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Posted February 29, 2016 by

10 reasons to reject job offers

Woman tears agreement documents before an agent who wants to get a signature courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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Deciding whether or not to accept job offers could be challenging for college students and recent graduates. When considering a position, there are certain factors that might lead students and grads to turn it down. Here are 10 good reasons to reject job offers.

1. Job seekers should reject job offers if they don’t line-up with their competencies, interests, and values. College students and recent graduates should ask themselves whether they’re good at what they’ll be expected to do if hired, if the work will excite them, and if the work is consistent with their morals. If not, pass on the offer. A job needs to be more than a paycheck.

2. The job doesn’t offer career advancement. Can employees grow within the company? If job offers do not mention anything about advancement, workers will be stuck in a job without the chance for a potential career.

3. Opportunities are sacrificed. Depending on the job, college students and recent graduates may or may not meet a people who have the right contacts. Without networking opportunities, they might miss out on their dream jobs.

4. Reputation is damaged professionally. There is no shame in working somewhere to make ends meet, even if it’s not the job you want. However, a bad work experience can damage one’s reputation with recruiters and hiring managers. Students and grads should find jobs highlighting their skills en route to better career opportunities.

5. The job affects your spirit negatively. College students and graduates need to think about how they would feel in the job. If it does not satisfy them for whatever reason, they will be unhappy and won’t perform well. This creates a negative spirit in people and in the workplace.

Balancing work and life, and busy businessman in concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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6. Hurts work/life balance. Work is important, but family is more important. If a new job will take too much time away from your loved ones, consider other options offering more flexibility for work/life balance.

7. Salary falls short. Students and grads should do their homework on how much money a job pays, and then compare the salary to the job offer. If the money isn’t what they’re quite hoping for and they believe they can get more, they shouldn’t accept the offer.

8. Money overtakes dreams. In contrast to the previous reason, the pay can be so good and becomes a bigger priority than pursuing your dreams. If students and graduates are tempted by money more than their dreams, they may regret accepting a new job later in life and wonder what could have been.

9. The hiring process isn’t structured. College students and recent grads should consider how they’re treated during the hiring process. Anything that seems questionable is a red flag and is not worth their time.

10. Bad timing. Even when great job offers come along, sometimes the timing isn’t right. While rejecting offers may seem crazy, don’t beat yourself up. A better offer could be waiting down the road.

Need more tips related to your job search? Follow our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube for career tips and motivation.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent grad deserves a great career. We work to create a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and grads to great careers.

Posted February 13, 2016 by

Balancing academics and work as a college student

Photo of Anthony Taylor

Anthony Taylor, guest writer

Students go off to college, but it’s not the rosy life they see in the movies. There are bills to pay, tuition to afford, books to buy, and honestly, balancing finances at a young age is hard. Studying in college and concentrating on getting good grades is tough enough without throwing in a job into the mix. But the money has to flow in to either support the family or to support getting an education. Whatever the reason, here are a few tips to help college students juggle their working and studying lives.

1. Find a job with flexible hours: Let’s face it; students are in college now. There will be coursework and assignments with tight deadlines, and studying should always be a priority. An education will serve as the building blocks for the future so students shouldn’t push it in the backburner. They should find jobs where they can easily accommodate their studies, too, so neither one suffers. These jobs could be within the college campus, as those kinds of jobs understand the balance between work and study, and they can help college students manage their homework.

2. Manage time wisely: With so much on the line, it is wise to have a good time management schedule. College students should know where they spend their time. Many successful people plan nearly each moment of their day to get the most out of their 24 hours. Many times we end up wasting time and not realizing it when we could be putting it to good use. Use lunch breaks to catch up on math homework, or grab a few hours of work during a long lunch break in college. Those few hours can add up during the week. Students need to keep checking in to see if they’re on track per their schedules to know they’re not overcommitting themselves or falling short of their goals. If students know they function better in the mornings, they should get evening jobs so they can do coursework or assignments when they’re fresh and vice versa.

