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Posted April 29, 2016 by

20 ways to rock your resume

Resume with pen on table closeup courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Casper1774 Studio/Shutterstock.com

Another week without attention paid to your resume. You are applying for jobs that match your education and skills; you have a nicely formatted document; and you have outlined your work experience very well with bolded headings and bullet points like you were told to do. You’re qualified but just can’t manage to get that call for an interview. Could there be that many people more qualified than you? Maybe not. There may be some flaws in your resume you have not realized.

Here are 20 tips that can improve your resume.

Make sure you are emphasizing results, not responsibilities

It’s a common error; job seekers are trying very hard to list all of their responsibilities for each position. Their thinking, of course, is the more responsibilities, the more qualified they will be. What is more important to employers is the results, what job seekers have actually accomplished.

Take a look at the responsibilities you have listed for each position. Can you list any quantifiable results? Did your re-organization save the department $50,000 a year? Sometimes, you may think results will be hard to provide. For example, perhaps you took over a department that had no baseline data to work with to show improvement. And maybe the improvement was qualitative rather than quantitative. Take employee morale, for instance. You know you improved it when you took over that department. But how was the improvement measured? Maybe there was much lower turnover or maybe the rate of absenteeism dropped significantly. These are important figures to have. Never leave a position without gathering figures that support your results.

A lot of space was spent on this item. Why? Because it is the one thing employers say is usually missing from a resume.

Target skills/background for each position

This is the primary reason why you need to tweak each resume for every job opening. If you have background in training, administration, HR, and sales/sales management, and are applying for jobs that focus on one of those, then focus your resume in that direction. Spend far more space on that focus area than on others. Generic resumes don’t really work anymore.

Re-visit keywords for each position

Change out your keywords based upon two things: the job description and the company’s website. Sometimes, reading through the company’s home page and the “about us” page will give you more keywords to include. And keywords that relate to the position should be placed as close to the top of the resume as possible and included in your cover letter.

Include a summary section

A statement of your career goals at the beginning of your resume is not advisable. Companies don’t care about your goals; they care about what you “bring to the table.” Switch that out for a short summary of your skills and experience that relate to the position, with four to five sentences only.

Use standard software

Microsoft Word or a PDF version of your resume should be the only programs used to submit resumes. Scanning will probably not recognize any other programs, and you will never know your resume was unreadable.

Business woman unhappy with resumes of applicants and throwing them on the table courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Milles Studio/Shutterstock.com

Aim for one page

Edit, edit, edit. Take out anything superfluous, reduce sentences to phrases, and remove some of your contact information. Employers don’t need your address and don’t include references unless specifically asked to do so. If you are able to edit the resume to one page, that is ideal. But NEVER go beyond two pages unless you are preparing a CV.

Do not lie

Not about anything. Of course, you want to try to avoid resume mistakes, and of course you want to present yourself in the best light. Exaggerating or giving yourself a job title you did not actually have are big risks. These things can be discovered when references and/or social media are reviewed. Focus on your skills and qualifications completely but honestly.

Use action verbs

They are so much stronger. If you don’t know the difference, here is an example:

1. Responsible for implementing budget reduction by 10% without loss of productivity

2. Reduced budget by 10% without loss of productivity

The second phrase is strong and active. (P.S.: Never use “I”)

Visual appeal is a must

You’ve seen enough resume templates to understand what visual appeal is. The best font now is probably Arial, 12-14 point. The reason for this is there’s good, natural spacing between lines that are not complete and enough white space between bulleted points. Your final resume should have sub-headings in bold (e.g., each position), and a larger font to separate sections of the document. The goal is to make it scannable, not just by a computer program (applicant tracking systems), but by humans, too. No one wants to search for your information.

Be clear about job titles

So long as you are not exaggerating, use a job title that will make clear what you did at a previous organization. Sometimes, organizations have internal titles that mean nothing on the outside. So, if you were a “Level II Tech Support,” change that out to “Systems Analyst,” if that was what your position really entailed.

