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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

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Posted March 15, 2019 by

Are diversity and inclusion hiring efforts undermined by the shift to programmatic, CPC job advertising?

Over the past couple of years, College Recruiter has undergone a remarkable transformation. As was the case since the dawn of recruitment advertising a few hundred years ago, all of our employer customers were advertising their part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level job opportunities with us on a traditional, duration-basis such as $X for 30-days.

Today, virtually all of the postings on our site are pay-for-performance such as cost-per-click and most of those are programmatic, meaning that the jobs we receive and the CPC we receive are based upon pre-set rules created by the employer customers, their advertising agencies, or their job distributors. Hopefully, that quick overview helps to illustrate why I wrote above that our people, process, product, and price have undergone a remarkable transformation.

I thought that readers of this blog would appreciate a little information about what we’re seeing happening in the marketplace right now. Some of the traditional, ad agencies are doing a good job in terms of advising their customers as to what CPC’s to pay, what jobs to distribute, expectations, etc. Some aren’t.

A common theme across almost all ad agencies — but not all — is that the overriding metric of success is minimizing the CPC and/or eCPA. I understand the desire to use objective metrics like that, but I’m also hearing frustration from some on the employer side who are appreciating their reduced costs per and time to hire but concerned about the negative impact these programs are having on their diversity and inclusion hiring efforts and, therefore, the long-term productivity of their workforce. 

What a small number of employers and advertising agencies are starting to appreciate is that the lowest CPC and lowest eCPA typically translates into a higher percentage of candidates coming from a smaller percentage of sources, which reduces the diversity of the applicant pool. Note that when I talk about diversity, I’m not just talking about race or gender. I’m also talking about socioeconomic and other such backgrounds. If a disproportionately large number of applicants come from low cost, general aggregators, then the candidate pool will also be general and therefore anything but diverse.

A couple of the ad agencies we work with are segmenting their budgets so they allocate $A to general aggregators; $B to industry-specific, niche sites; $C to geographic-specific, niche sites; $D to college-specific sites; etc. Within each of those groups, they use CPC and eCPA as measures of success, but they don’t expect or need the CPC or eCPA for the niche sites to be as low as those from the aggregator sites.

From what we can see on our end, most of the job exports from the advertising agencies are being managed to minimize CPC and eCPA instead of the more nuanced approach that we’re starting to see from a small number of other, more cutting edge ad agencies whose clients value a diverse and inclusive candidate pool so much that they’re willing to pay for it. Talk can be cheap, but these ad agencies and their customers aren’t just talking the talk, but they’re also walking the walk.

Posted October 11, 2018 by

College Recruiter providing high CPC, original backfill to publishers who primarily target students, recent grads

Almost since job boards existed, they’ve partnered together to share job content. One job board may have an excess number of candidate traffic in one area while a second may have an excess number of job posting ads in the same area. A real win-win can be created if the first sends its candidates to the second in return for a share of the revenue the second receives from its employer customer.

Unfortunately for the publisher — the site with excess candidate traffic — these backfill deals often took on the form of API calls, meaning that all of the jobs from the advertiser — the site with excess demand from employers — appeared at the bottom of the publisher’s search results. The publisher may have five jobs that match the interests of the candidate but their search results page would end up showing those five jobs plus hundreds of others from the advertiser.

Even worse was that the advertiser’s brand was typically adjacent to the jobs and the candidate would be sent to the advertiser’s site to register and, perhaps, apply to the job. To the candidate, the experience was searching for a job on the first job board, finding a potential match on the search results page, clicking, and going to a second job board. That created, at best, confusion for many job seekers. Were they at the employer’s site? Why were they being asked to register again? Was registering the same as applying? (more…)

Posted July 27, 2017 by

Fall 2017 college recruitment trends and challenges [white paper]

 

As the 2017-18 school year creeps up, recruiters are looking at their plans, and wondering what to keep from last year and what to change. College Recruiter teamed up with our friends at NAS Recruitment Innovation to create a white paper chock full of insight into trends and offer advice for talent acquisition teams with a high volume of entry-level hiring needs this fall. (more…)

Posted June 26, 2017 by

Archived white papers from College Recruiter

College Recruiter regularly produces white papers that address challenges to the talent acquisition community and in human resource planning, especially professionals hiring entry-level. Below you’ll find our archives. Enjoy!

