ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 05, 2018 by

Salary disclosure and the new climate: Tips for recruiters to make informed hiring decisions

 

Wages for women and minorities still lag behind their White male counterparts. Consequently, equal pay regulations have gained traction quickly in the last few years. The intent of the legislation, focused around salary disclosure, is to close the stubborn pay gap. Recruiters may be losing one tool in their toolbox but they can still perform their jobs well. 

Last year, eight states, cities, or localities made it illegal for employers to ask for salary history. At the end of 2017, more than a dozen pay equity laws were under review. Many HR experts anticipate this trend will continue. To get ahead of the curve, your HR team should review your strategy. (more…)

Posted July 19, 2017 by

[video] Effective negotiation skills: Discussing salary and benefits Part 2

 

Learning effective negotiation skills is not difficult, but you have to know what to ask for and when to ask. College Recruiter spoke with Marky Stein, a well recognized expert in career counseling, who gives her advice here for entry level job seekers about negotiating salary and benefits. 

Stein is a member of College Recruiter’s  Panel of Experts, who consults Fortune 500 companies, presents at colleges and universities about career development, and is a bestselling author of career planning books.  This is Part 2 of 2 of our conversation with Stein. Here she addresses the gender pay gap and advises when to ask for a pay raise. In part 1 of our conversation, Stein provided tips for what to expect, how to prepare for negotiating and ideas for what to negotiate (more…)

Businessmen Shaking Hands

Posted July 07, 2017 by

[video] How to negotiate offers: tips for discussing salary and benefits Part 1

 

Negotiating offers by discussing salary and benefits can be intimidating for an entry level job seeker. If you haven’t done your research, you won’t know what to ask for. When you are given a job offer, that is the moment when you have the most leverage to negotiate, so make sure you are prepared so you don’t miss the opportunity.

College Recruiter spoke with Marky Stein, who consults Fortune 500 companies, presents at colleges and universities about career development, and is a bestselling author of career planning books. This is Part 1 of 2 of our conversation with Marky to hear her advice for entry level job seekers about negotiating salary and benefits. Here she provides tips for what to expect, how to prepare for negotiating and ideas for what to negotiate. Part 2 will continue the conversation and will address the gender pay gap and when to ask for a pay raise. (more…)

Posted July 06, 2017 by

[Video and infographic] Preparing for an engineering interview: Insight from Intel for female students and grads

 

How are you supposed to know how to stand out from other engineering candidates? College Recruiter spoke with Jeff Dunn, Campus Relations Manager for Intel Corporation. He shared his advice regarding preparing for an interview, specifically for female engineer students who need tips in getting noticed in the STEM fields. Jeff is passionate about preparing students and grads for their career so his advice should be relevant to all kinds of job seekers. This is part 2 of 2 of our conversation. Last time we checked in with Jeff, he shared tips for engineering students who are preparing their resume.

Jeff is a member of College Recruiter’s Panel of Experts, which is a group of professional around the country that regularly provide top notch advice for both talent acquisition professionals and entry level job seekers. (more…)

Posted January 04, 2017 by

Women managers: discrepancies begin at first chance of promotion

 

“Women are less likely to receive the first critical promotion to manager—so far fewer end up on the path to leadership—and are less likely to be hired into more senior positions.”

That ton of bricks comes from the Women in the Workplace report, released last fall by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company. What is getting in women’s ways? Does bias against women managers tell the whole tale? Or is something else going on?

That women fall behind so early in their careers should be a wake-up call to female college students. Seniors, who will be entering the workplace soon, should especially take notice. For years, young women have made up more than half of the college student population (and as high as 60% at private schools). The Pew Research Center reports that 71% of recent female high school grads turn their ambition to college. Compare that to 61% of recent male high school grads. Once they’re in college, women continue to outperform men. They earn better grades and graduate with more honors than men. It would be easy for today’s driven, hard-working young women to believe that inequality is something only their mothers had to deal with. Unfortunately, the real world is different than college.

“There are multiple factors that contribute to entry-level women being behind men at first chance of promotion,” says Simma Lieberman at The Inclusionist.

Many women need a boost in confidence

“Many women have internalized messages from media and have bought into other people’s bias about women’s abilities and careers,” says Lieberman. “They have not learned to negotiate or ask for what they want. I’m still surprised by how many women still believe that by working “hard” they will be discovered, that it’s not okay to promote yourself to managers, and they have to “wait their turn” to get promoted.”

You can’t take rejection personally

If an employer hires someone else, women need to stop seeing this rejection as personal and permanent. Liebrman continues, “Women need to learn how to separate getting turned down for a promotion or not being chosen for a project, from other parts of their life. There is a tendency to give up after one try which holds them back, rather than find out why they didn’t get a promotion and to let that cloud their ambitions and settle.”

Bias still exists

Women in the Workplace finds real biases out there. Women may need to work on their negotiation skills, but that doesn’t explain the whole pay gap. The report finds that “Women who negotiate for a promotion or compensation increase are 30% more likely than men who negotiate to receive feedback that they are ‘bossy,’ ‘too aggressive,’ or ‘intimidating.'” Our implicit biases persuade us to believe that men are more suited for leadership. That first promotion to manager is just the beginning. The STEM fields are especially male-dominated, which can make it particularly challenging for women to be taken seriously.

It’s hard to blame young women who ask why they should be the ones to change. Lieberman advises women to be “flexible and develop tools to show their talent and be recognized. Lack of confidence is not a trait that should be continued.” Women who want to become managers should be aware of how the cards are stacked, seek advice from senior women, and keep working hard.