Be really brief

Do not use full sentences unless you are crafting a CV (These are prose documents). Brief phrases only, please. Remember – scannable.

Perfect grammar and spelling

Don’t rely only on grammar and spell-check programs. They will not recognize incorrect numbers or words that are wrong but are still words. And, in some instances misspellings will not be caught either. If you are really good in this area, read your resume backwards, and you will catch misspellings; read it forward line-by-line. If you are not highly skilled, get someone who is.

Avoid gimmicks

Having your resume hand-delivered by FedEx or courier is not appreciated, and, in fact, is a bit of a turnoff. Just don’t do it. Submit your resume according to the instructions on the job posting.

Graphics should fit the company culture

It is more acceptable today to use some color and graphics than in the past, but these resumes are best suited for younger, more progressive organizations. Tailor color and graphics based upon the culture of the company. If you are not sure, check the website. As a general rule, banks, financial, and educational/scientific institutions are conservative; tech and marketing companies are more progressive. For creative positions, graphics are certainly suitable.

Never state salary

Never include past salaries in your work experience. And absolutely never include your salary or benefit requirements for a new position. Epic fail if you do.

Don’t address negatives

If you were fired or laid off, never state this in your resume. That is the stuff for discussion during an interview. And don’t lie about it either; be as honest as possible, and never “trash” a former boss or company.

Add links

Long before submitting resumes, it will be important to have a professional online presence. Include the link to your LinkedIn profile and, if warranted, a website with a portfolio of your work and/or accomplishments. If you have been a guest blogger on relevant sites, provide links to those posts too.

Update consistently

It is often advised when you start a new position, you begin updating your resume. This is because you want to be sure to remember all of your accomplishments if and when you decide to make another career move, or if, for any reason, your employment is terminated (companies do close). Keep your resume updated all the time.

No tag lines

Lines such as “References available upon request,” are not necessary and just take up space. Leave them out. If you are asked for references or links to things during an interview, you can provide them at that time.

Do not abbreviate

The only abbreviation you can use is “U.S.” Otherwise, spell everything out. Even abbreviations for schools attended may not be known by employers. The rule for acronyms is the same; spell them out.

This article provides a good checklist for job seekers, whether they are crafting their first resumes ever or if they are veterans with several previous resumes under their belts. Sometimes, it’s the little things that can make a difference.

Need assistance with your resume for your job search? Get a free resume critique on College Recruiter. Also, come to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Kerry Creaswood, guest writer

Kerry Creaswood, guest writer

Kerry Creaswood is a young and ambitious writer from Savannah, Georgia. She is fond of various forms of art and thinks everything we can imagine is real. To find more about Kerry, check her Twitter.

Posted December 10, 2015 by

7 reasons to start learning PHP online

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Cindy Bates

Business owners nowadays generally recognize the critical role played by the World Wide Web in the success and failure of their businesses. They likewise see the importance of online business portals wherein they can showcase their products and services, and reach their target audience. For this reason, it is imperative and very relevant for business owners to make sure that their business websites utilize the latest platforms in web designing and language scripting for web development. Two of the most commonly used platforms for website designing are PHP and HTML. (more…)

Posted February 10, 2015 by

6 secrets to writing a great cover letter for a graduate

Pen was holding in hand ready to writing in note book.

Pen was holding in hand ready to writing in note book. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

At best, your cover letter can help you stand out from the crowd of job seekers, at worst it can present you as an anti-creative copy-paster. Unfortunately, the majority of cover letters read retreads of resumes with obvious repeats. Ask yourself a question: would you read one of these cover letters? Probably not, just as a vast majority of hiring managers.

