ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted April 23, 2019 by

There isn’t a shortage of talent. There’s a shortage of well-qualified talent finding your jobs.

For many employers, this is an incredibly frustrating labor market. Technology has made it easier than ever for candidates to apply to jobs so employers typically say that quantity isn’t their issue but quality is. But why?

College Recruiter believes that every student and recent graduate deserves a great career. Our customers are primarily Fortune 1,000 companies, federal government agencies, and other organizations who want to hire dozens or even hundreds of students and recent graduates of all one-, two-, and four-year colleges and universities for part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level jobs.

How is College Recruiter able to help so many of the largest and well-known employers in the country hire so many great candidates? A lot of reasons, but a key one is that we license the world’s best search technology — Google’s — to match up candidates who know what kind of a job they’re looking for but might not guess at the job title or other keywords that your organization uses in its ads. Most job boards use dumb search technology, so if an employer posts a job using RN for the job title and the candidate searches for registered nurse positions, they’ll be like two ships passing in the night. But College Recruiter will match that employer with that candidate. 

We’ll also prioritize the search results based upon a bunch of factors, including how motivated that employer is to hire that candidate (those who want to hire more or faster rank higher so they get more well-qualified candidates faster) and even how long it will take the candidate to get to the job whether they want to commute by walking, bicycling, transit, or driving. Try telling a college career service office website that you only want to look at jobs within 15-minutes walking distance from campus. 

Oh, and we fully automate the process of adding, editing, and deactivating your postings without you having to lift a finger. Heck, you don’t even have to create an account on our site.

In short, College Recruiter is built from the ground-up with the needs of large employers in mind. You’re not trying to hire one, unique candidate. You don’t have all of the time in the world like some SMB’s do. We get that. Want some proof? Let’s set up a 30-minute call to talk through your hiring challenges or email those to me. Either way, I’ll make specific recommendations to you for how we can help.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Posted March 15, 2019 by

Are diversity and inclusion hiring efforts undermined by the shift to programmatic, CPC job advertising?

Over the past couple of years, College Recruiter has undergone a remarkable transformation. As was the case since the dawn of recruitment advertising a few hundred years ago, all of our employer customers were advertising their part-time, seasonal, internship, and entry-level job opportunities with us on a traditional, duration-basis such as $X for 30-days.

Today, virtually all of the postings on our site are pay-for-performance such as cost-per-click and most of those are programmatic, meaning that the jobs we receive and the CPC we receive are based upon pre-set rules created by the employer customers, their advertising agencies, or their job distributors. Hopefully, that quick overview helps to illustrate why I wrote above that our people, process, product, and price have undergone a remarkable transformation.

I thought that readers of this blog would appreciate a little information about what we’re seeing happening in the marketplace right now. Some of the traditional, ad agencies are doing a good job in terms of advising their customers as to what CPC’s to pay, what jobs to distribute, expectations, etc. Some aren’t.

A common theme across almost all ad agencies — but not all — is that the overriding metric of success is minimizing the CPC and/or eCPA. I understand the desire to use objective metrics like that, but I’m also hearing frustration from some on the employer side who are appreciating their reduced costs per and time to hire but concerned about the negative impact these programs are having on their diversity and inclusion hiring efforts and, therefore, the long-term productivity of their workforce. 

What a small number of employers and advertising agencies are starting to appreciate is that the lowest CPC and lowest eCPA typically translates into a higher percentage of candidates coming from a smaller percentage of sources, which reduces the diversity of the applicant pool. Note that when I talk about diversity, I’m not just talking about race or gender. I’m also talking about socioeconomic and other such backgrounds. If a disproportionately large number of applicants come from low cost, general aggregators, then the candidate pool will also be general and therefore anything but diverse.

A couple of the ad agencies we work with are segmenting their budgets so they allocate $A to general aggregators; $B to industry-specific, niche sites; $C to geographic-specific, niche sites; $D to college-specific sites; etc. Within each of those groups, they use CPC and eCPA as measures of success, but they don’t expect or need the CPC or eCPA for the niche sites to be as low as those from the aggregator sites.

From what we can see on our end, most of the job exports from the advertising agencies are being managed to minimize CPC and eCPA instead of the more nuanced approach that we’re starting to see from a small number of other, more cutting edge ad agencies whose clients value a diverse and inclusive candidate pool so much that they’re willing to pay for it. Talk can be cheap, but these ad agencies and their customers aren’t just talking the talk, but they’re also walking the walk.

