ARTICLES, BLOGS & VIDEOS

The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted June 03, 2016 by

Onboarding benefits interns and new hires

Training photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Employers can take different approaches when it comes to their onboarding programs. Some companies focus more on management, while others concentrate on the social aspect. These approaches and others shape new employees into the company culture. Beverly Behrmann, Academic and Career Advisor at Keene State College, discusses how certain companies help college students and new hires succeed in the onboarding process.

“As for onboarding programs, bigger national companies like Liberty Mutual have extensive management programs that work closely with new hires to ensure success. There is a mentoring component and a rotation so new hires can see various aspects of the company and how divisions work.

Here in Keene, there are two local employers we work with often. They are Barton Associates and Electronic Imaging Materials. Both companies build in a social component to integrate new employees. This might include potluck lunches, games, and “fun” gatherings. Both companies also have extensive internship opportunities so college students can get acclimated to workplace scenarios and behaviors in a lower risk situation. If the internship works out, students may transition into full-time employees and have been “socialized” to a certain extent by the time they start as full-time employees.”

Looking for ways to build an onboarding program? Head to our advertising solutions page and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Beverly Behrmann, Academic and Career Advisor at Keene State College

Beverly Behrmann, Academic and Career Advisor at Keene State College

The Office of Academic and Career Advising believes in empowering students to develop lifelong skills that will serve them beyond their time at Keene State College. This philosophy is paramount in creating successful and meaningful outcomes and one Beverly Behrmann wholeheartedly shares. As career advisor, Beverly helps students gain essential skills needed to pursue their academic and career paths. By working with students through individual appointments and class presentations, she provides resources to help them navigate the career development process.

Posted June 02, 2016 by

Helping new hires through onboarding process

Male graduate in cap and gown with diploma photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

For some new hires like college students and recent graduates, starting new entry-level jobs might be intimidating. They can use some help in the onboarding process. New hires need to understand company culture, along with having clearly defined expectations for their positions. When employers communicate important information to new employees, they not only create effective onboarding programs, but they also give employees the necessary tools to succeed. Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs, shares his company’s approach to onboarding.

“Our onboarding program is focused on trying to help employees understand our culture, making sure they have adequate support (especially in the form of mentorship), figuring out exactly what expectations new employees have in terms of where they want to see themselves grow and what positions they aspire to, and getting employees involved in a project as soon as possible. Our view is the best way to learn is by doing, so instead of spending time in lengthy onboarding processes, we make sure the above items are settled and then throw new hires into the mix, eliminating red tape.”

Want to help your new hires in the onboarding process? Check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs

Eden Chen, Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs

Eden Chen is the Co-Founder of Fishermen Labs, one of the fastest growing software development agencies in the US. Eden is a serial entrepreneur and heads up various other startups including Knife and Fox (design agency), Ctrl Collective (co-working), Glo Bible (app with 3 million+ downloads), Zolo Studios (game studio), and Dev Crew (international software development).

Posted May 27, 2016 by

Onboarding should focus on new hire experience

Job, new, time photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

When creating onboarding programs, employers should consider the interests of their new hires. This means focusing on what makes new hires comfortable and engaged with the onboarding process. Companies can take steps to create a smooth transition into the workplace for new employees. Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany, shares ways employers can build effective onboarding programs for new hires.

“A strong onboarding program is created with the new hire experience in mind. Many employers fail to make the first few days for employees exciting or fun. Bring people on and get them excited immediately.

Onboarding starts before new employees ever step foot in the office. So provide them with plenty of information about the company, who they’ll be meeting in the first few days, and what to expect from the entire process of getting oriented with their workspace, team, and tasks. Create an agenda before hiring employees.

Make employees feel comfortable with a clean, new space to work and introduce them to their colleagues. Encourage the staff to build casual relationships with new hires by taking them out to lunch; it establishes trust and respect. Essentially, employers are assigning mentors, employees the hires feel comfortable reaching out to.

Training should cover all of the protocols and procedures, but it needs to be engaging and can even be fun. Make it interactive; create games like scavenger hunts or other competitions to break the ice while also being informative. Technology is great for onboarding because it provides a convenient, easily accessible resource for new hires to find basic information including the dress code, benefits details, and the like, and to see how they fit within the company as a whole.

Be clear about company expectations and invest in training new hires over several weeks. This makes it easier to offer feedback, and go over the first performance evaluation. Consistent feedback and constructive critiques will help them improve on concerns as they arise, resulting in better evaluations and improving the company’s quality of hire.”