Gen Z talentGen Z Talent: Understand them to recruit them. All of your college recruitment, from now until 2033, will be tapping Gen Z talent. To say that Gen Z will change the workforce is an understatement. This white paper gives concrete tips for recruiters, TA and HR leaders who related to sourcing, equity, benefits, branding and more–to help attract Gen Z candidates.

 

 

Tweak your summer internshipHow you should tweak your summer internship program: Learn from real-time feedback this spring. Recruiters have been warming up summer intern candidates. There are several things they can listen form, and communicate back, to increase your hiring success. This guide touches on new intern regulations, Gen Z, candidate communication, branding and the single most important factor in delivering a great internship.

 

 

Recruiting can’t be strategic until it shifts to a marketing approach: Here’s how. There is little doubt among strategic recruiting leaders that recruiting must become more like corporate marketing. Marketing receives much stronger executive support and more funding than recruiting. This is because marketing emphasizes data-driven decision-making, market segmentation, powerful branding and being customer-centric. This white paper discusses seven important approaches recruiting should consider borrowing from marketing.

Candidate experience

Making or breaking the entry-level candidate experience: Turning common mistakes into opportunities. Disengage your candidates, and you shrink the pool you have to fish in. Qualified candidates who drop out in the process cost money. Like all of us, candidates have grown to expect great experiences. We teamed up with our friends at TMP Worldwide to create a white paper that will guide in turning common mistakes in the recruitment and selection process, and turn them into opportunities.

Fall college recruitment plansFall 2017 College Recruitment: Emerging trends and challenges. As the school year creeps up, recruiters are looking at their plans, and wondering what to keep from last year and what to change. NAS Recruitment Innovation and College Recruiter teamed up to provide insight into trends and offer advice for talent acquisition teams with a high volume of entry-level hiring needs. We touch on applied tech skills, programmatic advertising, what students are looking for, diversity and much more.

talent war means making happy teamsWinning the talent acquisition war in 2017: There has been a shift in tools and techniques used by employers to attract talent in light of advances in technology and business needs. An effective recruitment strategy should not only align with workforce plans, but also attract top performers. Employers need to respond to key trends when it comes to acquiring talent. This white paper addresses diversifying the workforce, use of analytics, hiring millennials, leveraging mobile technology and responding to the gig economy.

Predictive analytics and interview biasPredictive analytics, bias and interviewing: For centuries, crystal ball gazers and fortune tellers promised to be able to predict the future. They played on our biases and gullibility, and counted on us attributing chance occurrences to their predictive powers. But predictive analytics gives us the ability to reduce uncertainty by applying statistics and determining the probabilities that future patterns will emerge in the behavior of people and systems. This white paper addresses privacy invasion, biases that impede truth, and what to do about bias.

Finding game changer talentDon’t pass on game changer candidates who are still rookies: Game changers are high-impact hires who, soon after joining a team, end up completely transforming it. They quickly move beyond being just top performers because they can be further described using words like stunning, remarkable, exceptional, or extraordinary. Unfortunately, I frequently see recruiters and hiring managers pass over these extraordinary rookies. This white paper addresses identifying rookie game changer candidates.

Evaluate sources effectivelyHow employers evaluate career services, job boards and other sources (And how mobile recruiting changes everything): When College Recruiter began using technology to track candidates who clicked “apply” in 1998, within months, one of the world’s largest hospitality companies was paying us $0.05 per click to drive thousands of students and grads to their career site. And yet today, few employers seem to properly track the sources of candidates who visit their career sites, let alone those who apply, are interviewed and get hired. This white paper addresses flawed assumptions about evaluating sources, and the solution.

 

Posted March 15, 2017 by

Programmatic advertising in recruitment: start paying attention

 

Programmatic advertising is alive and well in the present. However, many recruiters still think of it as a future strategy. Programmatic advertising will account for 50% of all digital ad sales by 2018, if not even sooner. That is only a year from now, so if you’re still not putting dollars into this method of recruitment, you should start paying attention. Despite this rapid scalability of programmatic advertising, it’s been slow to adapt to the recruiting and entry-level hiring space. Here we will explore how this new technology will look in the recruitment space. (more…)

Posted July 25, 2016 by

10 digital skills to help you land an amazing job

Young photographer at the studio doing some retouching photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

The digital age arrives with many benefits. Our lives are faster, online, and the information is easily accessible at the click of a button. However, you cannot be left behind, and you need to keep up with technology because it might end up replacing you if you don’t. In fact, it’s already happening. Many jobs that have been a staple of society in the past 100 years are slowly being given to automatons.