Posted April 03, 2018 by

Successful variable pay programs: Interview with John Rubino

 

Variable pay programs are rising in popularity. John Rubino, president and founder of Rubino Consulting Services (RCS), knows a lot about this trend and how employers are currently succeeding (and failing) at implementing variable pay programs. Rubino will be a speaker at SHRM 2018 conference, presenting “Successful Variable Pay Programs in Action: A Case Study Using a Proven Eight-Step Design Approach.” I connected with Rubino to get his insight into how to ensure success, what mistakes to avoid, and what it has to do with engaging entry-level employees.  (more…)

Posted March 13, 2018 by

Changing priorities at College Recruiter to help employers hire at scale

 

Recently, someone asked me what College Recruiter’s priorities were five years ago, versus our priorities today. And if they changed, why?

Five years ago, we were all still emerging from the Great Recession. The economy was unstable. No one really knew if we were about to plunge back into a recession or if we were in the early stages of a long, slow, and unsteady recovery. Fortunately, the latter was the case. At College Recruiter, revenues and profits were increasing and we were looking to the next three, four, even five years and making strategic decisions.  (more…)

Posted June 26, 2017 by

Archived white papers from College Recruiter

College Recruiter regularly produces white papers that address challenges to the talent acquisition community and in human resource planning, especially professionals hiring entry-level. Below you’ll find our archives. Enjoy!

Gen Z talentGen Z Talent: Understand them to recruit them. All of your college recruitment, from now until 2033, will be tapping Gen Z talent. To say that Gen Z will change the workforce is an understatement. This white paper gives concrete tips for recruiters, TA and HR leaders who related to sourcing, equity, benefits, branding and more–to help attract Gen Z candidates.

 

 

Tweak your summer internshipHow you should tweak your summer internship program: Learn from real-time feedback this spring. Recruiters have been warming up summer intern candidates. There are several things they can listen form, and communicate back, to increase your hiring success. This guide touches on new intern regulations, Gen Z, candidate communication, branding and the single most important factor in delivering a great internship.

 

 

Recruiting can’t be strategic until it shifts to a marketing approach: Here’s how. There is little doubt among strategic recruiting leaders that recruiting must become more like corporate marketing. Marketing receives much stronger executive support and more funding than recruiting. This is because marketing emphasizes data-driven decision-making, market segmentation, powerful branding and being customer-centric. This white paper discusses seven important approaches recruiting should consider borrowing from marketing.

Candidate experience

Making or breaking the entry-level candidate experience: Turning common mistakes into opportunities. Disengage your candidates, and you shrink the pool you have to fish in. Qualified candidates who drop out in the process cost money. Like all of us, candidates have grown to expect great experiences. We teamed up with our friends at TMP Worldwide to create a white paper that will guide in turning common mistakes in the recruitment and selection process, and turn them into opportunities.

Fall college recruitment plansFall 2017 College Recruitment: Emerging trends and challenges. As the school year creeps up, recruiters are looking at their plans, and wondering what to keep from last year and what to change. NAS Recruitment Innovation and College Recruiter teamed up to provide insight into trends and offer advice for talent acquisition teams with a high volume of entry-level hiring needs. We touch on applied tech skills, programmatic advertising, what students are looking for, diversity and much more.

talent war means making happy teamsWinning the talent acquisition war in 2017: There has been a shift in tools and techniques used by employers to attract talent in light of advances in technology and business needs. An effective recruitment strategy should not only align with workforce plans, but also attract top performers. Employers need to respond to key trends when it comes to acquiring talent. This white paper addresses diversifying the workforce, use of analytics, hiring millennials, leveraging mobile technology and responding to the gig economy.

Predictive analytics and interview biasPredictive analytics, bias and interviewing: For centuries, crystal ball gazers and fortune tellers promised to be able to predict the future. They played on our biases and gullibility, and counted on us attributing chance occurrences to their predictive powers. But predictive analytics gives us the ability to reduce uncertainty by applying statistics and determining the probabilities that future patterns will emerge in the behavior of people and systems. This white paper addresses privacy invasion, biases that impede truth, and what to do about bias.

Finding game changer talentDon’t pass on game changer candidates who are still rookies: Game changers are high-impact hires who, soon after joining a team, end up completely transforming it. They quickly move beyond being just top performers because they can be further described using words like stunning, remarkable, exceptional, or extraordinary. Unfortunately, I frequently see recruiters and hiring managers pass over these extraordinary rookies. This white paper addresses identifying rookie game changer candidates.

Evaluate sources effectivelyHow employers evaluate career services, job boards and other sources (And how mobile recruiting changes everything): When College Recruiter began using technology to track candidates who clicked “apply” in 1998, within months, one of the world’s largest hospitality companies was paying us $0.05 per click to drive thousands of students and grads to their career site. And yet today, few employers seem to properly track the sources of candidates who visit their career sites, let alone those who apply, are interviewed and get hired. This white paper addresses flawed assumptions about evaluating sources, and the solution.