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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted August 09, 2016 by

Common networking mistakes to avoid

Dishonesty, moral dilemma, liar photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

As college students and recent graduates enter the workforce, they will likely meet people who can assist them with their job searches. When these opportunities arise, job seekers be prepared to take advantage of them. While some job seekers may not be the most outgoing in terms of personality, they can still be effective when networking. However, if students and grads don’t understand how to network, they can hurt their chances of building important relationships that can advance their careers. So as job seekers attend networking events, they must be mindful of what not to do. Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University, highlights common networking mistakes to avoid.

“Blindly reaching out without knowing basic information about a person, the kind of details usually found through a quick Google or LinkedIn search, is a red flag signaling a bad start to the networking experience. A wishful connection will be less likely to engage if college students or prospective hires don’t bring any background knowledge to the table.

Expecting a networking connection will “tell me what to do.” Before reaching out, know the information you want. It’s helpful to have an informal script handy. “My name is Sue Smith; I’m a business major and art history minor interested in an entry-level job working in the cosmetic industry in New York. I’m hoping to secure a summer internship. Could you share with me how you got into the industry and any suggestions or recommendations you might have?”

Thinking the number of connections matters. Networking is about relationships, not numbers. Targeted outreach to people who share common interests makes networking effective. Two people may connect in an unlimited number of ways, such as graduating from the same school, being from the same hometown, choosing a similar academic path, or by an interest in a particular career. Whatever it is, a real connection matters.

The first outreach is inappropriate or unprofessional. Treat networking opportunities as professional conversations. It’s easier to move from formal to casual than vice-versa. Having good manners and dressing appropriately (which is very different if you’re interested in a career in journalism versus a career on Wall Street) is critical in creating the first impression that builds your reputation.”

Want to learn more about networking mistakes? Head to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University

Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University

With more than 25 years of experience in the private sector, nearly half assisting organizations with recruiting, interviewing, and hiring top talent, Mike Summers, Director of Employer Relations at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, has an insider’s understanding of what employers are seeking and helping students and recent grads showcase their academic skills and personal experiences. Wake Forest’s one, university-wide employer relations team means Summers has experience with and supports the employment search for students in all academic areas, teaching and empowering them to articulate the value of their education for today’s employers.

Posted May 23, 2016 by

5 tips to manage a stress-free online job search

Women laptop photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Today, most job searches are conducted online. Although some parts of the country will still focus on more personable job searches, the majority of young Americans will be searching for their first entry-level jobs on computers. Online job searches are both convenient and troublesome. Recent graduates no longer have to go to an employment agency’s office or endlessly drop in on various professionals in order to gain employment in a company; rather they can conduct all of their employment research from the comfort of their own homes. On the other hand, potential entry-level employees can be difficult to distinguish from one another because their résumés tend to look similar. On paper, new grads can appear to be one and the same, but in person their different skills, interests, and personalities can shine through. For many employers, the right personality is just as valuable as qualifications on paper. So how can recent grads manage their online job search without becoming entirely overwhelmed?

1) Focus the job search

New grads who have obtained broad degrees such as in business or communications will be able to apply to a diverse range of jobs. However, applying to several different jobs in several different subfields can become stressful very quickly. Job seekers are encouraged to focus their searches on a particular job title (and similar positions) during their online searches. They should start with a subfield they feel passionate about because their excitement for the position (or lack thereof) will shine through and give them a better chance of achieving interviews.

2) Supplement with in-person contacts and connections

Although online job searches are convenient, they are not always successful if conducted without the help of in-person contacts. Former professors and alumni connections are an essential part of a first time job search, and they can provide introductions and tips that can be extremely valuable. An online resume can easily go from the middle of the pile to the top with an introduction or recommendation coming from someone already within the company.

3) Pick a time of day to call it quits

At some point, job seekers have to call it quits, at least for that day. In many cases, recent grads are searching for a job late in the evening after coming home from their part-time college jobs. Job seekers don’t do a great job of proofreading or checking for important details late at night and often send out applications they later wish they could have taken a second look at. The late hours of the evening also come with varying degrees of mental fatigue that result from a full day’s work. Even if job seekers are a few minutes away from finishing an important application, they’re encouraged to proofread the next morning with fresh eyes.