Those are the jobs that require little social interaction and are based on pure demand or logical thinking. A human employee in simple services can be replaced by a few buttons. We’re moving forward, and many already believe that the younger generation needs to make sure their digital skills are sharp in order to fit into the future. How do you defeat this robotization of services and jobs? Learn to be the one who controls and creates them.

It does not mean you necessarily have to learn how to build robots, but it means that you need to understand what sort of skills and talents future employees expect from you. Digital skills are certainly among them because they will play a major role in shaping the future. Your concern should be to belong among those who participate, instead of those who just watch, and here’s what you should definitely know to land a great job.

1. SEO (Search Engine Optimization)

Even though SEO has been around for quite a while, it’s not known to many who have had no handle in creating or taking care of a website. However, keep in mind that skills using it are required by around 14% of companies in the digital industry, and that number is expected to grow. It’s an essential tool used to optimize a website in order for it to generate traffic and conversation. It’s an imperative skill for many jobs and one that will definitely impress employers in the industry.

2. Coding (HTML5 or JavaScript)

It may sound like a no-brainer, but coding is a major part of web browsing, especially in an age where websites are becoming more interactive. Numerous tech giants have switched to HTML5, dropping previous languages in order to create a better and seamless internet experience. The same applies to JavaScript, which works greatest with animation and making interaction an easy process. They’re tools that will be used in the future and some highly recommended for those interested in the field.

3. PPC (Pay-Per-Click)

In essence, it’s a very simple method that companies are looking for regarding marketing. It implies increasing a specific website’s traffic by buying ads on search engines that make potential customers click on it. However, you need to hone your skills in identifying promising keywords, creating a compelling ad, and measure the results. These will be excellent skills to have if you’re aiming to submit a winning job application at a tech titan in the industry.

4. Analytics

It’s not enough to implement digital strategies. Analytics are crucial and highly sought-after by employers because it means you are comfortable with analyzing and evaluating how those techniques are progressing. You need to be able to compare them constantly with others and provide excellent insight. It’s an incredible skill that will certainly land you a job. Everyone is looking to get better.

5. Android or iOS Development

Smartphones are taking over, and learning either one of these two platforms will look great on your resume. They have tremendous potential for the future because they are not going anywhere. You could find an amazing job if you master at least one of them.

6. PaaS (Platform as a Service)

Cloud software is everywhere, and many believe that they will ultimately become the quintessential platform for companies. PaaS is a tool that will help you develop these web applications that will no longer require customers to download sizeable programs on their hard drives. It’s a builder of accessibility.

7. Personal branding

Through the use of social media, you can create an excellent personal brand that will land you a fantastic job. You only need to learn how to do it. It implies understanding the use of all social media platforms, including Facebook, LinkedIn, websites, blogs, and everything else to create a beneficial image of yourself.

8. Writing online content

Everything is on the internet, and the ability to create quality content is highly sought-after. If you combine it with SEO and a few marketing skills, you could reach for a high-paying digital marketing job. It’s important to know how to flow between platforms, and manage your content for every situation.

9. Web design and creating websites

There are numerous tools out there to use, and mastering a majority of them will certainly make you desired on the job market. All you need is a bit of coding, tremendous amounts of creativity, and the patience to actually learn all the tools. Everyone and everything needs a website. Be the one who creates them, and you will be needed as well.

10. Image and video editing

Online digital media is in full force, so there will always be a need for someone who has extensive skills of image and video editing. Be it for advertising, marketing, or basically any industry, these are very valuable skills to learn. They look impressive on your resume, and every company needs someone with these abilities. If you truly want to impress them, grab the Adobe collection and master it.

We have moved fast into the future, and our steps need to be quick in order to keep up. Basic knowledge of Microsoft Office is now not something employers require, but something they expect. Focus on the most advanced tools that will set you apart from the crowd of millennials still stuck behind technology.

Want more information about how to integrate technology into your career? Visit our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Amanda Wilks, guest writer

Amanda Wilks, guest writer

Amanda Wilks is a digital marketing intern and a part-time writer, passionate about social media and personal branding. She loves helping individuals create unique online identities and achieve their much-desired professional acclaim.