3. Have family support: This goes without saying; without a support system, college students will find it very hard to adjust both lives alone. Students should inform their managers at work, friends, or family to support them in this decision, and help them both personally and professionally. This kind of support will help students infinitely when they feel the pressure is too much, or they need help with managing homework.

4. Know what they want: College students should choose jobs wisely if they can. Students should think about how what they do now could benefit them in the future. Remember, everything can be added to their portfolios. If working in a store, think of inventory – managing time and stock. All of this could and should be interpreted as work experience, and this could boost entry into the working world by gaining experience, references, professional growth, and of course, the money.

5. Be creative in getting homework done: By having a job, college students are effectively cutting down on their study hours. Students must be smart about juggling their time, and try listening to lectures while working. They should also keep their managers in the loop so they get that support system. This way, students can learn, revise, and perhaps even do homework during work hours, which don’t require much brain activity like sorting mail, etc.

6. Take a mental break: It is important to have some time out from studies. Always having studies/ homework on the mind will stress students out, especially if they know they can’t do it during work hours. Allow a study free zone while at work. Know there is nothing students can do about it, so they should give themselves permission to relax. Many times we block ourselves, and take on more stress over things we cannot control. Those moments students are not thinking about studies could benefit them in the long run. This way, they can approach their assignments with a fresh mind.

Smiling college students holding hands at graduation courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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7. Stay focused on the end goal: The end goal should be graduating. Many times, once students start working, they find it hard to stay focused on education. It becomes easy to forget about studies and think about short term benefits, such as getting paid. This spending power lets many people forget about graduating. College students must find ways to motivate themselves. Keep pictures of graduates at their ceremonies or photos of people who managed to reach the pinnacle of their careers to have an aim and a goal to reach.

8. Research on future courses: Students should find courses relevant to them and their future interests. Don’t choose a random course because friends are taking it, or because somebody else has a strong opinion about it. Students need to discover what they are passionate about and what they see themselves doing in the future. Doing some research on courses will help them achieve their future goals.

9. Be smart financially: Money can flow through college students’ fingers like water if they’re not careful. Keep track on spending and where the money has to be allocated. If there are bills to pay, keep that money aside, or pay off debts before doing anything else. This helps students become more financially independent. This not involves their weekly paycheck, but also their tuition. Most colleges have hefty fees so be sure to enroll in a program where there are future benefits. Don’t get a job and go into debt due to careless spending, as this will cause a downward spiral.

10. Be passionate: Happiness can only come from within. College students should be passionate about the courses they will be taking; passion will get them through tough times. If students truly do something they love, they will excel in it. Be happy at the workplace. Find a job that is mentally stimulating or has a good work team. This makes a huge difference in students’ mental health and happiness, and when they’re young and balancing their work and study lives, this is very important.

The balance for managing studies and work can be a fine line, and one that should be carefully monitored so college students don’t end up suffering by their decision to work. This has become a recent trend, as many young students have bills to pay, and this enables them to gain work experience while also getting homework help and inspiration from their coworkers or family.

Need more tips for college students, check out College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Anthony Taylor is a writer, student and editor on student’s writing website. He loves reading, writing motivational stories and spending the time with his family. You can follow him on Twitter and Google+ for more interesting stories.

Posted July 16, 2015 by

The Millennial Makeover Part 4: What Attracts Them to Your Company

Millennial Employees words on a worker or staff member on an organizational chart to illustrate finding and hiring young people

Millennial Employees words on a worker or staff member on an organizational chart to illustrate finding and hiring young people. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

When it comes to today’s workforce, there is no doubt that millennials are creating an atmosphere of change in the workplace.  So, who are millennials?  This group was born between 1980 and the year 2000, and reflect a generation with their own career goals, attitudes, and oh yes, their understanding of how to use technology.  For employers to take their companies to the next level, they will need to find ways to recruit and retain millennials, also known as Generation Y. (more…)

Posted June 09, 2015 by

Finance Majors: You’re the Next Big Thing

Accountant calculating finances. Over the shoulder view

Accountant calculating finances. Over the shoulder view. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Jobs in finance are on the rise, and finance majors can look forward to a career full of diverse challenges and options. By 2022, financial management careers are expected to grow by 14 percent, financial analyst careers by 23 percent and careers in financial advisement by 32 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Here’s a look at some of the reasons why this field is one of the most exciting out there today. (more…)

Posted August 01, 2014 by

Jobs That Sound Boring But That Are Anything But!

