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Posted July 26, 2016 by

6 ways college seniors should take advantage of career services

You have arrived—it’s your senior year of college. Woo hoo! You have one year to complete of your collegiate journey. You should definitely celebrate. After you celebrate, prepare yourself for a year of job search and career preparation. While your senior year will definitely be fun, it’s also hard work. You’re in the home stretch before beginning your first full-time, entry-level job. And that means you need to take full advantage of the help provided to you by career services employees on campus. This short video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, lists six ways to take advantage of career services to make the most of your senior year so you can land a great job upon graduation.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

In no particular order, don’t neglect any of these important to-do’s your senior year, and seek the assistance of career services staff along the way.

1. Apply for grad school.

If you’re remotely interested in attending graduate school within the next five years, take grad school entrance exams and be sure to check out deadlines for applications for financial aid, assistantships, and other forms of financial aid at the grad schools of your choice. There’s nothing worse than missing a deadline and having to wait a semester or entire year to reapply. Be diligent and keep deadlines marked on a calendar you actually monitor regularly.

2. Apply for jobs.

Begin applying for entry-level jobs unless you’re definitely applying for graduate school and don’t plan on working at all. When should you apply? It depends on the career field and employer, but a good rule of thumb is to begin applying about six months prior to graduation. As long as your resume clearly states your expected date of graduation, employers will understand that you won’t be available to start working until after graduation.

The hiring process takes time. The interview process takes time. It takes employers longer than you’d like to review resumes! Don’t wait until three weeks before graduation to start searching for jobs and then feel disappointed when you have only landed one job interview by July.

3. Get your resume/cover letter in shape.

Ensure that your resume and cover letter are in great shape. These documents will open doors for interviews for you. Clearly list on your resume your expected date of graduation. Ensure that you’ve listed all work experience (internships, job shadowing, part-time work experience, and volunteer experience). Ask your career services professionals to review your resume at least once. Utilize the free resume editing tool on our website. Take these steps and then start applying for jobs.

4. Attend career fairs and follow up afterward.

Definitely attend all career fairs—not just the one on your campus but others as well. Career services staff know about these opportunities. Ask them!

Continue great networking practices. Send invitations to LinkedIn and Twitter after career fairs and thank you cards after interviews. If someone in your network shares a job lead with you, thank them personally and return the favor in the future if you’re able. Following up with employers/recruiters is a huge step you can’t afford to skip in the hiring process.

5. Sign up for on-campus interview opportunities.

These events are key because they provide you with opportunities to network directly with employers without ever leaving campus. It doesn’t get much easier than that. But by all means, do NOT miss your interview or show up late. Arrive about 10 minutes early wearing a suit or other appropriate interview attire. Check with career services to see if they’re hosting an upcoming interview preparation workshop. For that matter, sign up for as many career services events as you can. You’re in the final hours, people. You can’t afford to reject assistance!

6. Career services are free in college–take advantage of this while you can.

Remember that once you graduate, unless your career services office extends services to alumni as well, you will no longer have access to free career services. You’ll have to hire a career coach or consultant, and that comes at a price—a rather high price in some cases.

“As a college student, you have access to so many free career-related resources and events. You will never have this type of access to [free] career services and support at any other time in your career. Take this opportunity and use it,” encourages Grace Whiting, Career Advisor at Roosevelt University.

Indulge yourself in career services and enjoy your senior year!

For more career success and job search tips, follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

 

Posted July 19, 2016 by

5 ways juniors can take advantage of career services

It’s finally your junior year of college. You’re more than halfway finished with your undergraduate courses. Woohoo!

You can certainly breathe a sigh of relief and feel a sense of accomplishment, but you have some serious career-related tasks to accomplish this year. Most college students don’t simply land a great job after graduating. It’s a step-by-step process which requires you to do your part in collaboration with your career services office on campus. As Patricia Niemann, Career Development Consultant, puts it, “career development is the bridge that you will travel from your educational environment to future career opportunities.”

This short video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, lists six ways juniors in college can take advantage of career services to get ahead in the job search game.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Ensure that you’ve written a super solid resume and cover letter.

Now is the time to edit and update your resume with the help of your career services office on campus and to create a basic cover letter if you didn’t do so during your sophomore year. Career services will be glad to help you do this. Most career services offices even host special resume workshops and events, or you can set up a one-on-one resume appointment. No matter what approach you take, get it done. Don’t wait until the day before a job or internship interview. Creating or editing a resume takes time, even for a professional.

