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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted July 06, 2016 by

What makes job seekers highly effective: Part 2

When job seekers find immediate success, what are they doing right? How are they standing out from the rest of the applicants who earn interviews?

Those job seeker secrets to success were discussed in detail as part of the Successful Job Seekers Research portion of the 2016 Job Preparedness Indicator Study. The survey was conducted in March 2015 by the Career Advisory Board (CAB) established by DeVry University. As part of the research, over 500 job seekers were surveyed and the key findings and data from the research are highlighted in the accompanying video featuring Steven Rothberg, founder of College Recruiter, moderating a discussion with Alexandra Levit, a consultant, speaker, and workplace expert who has written six career advice books, and was formerly a nationally syndicated career columnist for the Wall Street Journal, and Madeleine Slutsky of DeVry University. The interview and discussion takes place from Google’s Chicago offices during the NACE 2016 Conference in June.

Read the first article in this series: What makes a job seeker highly effective, Part 1 and learn more in the video below:


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

What criteria qualifies one as a successful job seeker? According to the 2016 Job Preparedness Indicator Study, this includes:

A. Active job seekers who secured a job offer within six months of their first interview.
B. Passive candidates who already had a job, were recruited, and accepted an offer within 6 months of being recruited.

“That’s pretty successful,” says Levit. “If you’re able to get a new job within six months, you’re doing something right.”

According to the study, the first thing successful job seekers do is target their job search to a specific company.

“The conventional wisdom is that if you just send your resume out to as many people as possible, it’s a number game; eventually something will hit,” says Levit. “In fact, this is the opposite of what we found to be true.”

According to the survey data, 51 percent of active job seekers applied to five or fewer positions, and 66 percent applied to 10 or fewer jobs.

“The majority of our successful job seekers are really going after specific companies they want to work at,” says Levit.

They also know that they are qualified for those jobs, before submitting applications, says Levit. The research showed that 90 percent of job seekers wanted to be at least 75 percent qualified before applying to a targeted company and job, meaning they fit at least seven out of the 10 requirements of the job description before applying. In addition, 41 percent wanted to be at least 90 percent qualified before applying – meaning they fit nine out of the 10 requirements of the job description before applying.

Successful job seekers also customize their resume and job search, and do significant research before putting together their cover letter, resume, and online profile for their target company. The survey results showed that 67 percent of successful job seekers reached out to the company contact person, and 32 percent reached out to their network to get inside info on the target company before applying. In addition, 84 percent tailored their resume to the exact specifics of the job they were targeting, updating it for each job. Translation: A targeted resume is much more effective than a one-size-fits-all resume.

“This is something the Career Advisory Board has been saying for years,” says Levit. “Yes, unfortunately, every resume has to be customized if you want to be taken seriously. That’s what successful job seekers are doing.”

Hiring managers pick up a resume and are going to know, within 20 seconds, if the applicant is a good fit for the job, says Levit. That’s why it’s important to tailor/customize each resume for a specific job.

The study also uncovered some surprising news for job seekers: Successful job seekers don’t necessarily consider job-seeking a full-time role.

Levit said this: “I have to admit, this is counter to the advice I have always given, which has been ‘if you are in the job market and not currently employed, you should be treating your job search like a full-time job,’ meaning you are spending seven or eight hours a day on (the job search). That’s not what successful job seekers are doing.”

The study showed that 47 percent of successful job seekers conducted job search activities a total of one to three hours a day and 45 percent spent less than an hour per day on the job search. This includes writing resumes, networking, searching for jobs, and researching companies, among other job search duties.

“Whatever they are doing is effective and efficient,” says Levitt. “It’s not quantity, it’s quality.”

The bottom line? Successful job seekers put together job searches that target a specific company and job, and write resumes and cover letters tailored to that specific job. They work to connect with people inside the organization for which they are applying, and doing all of this is helping them land jobs faster than those who are not conducting a specific, targeted job search.

Watch the video to learn more about what makes a job seeker highly effective.

For more advice for job seekers, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Posted January 06, 2016 by

10 online platforms to make your cover letters spotless

In January 2016, College Recruiter will publish content intended on assisting college students seeking entry-level jobs upon graduation or summer internships. To learn more information about January’s focus, check out “Connecting the dots: Creating a 2016 career action plan.

The guest articles published in January cover a variety of topics to help students who are about to graduate and search for their first full-time jobs or who are searching for summer internships.

antonio tooley

Antonio Tooley

Before you know it, major life events show up. One day you’re graduating from high school, and the next, you’re getting ready to take a new job you’ve never done or joining a college, which is a new experience altogether. Whether it is a job or a new college, job seekers need resumes, as well as very intriguing cover letters. (more…)

Posted August 16, 2012 by

7 Things not to do after graduation

 

If there’s one thing you can count on after college graduation it is that there will be a long line of people waiting to give you career advice. However, their advice usually revolves around what you should do after you graduate, but there’s plenty of advice on what not to do after school.

Some of us are better prepared for real life after college. Students who earn a professional degree (i.e. engineering, education, nursing, accounting, etc) or who get their first job through a college internship usually have an easier road to travel after they walk across the stage with their diploma. The rest of us, though, often need a little more time to get our careers off the ground.

This extra time can be both a blessing and a curse for recent grads. It is a blessing, because it’s an opportunity to find your best career route. It is a curse, because anxiety and fear about the future can lead to the following post-graduation no-no’s. (more…)

Posted July 27, 2012 by

Candidate Experience – Make It Engaging and Interactive, Part 6 of 6

Joe Murphy

Joe Murphy of Shaker Consulting Group

This is part of a series connected to the Candidate Experience Monograph.

We asked job seekers to clarify their outlook for an interactive application experience two ways.  In general, we wanted to know if there was a strong preference for engaging activities and if there was an expectation for interactive activities over text only experiences.  The large number of neutral responses to a preference for interactive experience might indicate that candidates do not have enough exposure to job applications with this feature to have a strong opinion one way or another.   However, the majority of job seekers have expectations that they will find a more engaging candidate experience than just reading about the job. (more…)

Posted July 09, 2012 by

Eight Changes in the Apply Now Element of the Candidate Experience

Apply NowThe Internet has changed the nature of the Apply Now candidate experience. Paste your resume here is a thing of the past for companies leading the wave of change in how candidates get considered for a job. Leading edge companies are creating an interactive online candidate experience. In this new format the candidate can learn more about the company and the job while the company can learn more useful information about the people applying for the job. This article will help you understand how to obtain the most value from the Careers page of companies deploying best practices for online employment applications. (more…)