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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted March 24, 2016 by

Selecting schools for college recruiting

When selecting colleges and universities to recruit from, employers must consider a variety of factors.  This article and accompanying video series, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, explore selecting schools for college recruiting in depth and features The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner.

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When selecting schools to recruit from, examine the career services office and resources on campus. Does the career services office offer resume books, on-campus interview opportunities, career fairs, or other opportunities for engagement with students? Not every college or university offers these events. When are these events and opportunities available? The school’s event cycle may not match your recruiting and hiring cycle. How much does the school charge for these services/events? Weigh the costs charged by the university when selecting schools to recruit from as well.

Employers must also consider how many other employers they will be competing against in comparison to the number of students/grads or candidates available. It may be better to be a large fish in a small pond. Unless you have fabulous job offers to present, you might not be able to attract top talent.

When selecting schools for college recruiting, it’s also important to evaluate student enrollment data. If you need to hire MBA graduates, and the university’s MBA program is not one of its better programs, that school may not be the best fit for your college recruiting program.

The next video provides tips about narrowing down their list of schools to recruit from.

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Employers should never be afraid to narrow down their target list for selecting schools for college recruiting from year to year. Recruiters will discover that retention is key; you may get terrific talent, but if you can’t retain star employees long-term, a particular college or university might not be the best fit for your company. The longer you recruit, the more historical data you’ll have to fall back on.

Always evaluate and assess your data. Ask the career services office for information about where their students are finding employment. Most career services directors are willing to partner with employers; career services directors who are willing to go above and beyond can help make up for lack of services and events they may not provide. Career services employees can provide employers with the chance to brand themselves on campus and to gain much-needed exposure on campus; they also keep employers in the loop and introduce recruiters to faculty members. Relationships with faculty members prove key in the college recruiting process.

In the last video, experts Dr. Steven Lindner and Dr. Domniki Demetriadou discuss the need to adapt recruiting strategy from school to school.

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The WorkPlace Group experts encourage adaptation of strategy based on the situation and school. There may be some times when it’s appropriate to post jobs online only, and some situations when it’s better to have a strong on-campus presence. It’s important to have a tiered structure around college recruiting. Not all colleges and universities are the same; whatever amount of effort you put into college recruiting will determine your outcomes.

For more tips on college recruiting from The WorkPlace Group, subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out all 15 videos featuring experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou and Dr. Steven Lindner.

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Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

Posted February 11, 2016 by

Multitasking doesn’t matter to recruiters

In college recruiting, employers don’t value multitasking as one of the skills at the top of their list. While multitasking may demonstrate effort, it does not necessarily produce the best results. Many students list multitasking on their resumes because multitasking is a popular soft skill candidates have been taught to list on their resumes. The bottom line is recruiters want to hire candidates who produce results.

Anne Grinols, Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, asserts that employers care more about hiring candidates who have outlined their accomplishments in detail on their resumes over candidates who have simply listed lots of popular soft skills at the top of their resumes.

Photo of Anne Grinols

Anne Grinols, Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business

“Job candidates who say they can multitask think they are saying they can accomplish more than others because they can focus on more than one thing at once. However, multitasking can also be seen as a negative. I think this is because efforts to multitask have had unfortunate results: poor outcomes and burnout of those trying to do it for extended periods of time.

In the real world, most of the time, results count more than the process to achieve them. A good process is more likely to result in consistent, good results; so process matters. But it matters precisely because of the results, not on its own account.

Employers are more interested in outcomes than efforts. Multitasking refers to the latter. I would not use the term ‘multitasking’ on my resume. Instead, I would indicate expertise in multiple areas, timely production and excellence in outcomes.”

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Anne Grinols serves as Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. She teaches in Baylor’s full-time and online MBA programs. Her research areas include interpersonal communication, ethics, and online education. As assistant dean, she supports faculty development in teaching and research, and has a leadership role in the ethics initiatives in the business school. Before coming to Baylor in January 2004, Grinols was director of management communication for the University of Illinois Business School, where she taught management communication and critical thinking for business from 1996-2003 and oversaw the MBA Communication Center.