Posted April 22, 2016 by

TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo: Doing better deals

The Association for Talent Acquisition Solutions (TATech) will host a fall conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, on September 19-21, 2016. Peter Weddle, CEO of TATech, is excited to announce the conference and share information about the conference’s scope, purpose, and agenda with viewers in this video hosted by Bethany Wallace, Content Manager of College Recruiter. Bethany interviews Peter and Steven Rothberg, President and Founder of College Recruiter, who will present a session for talent acquisition leaders at the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Peter Weddle explains that TATech is the global trade association for the talent acquisition solutions industry. It represents the for-profit enterprises and not-for-profit organizations that provide technology-based products and services for talent acquisition professionals, from applicant tracking system companies, job boards, and social media sites to mobile apps, recruitment advertising agencies, and cloud-based recruitment marketing platforms. Collectively, its members power or operate over 60,000 sites worldwide and provide state-of-the-art solutions services for virtually every facet of talent acquisition.

The purpose of the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo is to provide cross-talk and information sharing between recruiters/talent acquisition professionals and vendors who provide products and services for talent acquisition professionals. Peter Weddle believes there is a lack of communication and interaction between these two groups of professionals, and that enabling employers and recruiters to get the information they need from their vendors will help them improve their return on investment.

Steven Rothberg, President of College Recruiter, hopes to help talent acquisition leaders improve their return on investment when working with vendors, too, and that is the scope of his presentation entitled, “Doing better deals: How to be a smart consumer of talent acquisition solutions.” In the past, many employers simply posted jobs and assumed the risk; either the jobs would perform well or not. However, with the solutions available to employers now via technology, employers should do their homework and understand the estimated return on investment associated with various types of advertising (banner advertising, email campaigns, pay per click, etc.).

Steven will cover this information in his presentation and believes it will empower talent acquisition professionals to make informed decisions regarding their college recruiting budgets. It will also help employers to negotiate better deals and to make cost comparisons between proposals from different vendors. He emphasizes that employers should negotiate with vendors and provide justification using metrics and pricing information using this type of cost comparison information.

Peter Weddle emphasizes the value of attending a conference like the TATech 2016 Fall Conference & Expo; there isn’t always an opportunity to visit face-to-face with owners of organizations like College Recruiter. In addition, TATech is offering free hotel accommodations at The Palms to those who register for the conference by June 15, 2016. Lastly, Peter mentions that the conference is truly a fun experience, featuring the 2016 Recruiting Service Innovation Awards (the ReSIs). Modeled after the Oscars, the awards are a red carpet, black tie optional celebration.

Be sure to follow our blog for more information about upcoming conferences and events for recruiters and talent acquisition professionals. Subscribe to our YouTube channel, and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

 

 

 

Posted January 27, 2011 by

83% of Candidates Incorrectly Self-Identify Their Referral Source

There’s been a significant increase in the number of employer clients would prefer to pay for postings and other recruitment advertising on a for performance basis so that they only pay if they hire someone from the ad. I’d love to get there as well as it would ensure that the interests of the candidate, employer, and CollegeRecruiter.com would be well aligned but we can’t get there until the employers make the proper investments in their applicant tracking systems.

Don Firth of JobsInLogistics, AllRetailJobs, and TopUSAJobsOf the hundreds of clients we have, we’d be hard pressed to count on one hand how many of them are properly tracking the source of their hires. It is really pathetic, actually. We have one client who spend $200,000 on an applicant tracking system but didn’t spend $20,000 to add the module that would give them fully automated tracking with unique URLs. So instead they have those horrid drop-down boxes. Don Firth at AllRetailJobs.com and JobsInLogistics.com published a study showing that 83 percent of candidates misidentified their source when they clicked directly from the job board to the employer site and the job board was actually listed.

I can only imagine how much higher the percentage would be if the study included candidates who saw the posting on sites to which it was crossposted. For example, if an employer posts a job to our site then we crosspost it to thousands of other sites in our network. It is part of our selling proposition so there’s full transparency with our clients. If a candidate sees the posting on one of our partner sites and then applies on the employer site, will the candidate know to identify CollegeRecruiter.com? No way.

The only solution is fully automated tracking where the employer provides a unique URL to every board and other source to which they post the opportunity. Then regardless of where the candidate sees the posting the source will be properly tracked. Of course, that assumes that the ATS is setup to properly track those URLs and that the HR people using the ATS are properly trained on how to make that work.

We’re talking with a client right now about a pay-per-hire deal. We are confident that the client is properly tracking. We’d welcome more such deals as they’re great for all concerned, but I suspect that we’ll get a lot of interest from employers whose systems don’t measure up to their desires.

Originally posted by Steven Rothberg