiles, and online presence before becoming active in your job search.

Networking online via social media for professional purposes is a different animal than using social media for personal reasons.  Make sure everything you post (or have visible and set to “public”) is appropriate; would you feel comfortable with the content being seen by an employer or by someone listed as a job reference? If not, delete it. Delete statuses and posts including curse words and long rants, Tweets with awful grammar, and photos portraying you in a negative or scandalous light. The rule of thumb is to always yourself positively and professionally, particularly when conducting a job search. Don’t begin the online networking process until you’ve taken this first step.

2)      Let your existing network know you are preparing to begin a job search.

Let your contacts—friends, family, and other contacts you are already connected to online– know about your career field (which is probably related to your college major), where your interests lie, where you have completed internships, etc.  Be careful when reaching out; when networking online, you never want to demand assistance or seem pushy, arrogant, or nonchalant. When asking for assistance in your job search, attempt to come across as gracious and patient. Remember, your social media contacts are under no obligation to assist you—expressing gratitude for any act of support or assistance is always a good idea!

Your social network will grow based on the people your existing connections know.

Rebecca Warren, Career and Disability Services Coordinator, UACCB

Rebecca Warren, Career and Disability Services Coordinator, UACCB

“If your existing network online doesn’t know you’re conducting a job search, they can’t help you,” says Rebecca Warren.

If you build the support of your initial contacts, you already have many people cheering you on before you even begin.

3)      Connect online via social media with professional groups in your field.

Many professional organizations host pages or groups on social media platforms, including LinkedIn and Facebook, and some even host weekly online Twitter discussions. Connecting with professional organizations and getting involved in discussions requires effort on your part, but this work pays off. You never know when a member of a group might know about an unlisted job opening or an upcoming job opening within his organization. If you are regularly participating in online discussions and making intelligent contributions to discussions, the member may reach out to you about the job opening.

Networking online is similar to networking face-to-face; it’s an ongoing process, and it’s about relationships. Whether you’re using social media apps or participating in professional groups and discussion boards, simply treat people professionally and with common courtesies, and you’ll find your online network growing exponentially.

To begin practicing these three great tips for using social media to your advantage in your job search, visit College Recruiter on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

 

Posted May 08, 2015 by

3 resumes mistakes recent graduates are still making

Maria Onzain photo

Maria Onzain

Looking for a job after years of experience is completely different than doing it for the first time. When you are starting out, you need to get more creative and have the right attitude to close the deal.

Getting your first job starts from writing a great resume. On top of emphasizing your education, internships or summer activities, there are many other things you can do to write a killer resume.

You can start by avoiding these 3 common mistakes that recent graduates are still making in their resumes: (more…)

Posted August 11, 2014 by

10 Best Questions a Recent Graduate Can Ask a Mentor While Searching for Jobs

If you are a recent graduate searching for jobs, having a mentor can provide some guidance for your career.  Here are the 10 best questions to ask a mentor, according to the following post.

You finally gathered up enough courage to ask a mentor, or potential mentor, for a cup of coffee. The pressure is mounting. You’re sweating, a lot; there aren’t enough Starbucks napkins in the world to dry your palms. And just when you think you have enough time to hit the

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Posted June 26, 2014 by

Want to Get an Employee Referral for an Entry Level Job? 5 Ways to Earn One

If you’re looking for an entry level job, getting an employee referral could make a difference in your job search.  Learn five ways to earn one in the following post.

According to Jobvite, employee referrals get hired faster than candidates from company career sites. In addition, HR professionals rate employee referrals as the No. 1 source for quality hires! In fact, Jobvite reports that 44 percent of new hires are employee referrals. So how does one take advantage of this hiring trend? Here are five ways to earn an employee

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Posted June 03, 2014 by

Grads, Beginning to Search for Entry Level Jobs? 12 Tips to Get Your Career Going

Once they have walked across the stage at graduation, many new graduates will likely begin searching for entry level jobs.  In order to succeed in getting their careers going, they should check out these 12 tips in the following post.

The Onion recently published a satirical article that featured a 2014 graduate preparing for his 14-month post-grad job search. The piece highlighted how the graduate will spend his time after college “scouring online job listings, endlessly revising a resume no one will ever look at, and submitting 10 to 20 job applications every day to which he will never receive a single

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Posted January 16, 2014 by

Internship Finder, Here Are 9 Places You May Not Have Thought to Find These Positions

If you’re an internship finder searching for an opportunity, the following post shares nine places you may not have thought about finding these positions.

When you’re looking for internships, there are some pretty basic search methods everyone knows. There are big job boards like Internships.com, Glassdoor, and Indeed.com that list hundreds of internships all around the world. The problem with big sites like these is that everyone uses them, so the positions

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Posted August 28, 2013 by

Starting an Entry Level Job in a New Location? How to Overcome Feeling Lonely

It’s one thing to begin a new entry level job, but how about starting one in a new place without knowing anyone.  If you are in this position, the following post has advice to overcome feeling lonely.

To the class of 2013, congratulations! Many of you will now embark on your next adventure: a new job in a new city. A fresh start is always exciting. Not only do you get to spread your wings; you also get to do what you’ve wanted to do professionally for years. There’s just one holdup

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Posted July 09, 2012 by

92% of Employers Use Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn to Hire New Employees

Twitter birdA new survey confirms what most in the recruiting industry already know: the use of social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn have become an essential practice amongst human resource professionals with 92 percent of U.S. companies using social networks and media to find talent in 2012, up from 78 percent five years ago. LinkedIn continues to be a dominant recruiting network, while Facebook and Twitter have seen major adoption growth in the past year.

Two-thirds of companies now recruit through Facebook and 54 percent use Twitter to find new talent. Jobvite‘s June 2012 Social Recruiting Survey of 1,000 human resource and recruiting professionals also found that employers scrutinize social media activity, noting more than half of respondents would have a negative reaction to seeing a spelling or grammar mistake in a social profile. Overall, social recruiting has become an essential tool for recruiters and can be expected to become even more important as 89 percent of the companies surveyed report plans to increase hiring this year. (more…)