 

2. Gain work experience in your field of study.

It doesn’t matter if the experience is paid or unpaid. It doesn’t matter if you work five or 20 hours per week. It simply matters that you gain work experience in your field of study or as closely related to your field of study as possible. Are you majoring in criminal justice? Contact your local police department to ask about opportunities there. Is there a battered women’s shelter or sexual assault center in your area? Perhaps you could serve as a volunteer victim’s advocate. The possibilities are endless, but you have to take initiative. Working with career services is priceless. It’s the job of a career services professional to keep in touch with local employers and to serve as a liaison with organizations like these. Let your career services professionals work as advocates for you. Why do all the hard work yourself if you don’t have to? Don’t overlook sites like CollegeRecruiter.com, either. We can help. When you register, you tell us what you’re looking for, and we send you new job postings related only to your search criteria.

 

3. Up your networking game.

During your first and second years of college, it might have been enough to simply keep your social media sites clean of inappropriate content and to occasionally add new contacts. That’s not going to cut it your last two years of undergraduate study.

Start reaching out to alumni and chatting with employers via discussion boards online. Dedicate at least 30 minutes to these activities per week. Up your game online, and you’ll be surprised how many connections you’ll gain and what types of opportunities may surface as a result. Each time you attend an event with employers present, retain business cards and invite those employers (recruiters, hiring managers, and others) to connect with you on Twitter, LinkedIn, and other professional networking sites. If they don’t accept your invitations, don’t take it personally. If they do connect with you, send a personal message thanking them for adding you. Don’t harass employers online or send annoying messages, but don’t be afraid to like their posts or comment on content they share in a thoughtful and insightful manner.

 

4. Acquire better soft skills.

Ask career services professionals for opportunities to improve your soft skills. Seek feedback from your career services staff on where your strengths and weaknesses lie in terms of soft skills. Are you great at communicating in writing but poor at communicating face-to-face? You might need to practice interview questions with a career services member before conducting on-campus interviews with employers. Are you a strong leader but not so great at teamwork? Find ways to get involved in organizations requiring you to collaborate with others on campus.

 

5. Take grad school entrance practice exams.

If you plan on attending graduate school after you graduate from college, it’s a good idea to take practice exams for the GRE, MCAT, and other entrance exams for graduate schools during your junior year. Most of these are offered at no cost and can be found online. Career services offices often offer assistance in pointing students to these exams or to study guides on many campuses.

 

Lastly, and this is a bonus tip: don’t just attend the career fair your junior year of college.

The career fair is a great event—and a must—but challenge yourself to attend at least two other events sponsored by career services as well. Ask your career services office which events are most important on your campus. Is it the etiquette dinner, on-campus interviews, mock interviews, or other key events? Each campus has its own key events, so don’t assume you know which matter most without asking.

Want more help finding ways to guarantee career success? Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

 

Posted March 23, 2016 by

Planning for college recruitment

Creating a college recruitment program from scratch is a daunting task. This 3-part video series featuring The WorkPlace Group (WPG) experts Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, and Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, provides talent acquisition leaders with suggestions and guidelines for starting their own college recruitment programs.

The video series is hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace. Part 1 provides talent acquisition professionals tips about getting started when planning a college recruitment program.


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The first place to start when planning a college recruitment program is to identify objectives for developing a college recruitment program. This helps identify internship opportunities within the organization; this transfers into considering which degrees match up with internship needs. After this, employers must consider their resources. Resources include not only budgetary items but also time, staffing hours, and travel time.

Dr. Demetriadou advises her clients to determine “what [they] need, where [they] need it, and how much [they] are willing to invest in the process.”

Part 2 helps college recruiters with the school selection process.


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Once college recruiters have identified their objectives and resources, it’s time to do an environmental scan. One of the factors to consider is geography. Will staff need to travel to conduct campus recruiting visits and OCIs (on campus interviews)? Will students need to travel to visit the employer facility/headquarters?

Another factor to keep in mind is diversity, particularly in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields. If the university is large, but the demographics do not offer a diverse candidate pool, recruiters may want to remove the university from the target list or consider re-prioritization.

It’s also important to consider whether it’s more beneficial to recruit nationally or regionally. It may be helpful to create a tiered list for college recruiting.