Cover letters are very important for graduates as it is obvious that we don’t have much experience that’s why a cover letter is a chance to show our strong suits. Although, the Internet is bursting with cover letter ideas, the majority of ideas are either useless or too obvious like “use good grammar”. In this article we will go through the top 6 secrets to writing a great cover letter that will hopefully help you find a great job or an internship after graduating from university. (more…)

Posted July 30, 2014 by

Recent College Graduates, Want to Write Your Best Resumes for Jobs? Follow These 10 Steps

For recent college graduates looking to write their best resumes to help them get jobs, the following post includes an infographic with 10 steps for success.

There’s a ton of resume advice out there… most of it contradictory. As YouTern CEO Mark Babbitt says: “Advice on resumes is like snowflakes. It’s impossible to find two the same.” Which is why we love this infographic from YellowLineLabs.com! Here, you’ll see great advice – all told from the perspective of what your audience, the employer, wants

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Posted June 10, 2014 by

Writing a Resume to Find an Internship or a Job? 15 Tips You Can Apply

If you need some help writing your resume to find an internship or a job, check out these 15 tips in the following post.

For a large portion of my career, I’ve served as a hiring manager. In that role, I’ve reviewed an estimated five thousand resumes, perhaps more. I’ve hired sales people, tech experts, managers, marketing people and editors. While my experience may not be as extensive as some long-time HR professionals, odds are pretty good that I’ve

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Posted April 01, 2014 by

No Response When Emailing Your Resume for an Entry Level Job? 4 Reasons Why

So, you haven’t received any response when emailing your resume to apply for an entry level job.  The following post has four reasons why your resume may not be getting one.

If your resume delivery process is completely flawed, no one is going to read that shining gem of a resume in the first place. It’s like having a really great idea, but telling nobody about it, and then some other schmoe makes a million dollars because he knows a thing or two about basic

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Posted August 01, 2013 by

Grads, Want to be Creative? 4 Ways an Infographic Resume May Land You Recent Graduate Jobs

Graduates, if you’re trying to get your resume noticed by potential employers, perhaps a little creativity might do the trick.  Consider four ways to use an infographic resume to land recent graduate jobs in the following post.

Many questions come up while creating an infographic resume: Should you use a graph in line form or a pie chart? Should you put a big number right up near the top so everyone can see that important stat? Should you include company icons along with your job history? If you set

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4 Clever Ways to Use an Infographic Resume to Get Hired

Posted June 06, 2013 by

7 Online Resources to Help With Interviews for Recent Graduate Jobs

Whether you are someone looking for recent graduate jobs or otherwise, you should do research when preparing for an interview.  The following post has seven online resources to help you learn more about a potential employer.

You’ve identified your target employers, applied for your dream jobs and now you’re getting ready to knock their socks off in the interviews. Your performance in those interviews not only shows what a smart and thorough employee you would be; it also demonstrates your interest in each specific company. Use these online resources to prepare for your interviews and

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7 Online Resources That Will Help You Prepare for Your Next Job Interview

Posted December 11, 2012 by

4 Reasons Why Recruiters Want Your Resume in Word Format

CollegeRecruiter.comJob seekers, a quality resume won’t do you any good unless it is received by a recruiter or an employer in the right format.  The following post lists four reasons why the Word format should be used when submitting your resume.

Since Microsoft Office 2007 allows candidates the option to save files as PDF versions, I have noticed an increasing number of resumes in .PDF format. I’ve also noticed resumes that are scanned copies of a paper resume, often resulting in a .JPG or .PNG image file. Below are four key reasons to always send your resume as a Word document (.doc) to ensure you don’t unintentionally hinder your job search:

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4 Reasons Why Recruiters Want Your Resume in Word Format

Posted December 06, 2012 by

Creative Resumes: Are You Overdoing It?

CollegeRecruiter.comDo you want to add some visual appeal to your resume?  While this might be a good idea, there are some questions you should consider, according to the following post.

A creative resume is often a great option for job seekers to stand out. But if you’re not working in a creative field like graphic design or fashion, how do you know when your resume crosses the line from creative to distracting?  Creative resumes can vary in nature–for some job seekers, it may mean adding a cool border

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Creative Resumes: Are You Overdoing It?