Female nurse at nurses station

Female nurse at nurses station. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

It is unlikely that, when you were little and dreaming about your future, you dreamt of a job at a desk or in a cubicle. You probably dreamed of being a sports star, Hollywood A-lister, astronaut, fire fighter, stunt car driver, zookeeper, President—anything but something that would tie you to a desk or an office all day.

As we get older most of us resign ourselves to the idea of a desk-tied job. We discover that we want something steadier and less risky. We want the fattest paycheck possible and plan to save our excitement and happiness for the evenings, weekends and occasional vacation. What we fail to predict is just how satisfying some of those boring sounding jobs can be.

Here are some of the most satisfying (and stable!) careers you should pursue after college. (more…)

Posted July 15, 2014 by

What it takes to Stay Motivated and Boost Your Career

Group of working people

Group of working people. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

An individual is often judged by the job they hold. A person should work hard in order to maximize their potential and enjoyment in their career.

There are plenty of people who are working at a job they either do not like or do not think is the best fit for them. They may not be happy with the amount of money they make or the amount of power they hold in their job. There are two choices people in this situation have. They can choose to do nothing and complain about it for their rest of their lives, or they can choose to find ways to maximize their potential in the career choice they have made. The second choice might be more difficult, but it may be the wiser path. (more…)

Posted June 11, 2014 by

College Students, Choose Your Major Carefully to Improve Your Chances of Landing Entry Level Jobs

Depending on the majors they choose, college students may have an easier or more difficult time finding entry level jobs.  In the following post, take a look at the best and worst college majors for summer 2014.

So much goes into choosing a major. Our passions and aptitudes, input from parents and mentors, and career options once you’ve earned that degree such as: Which majors do employers look for most? For my career choice, will it be difficult to find a job? Within my career field, where are

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Posted May 28, 2014 by

New to Searching for Recent Graduate Jobs? Avoid Hurting Yourself by Making These 9 Mistakes

For new grads entering the workforce, keep in mind that any little flaw can cost you in your search for recent graduate jobs.  In the following post, learn nine mistakes to avoid so that you don’t hurt your employment chances.

Your first “real” job search (as a newly-minted young professional) is quite a learning experience. So many options; so little time! You can’t wait to hear those magic words: “You’re hired”. You don’t want to make job search mistakes that will extend your job search. But, you may not be clear on exactly what to

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Posted May 15, 2014 by

Don’t Like Your Entry Level Job and Want to Run Your Own Business? What You Can Learn from Your Current Job for the Future

Even though your entry level job may not be the career you’re really interested in, it can teach you some skills if you want to run your own business in the future.  In the following post, find out what skills in your job can benefit you down the road as an entrepreneur.

For many side hustlers and wannabe entrepreneurs, “the day job” can seem like the enemy. Sure, it’s a paycheck, and that can be a helpful safety net while you’re trying to grow your own business. But it’s often little more than that. You slog through it, biding your time until

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Posted March 13, 2014 by

Considering Freelancing Jobs for Recent College Graduates? What You Should Think About

For those of you considering freelancing jobs for recent college graduates, the following post shares some things to think about before making this decision.

Ready to jump from your 9-to-5 to full-time freelancing? Great! From making your own hours to setting your own fees, freelancing has tons of benefits. But what many startup ‘lancers don’t know is that freelancing can also be costly. You are, after all, essentially starting a business. Plus, you’re moving from steady paychecks to the unknown territory of

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