4) Go the extra mile

Because most current applicants don’t reach out in person or on the phone, those who do will get more attention. If there is a number for an HR Manager or department head, applicants should give them a call and introduce themselves or ask any pertinent questions regarding the position. Instead of following up with just an email, follow up with a personable phone call. Applicants who are giving an interview are encouraged to send a handwritten thank-you note that will make them stand out from the crowd.

5) Put a little piece of your personality in each cover letter

Because the hiring manager only learns about applicants from a couple pieces of paper, it’s important their personalities shine through. Most applicants write one cover letter and gear it towards each position. However, an applicant’s skills and passion tend to become apparent when each cover letter is written from scratch. Additionally, it’s important that job seekers write their cover letters at a time of day when they have a lot of energy and enthusiasm. It’s also a great idea to ask another person to proofread a cover letter and make sure that it’s personable, professional, and easy to read.

For more help with your online job search, make you way to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Robyn Scott, guest writer

Robyn Scott, guest writer

Robyn Scott, a guest writer for College Recruiter, is a private tutor with TutorNerds LLC. She has a BA from the University of California, Irvine, and a MA from the University of Southampton, UK.

Posted March 12, 2016 by

Preparing introverts and extroverts for the job search

Extrovert or introvert as a choice of different belief courtesy of Shutterstock.com

kentoh/Shutterstock.com

Introverts and extroverts handle things in very different ways. School counselors’ job is to help all of their students, and one of the best ways to do this is to know how introverts and extroverts prefer to do things. When preparing them to leave college and enter the job market, there are several things a counselor can do that will help tailor students’ paths with their personalities.

Discover which they are

Before school counselors begin counseling students based on their personalities, they have to determine if students are introverts or extroverts. Unless counselors have a longstanding and personal connection with students, it is probably a good idea to give them some tests to help determine their personality style. Tests — such as this one from Psychology Today — will help determine whether students are introverts or extroverts. Often students themselves are not aware of their own styles, and doing the test will be beneficial to both students and counselors.

Inform students how their personalities can impact their jobs

Many people do not know the difference between introverts and extroverts, and they often don’t know which category they fall into. Once school counselors have determined which one students are through some tests, they can begin telling students about what it means. Explain to students how extroverts and introverts may tackle different scenarios, and how they prefer to do things.

Choose the right application method

Now that both counselors and students understand the latter’s personality type, they can begin tailoring the application process for when they are looking for jobs. For example, counselors can tell extroverts that face-to-face interviews are better for them, since they are more outgoing, while introverts may be better at cover letters and resumes.

However, some application types cannot be avoided; in this case, counselors should help students improve on things that are not necessarily their strengths. For example, here are some ways that introverts can prepare for interviews.

In addition, school counselors can steer them towards jobs more suited to their personalities. As an example, an introvert may not be best suited for a sales position job, or one requiring a lot of group work. On the other hand, an extrovert is probably not suited for a job requiring them to work long hours alone.

College sports male volleyball finals in Milan courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Paolo Bona/Shutterstock.com

Suggest outside activities

Since a lot of college students do not have work experience they can add to their resumes, outside activities can help bolster them. Give students some options for things they can get involved with that will be suited for their personality types, along with their interests. The more activities they can get involved with, the better their resumes will look.

Encourage them to explore outside their style

While it is a good idea for students to play to their strengths, that does not mean they should avoid anything that makes them uncomfortable. School counselors should encourage students to keep an open mind, and to try some things not necessarily suited to their personality types. At some point along their career paths, students are probably going to do something outside their normal comfort zones, and by expanding their horizons now, they will be better equipped to handle it in the future.

Hopefully this short list will help school counselors tailor the counseling of their students. Helping students realize what their strengths are and how they can utilize them is a great tool for after they graduate and will help guide them for years to come.