Need advice for creating an onboarding program? Get onboard our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

Andre Lavoie is the CEO of ClearCompany, the first talent alignment platform that bridges the gap between talent management and business strategy by contextualizing employees’ work around a company’s vision and goals. You can connect with him and the ClearCompany team on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

Posted May 18, 2016 by

5 onboarding tips to make the first day a success for new hires

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

The first day on the job is always nerve-wracking, especially for the recent college graduate starting their first job, or the entry-level employee taking that next step in their career. That’s why it’s important for employers to create an onboarding program to acclimate new hires and make them feel welcome from day one.

“Sometimes the simplest things get overlooked and the smallest things make a huge impression,” says Julie Desmond, a talent acquisition specialist with Tennant Company, a manufacturer of indoor and outdoor environmental cleaning solutions with over 3,000 employees worldwide.

Here are five onboarding tips to make the first day a success for new hires:

1. New hires must know exactly what to bring
According to a 2009 study by the Aberdeen Group of senior executives and HR staffing and recruiting personnel, 83 percent of the highest performing organizations began onboarding prior to the new hire’s first day on the job. Do this by sending the new employee a checklist of things to bring for that that first day: Driver’s license or form of identification, social security card, and names and numbers of emergency contacts, are a good start. Let them know they will be completing paperwork such as a W-4 or I-9, benefits and payroll forms.

“I’ve been in onboarding sessions where this information wasn’t conveyed in advance,” says Desmond. “As a result, it took longer than necessary to get through this step. We know this is a high-hassle moment for new employees. Making it easy is very, very simple.”

2. New hires must know exactly where to go
We’re not talking directions to the office. And it’s not enough to simply tell new hires what time to arrive that first day on the job. There should be a clear onboarding plan in place, says Desmond. Tell them “when you arrive, ask for Jane Smith. Jane will meet you there and bring you to a conference room where you will complete your new hire paperwork.”

This gives them a point person to reach out to versus showing up and sheepishly asking the front desk staff who to ask for and where to go.

“When people know what to expect, they are more comfortable, better able to learn and process information, and from day one they understand that, here, we communicate clearly and don’t waste time guessing at what’s going to happen next,” says Desmond.

3. Don’t assume the employer knows what you know
The worst part about a new job is just that – it’s new and there are unknowns. That’s why an established person within the company needs to make sure the new hire knows the company dress code, where the bathrooms are, how to ask for days off, and where they can get coffee or a bite to eat. “Everyone forgets these things, because insiders already know,” says Desmond.

4. Have the new hires’ technology in place
This person has been planning for their first day on the job for the past two weeks. So, why is it that new hires always spend part of the first day on the phone with IT?

“Good talent is hard to come by,” says Desmond. “When our new hire heads home at the end of the day, do we want him or her to tweet, “first day on the job, got a cool new laptop and got started on a cool new project already.” Or do we want them to say, “Not sure about the new gig. Spent all day with Freddie from the IT Help desk.”

5. Make the first day special
The little things count, says Bob LaBombard, CEO of GradStaff, a company that serves as a career matchmaker for recent college graduates and companies that are looking to fill entry-level jobs. Make sure the new hire’s work station is ready, announce the new hire company-wide via email (with picture, if possible), describe their background and role and have top executives or department leaders personally introduce themselves to the new hire. “Make sure the new hire knows their presence is important,” says LaBombard. After paperwork is complete, the new hire should meet with their manager, and new team members. If possible, take the new employee out to lunch to get to know them better.

This may just be another day for HR, a manager and other company employees, but for new hires, especially recent college grads, this is arguably the biggest day of their professional career to this point.

It’s important to them – and should also be to employers.

“Day one matters more than ever for new recruits,” says Desmond.

For more onboarding tips, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Julie Desmond, a Talent Acquisition specialist with Tennant Company

Julie Desmond, a Talent Acquisition Specialist with Tennant Company.

 

Julie Desmond is a Talent Acquisition specialist with Tennant Company, a manufacturer of indoor and outdoor environmental cleaning solutions with over 3,000 employees worldwide. Tennant Company is committed to providing a rewarding work environment where employees have opportunities to contribute their unique talents and skills to building an even stronger Tennant.

 

 

Bob Labombard

Bob Labombard, CEO of Gradstaff, Inc.

Bob LaBombard has more than 30 years of business experience in the chemical, environmental, professional services and staffing industries, including 18 years of staffing industry experience as CEO of GradStaff, Inc., and founder and CEO of EnviroStaff, Inc. He is a leader in helping client companies develop comprehensive strategies to fill both short- and long-term staffing requirements.