Consider the curriculum at the universities. Do they match with the available internships and entry-level jobs?

These are just a few of the factors to consider when doing an environmental scan when planning for college recruitment.

Part 3 wraps up the college recruitment planning process and discusses how to narrow down the school selection list.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

Although there is no such thing as having too large a list of schools during the planning phase or beginning stages of the college recruitment planning process, Dr. Steven Lindner mentions that part of the college recruitment process is narrowing down the target list for college recruiting. He reminds viewers that there is a difference between visiting schools and recruiting from them.

In the beginning, it’s great to keep college recruiting options broad to ensure meeting objectives. However, as recruiters consider their resources, they must narrow down the target list significantly in order to work within the constraints of their budgets.

Dr. Demetriadou reminds viewers to “think big, but implement small.”

Continue reading our blog for more featured articles with The WorkPlace Group experts Dr. Steven Lindner and Dr. Domniki Demetriadou. For more videos and tips about the timeline for developing a great college recruitment program, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner, Executive Partner, WPG

Dr. Steven Lindner is the executive partner of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies. He is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, has appeared in many radio and TV interviews and a frequent presenter at HR conferences.  He writes weekly employment articles for the NY Daily News and holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

 

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, is a partner and director of assessment services of The WorkPlace Group®, a leading “think-tank” provider of recruitment services assisting

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

Dr. Domniki Demetriadou, Partner and Director of Assessment Services, WPG

companies ranging from small, fast growing businesses to multinational Fortune 500 companies.  Demetriadou is an expert in Talent Acquisition and Assessment, and a member of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the American National Standards Taskforce. She is a frequent presenter at HR conferences and has led many multinational recruiting programs. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from The Graduate Center at Baruch College, CUNY.

Posted January 14, 2016 by

Job application advice for interns and grads

With the spring semester in full swing this week, many college students have begun to ask themselves (or at least their parents have begun to ask them) that age old question: what am I going to do this summer? Or better yet, if they’re graduating in May, what am I going to do after graduation?

Andy Ek, Manager of College Relations, Koch Industries, Inc.

      Andy Ek, Manager of College Relations, Koch Industries, Inc.

Andy Ek, Manager of College Relations for Koch Industries, offers college students pertinent advice and direction related to searching for both full-time jobs and internships.

What is the best advice you have to offer new college graduates about how to prepare for the job search process in January if they plan to graduate in May?
Regardless of timing, I’d encourage all students to self-reflect on their best natural abilities and their specific career interests. What are they good at and what types of roles would they enjoy doing most?  I think it’s important for each student to research firms that offer careers (not just employment) in their areas of interest.  Students will benefit from networking as much as possible (with peers, faculty, employers, etc).  The knowledge gained from building these relationships will lead students straight toward the opportunities with the most potential.

If students want to work for Koch as a summer intern, when should they apply? Please describe the application process.
The application process for our summer internship program starts at the beginning of the previous year’s fall semester.  For example, most students interested in our summer 2016 intern opportunities applied in mid-September 2015 in order to be considered.  All applications are available on our recruitment website, www.kochcollegerecruiting.com, and will require completion of an online profile, a short questionnaire related to the role’s qualifications, and submission of a resume.  Students eventually hired for a position typically receive an on-campus or phone interview, before traveling to a site location for a second interview.

Have you hired an intern who later became a star employee?
Our goal in employing interns is to identify those individuals with the right mix of virtues and talents required to be successful within our firm.  We are thankful to have had numerous examples of star employees hired through our college recruiting process, including eight who are current or past presidents of various Koch companies.

Want to learn more about how to connect the dots along the path to job search success? Follow our blog and connect with College Recruiter on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

 

Andy Ek is the Manager of College Relations for Koch Industries, Inc. In this role, Andy is responsible for leading Koch’s college recruiting program, managing and developing Koch’s relationships with key universities, and partnering with Koch leadership to determine optimal entry-level talent strategies for their organizations. A native Kansan, Andy is a 2004 University of Kansas graduate with a degree in Business Administration and Accounting – he also earned a Master’s in Business Administration from KU in 2011.  Andy was recognized as one of the Wichita Business Journal’s 40 under 40 honorees in 2015.

Based in Wichita, Kansas, Koch Industries, Inc. is one of the largest private companies in America.  With a presence in more than 60 countries, Koch companies employ more than 100,000 people worldwide, with about 60,000 of those in the United States.