Need more tips for your job search? Learn more at College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Photo of Tony Newton

Tony Newton, guest writer

Tony Newton is a contributing author for @DailyKos and @NationOfChange His favorite subjects are social awareness campaigns and public policy in pedagogy.

Posted January 29, 2016 by

Preparing for the corporate world – A guide for college students

Photo of Barney Whistance

Barney Whistance, guest writer

As graduation draws near, anxiety along with trepidation of getting a decent job seems to take over. Why not save yourself from impending doom by being prepared beforehand and present yourself in the best possible manner for recruiters to hire you? Opportunities are endless, but it is up to you how you avail them. We hope to guide you to pave your career path and minimize the imminent danger lingering around the horizon of not doing justice to your years of academics and hard work. Formulating an effective job search strategy will bring you in close proximity to recruiters, searching ardently for a potential candidate and increase your chances of getting hired. (more…)

Posted January 20, 2016 by

9 ways job seekers can stand out

Whether it be college students or other young job seekers, finding employment doesn’t necessarily come easily to college students. However, the more effort college students put into their job searches, the more they will get out of them. Amber Stover, Director of Talent Acquisition for Edmunds.com, provides tips for anyone seeking to improve their job searches and stand out from the crowd. (more…)

Posted November 25, 2015 by

4 steps to using social media for uncovering the hidden job market

Social media is an important tool for today’s job seekers. How job seekers present themselves online can either help or hurt their job searches. This applies not only to visible job openings but also those in the hidden job market. Employers haven’t advertised these jobs publicly but need to fill them. The following webinar, 4 steps to using social media for uncovering the hidden job market, shares tips for using social media to learn about job opportunities along with other valuable information. (more…)

Posted November 18, 2015 by

Resume and cover letter secrets to help you land job interviews and offers

Finding a new job requires job seekers to present themselves in the best manner. Two key documents in job searches include resumes and cover letters. These documents work together to secure the job interview and, hopefully, desired job offers. The following webinar, Resume and cover letter secrets to help you land more job interviews and offers, discusses differences between resumes and cover letters, shares resume and cover letter tips, and offers additional advice to job seekers. (more…)

Posted August 25, 2015 by

How to Become a Go Getter at the Workplace

a determined young businessman on the go.

A determined young businessman on the go. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

What’s the difference between a robust employee in the workplace and the one who “checks out” of work even when he is present? They could be working under the same boss, having the same credentials, or even providing the same quality of work (that is when they are both motivated). The main difference, hence, may lie in a personality trait that differentiates successful people from the unsuccessful ones. One’s a go-getter and the other is more of a no-getter.

Which one are you? If you’re reading this post, then you’re probably looking forward to knowing what it takes to be a go-getter and not only be able to motivate yourself at work every single day, but also power up others around you with your spark.

To become that, you need to adopt a go-getter mentality and this is what it’s like… (more…)

Posted August 07, 2015 by

Entry Level Jobs 101: What You Need to Know for Career Success

real people at the office. female employee on duty.

Real people at the office. Female employee on duty. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

As a recent graduate, applying and interviewing for entry level jobs is the main focus of building your career. These positions provide an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills you acquired in college and become an expert in your industry.

Starting your first official job in the real world is different than working an internship and can be tricky to navigate at times. Here are a few tips to help you excel at the position and work your way up to a promotion: (more…)

Posted August 05, 2015 by

Create a Cover Letter That “Does You Proud”

Jimmy Sweeney

Jimmy Sweeney, President of CareerJimmy

Rhonda sat down at her desk to draft a cover letter for a job she really wanted—director of a preschool. She had recently completed the training for Preschool Director Certification and had five years of experience working in two different schools as a teacher. Now she was eager to move into a position with more responsibility and opportunity.

She stared at a picture of her grandfather on her desk. He had died just months before but his words still rang true for her. He was someone she looked up to all her life. In fact, his influence prompted her to work with young children so she could pass on to others the love and care she’d received from him.

“You’ve done me proud,” he’d said with a big smile when she received her credential. (more…)