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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Lily Rose-Wilson

Posted June 04, 2019 by

Employers shouldn’t — but still do — stalk candidates on Facebook

One of my favorite podcasts that sits at the intersection of human resources and technology a/k/a HRtech is The Chad and Cheese Podcast. The hosts are friends Chad Sowash and Joel Cheesman, each of whom have been in the industry for two decades and regularly compete with each other to see who can out-snark the other. Shows are usually about 40-minutes long, easy to listen to, and informative.

Toward the end of the May 31st episode, Chad and Joel got into a discussion about an employer in Australia or New Zealand — they couldn’t remember where — who left a voice message for a candidate that was a little more revealing than the employer planned. Apparently, the employer didn’t realize they were still being recorded and started to discuss the candidate’s fake tan, tattoos, and other items which weren’t at all relevant to the candidate’s ability to do the work. Big thumbs down to the employer.

I did a little Googling and found the story on news.com.au. So, it was an Australian employer. Perth to be exact. The employer was Michelle Lines from STS Health and the candidate was Lily Rose-Wilson. In the recording, Lines can be heard discussing Rose-Wilson’s Facebook photos with a male colleague.

According to news.com.au, the conversation went as follows: “Not answering the phone now,” Ms Lines says. Her colleague suggests she’s “probably getting another tattoo”, to which Ms Lines responds, “She’s probably doing her fake tan.” The male asks, “Did you really like, Facebook stalk?”, and Ms Lines says, “That’s what you got to do, babe”. “Yeah, well it’s very thorough, good on you,” he replies.

Ugh. I’ve been speaking about how employers wrongfully use Facebook and other social media sites since Facebook was only accessible to students, staff, and faculty at dozens of colleges and universities. I really, really thought that employers had grown up and realized that sites like Facebook are great sourcing tools if they’re used to help the employer be more inclusive when hiring and should never be used to exclude candidates from the hiring pool. Yet, here we are again. Ugh.

To the candidates reading this blog, beware. Understand that every organization is made up of individuals and individuals all make mistakes. And some make more mistakes than others. But even if an individual within an organization to which you’ve applied makes a mistake and looks at your Facebook profile to see if they can find a reason to eliminate you from the candidate pool does not mean that you should cross that employer off of your list. Chances are, the person will be in HR and unless you’re applying to work in HR you’ll likely never interact with that person after you’re hired.

Don’t leave yourself open to the irrational, mistaken whims of some idiot who decides that looking at your tan or tattoos is a good idea when deciding whether you’re qualified for a job. If that matters to you as it does to many candidates, then lock down your privacy so that the prospective employer cannot see those photos. And if they’re the kind of photos that you’d be embarrassed to show your favorite grandmother, get them off of your profile altogether.

Posted May 27, 2015 by

Major Tips to Create Dynamic Presentations

Businessman giving presentation on projector screen to colleagues in office

Businessman giving presentation on projector screen to colleagues in office. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

In today’s world, no one has time to sit and read lengthy instructions or pages full of information. The emphasis is placed instead on convenience and efficiency. Individuals, be they students or professionals, are busier than ever. They have more on their plate than they ever have before. Students, for example, tend to be taking more credit hours, working more hours, and spending more time on extracurricular activities than in the past. They don’t have the time or desire to spend their precious free time on anything that is less than compelling. Professionals are in the same boat: today’s professional works more hours than in the past, in part thanks to the ever-changing methods of communication. They are almost always able to be in contact with customers, coworkers, and loved ones. (more…)

Posted August 11, 2006 by

How to find a job using new media (podcasts, blogs, etc.)

I’ve been a part of the hiring process here at the Student Loan Network for several weeks now, reviewing applications for technology and marketing positions. I am consistently shocked at how people who are supposed to be cutting edge in technology and new media fail to incorporate any significant technology in their self-marketing. Out of hundreds of resumes, exactly ONE has had a personal web site with it.
In today’s show, I talk about how you can use new media – podcasting, blogs, video podcasting/vlogging – to land yourself a new job and help you stand out from the crowd, particularly in today’s stagnant economy.
Check it out at:
The Financial Aid Podcast Web Site
If you have iTunes, visit:
FinancialAidPodcast.com/itunes
As always, please contact me with any feedback, either here, on the show, or on the phone.