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Posted February 29, 2016 by

10 reasons to reject job offers

Woman tears agreement documents before an agent who wants to get a signature courtesy of Shutterstock.com

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Deciding whether or not to accept job offers could be challenging for college students and recent graduates. When considering a position, there are certain factors that might lead students and grads to turn it down. Here are 10 good reasons to reject job offers.

1. Job seekers should reject job offers if they don’t line-up with their competencies, interests, and values. College students and recent graduates should ask themselves whether they’re good at what they’ll be expected to do if hired, if the work will excite them, and if the work is consistent with their morals. If not, pass on the offer. A job needs to be more than a paycheck.

2. The job doesn’t offer career advancement. Can employees grow within the company? If job offers do not mention anything about advancement, workers will be stuck in a job without the chance for a potential career.

3. Opportunities are sacrificed. Depending on the job, college students and recent graduates may or may not meet a people who have the right contacts. Without networking opportunities, they might miss out on their dream jobs.

4. Reputation is damaged professionally. There is no shame in working somewhere to make ends meet, even if it’s not the job you want. However, a bad work experience can damage one’s reputation with recruiters and hiring managers. Students and grads should find jobs highlighting their skills en route to better career opportunities.

5. The job affects your spirit negatively. College students and graduates need to think about how they would feel in the job. If it does not satisfy them for whatever reason, they will be unhappy and won’t perform well. This creates a negative spirit in people and in the workplace.

Balancing work and life, and busy businessman in concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Crystal Eye Studio/Shutterstock.com

6. Hurts work/life balance. Work is important, but family is more important. If a new job will take too much time away from your loved ones, consider other options offering more flexibility for work/life balance.

7. Salary falls short. Students and grads should do their homework on how much money a job pays, and then compare the salary to the job offer. If the money isn’t what they’re quite hoping for and they believe they can get more, they shouldn’t accept the offer.

8. Money overtakes dreams. In contrast to the previous reason, the pay can be so good and becomes a bigger priority than pursuing your dreams. If students and graduates are tempted by money more than their dreams, they may regret accepting a new job later in life and wonder what could have been.

9. The hiring process isn’t structured. College students and recent grads should consider how they’re treated during the hiring process. Anything that seems questionable is a red flag and is not worth their time.

10. Bad timing. Even when great job offers come along, sometimes the timing isn’t right. While rejecting offers may seem crazy, don’t beat yourself up. A better offer could be waiting down the road.

Need more tips related to your job search? Follow our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube for career tips and motivation.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent grad deserves a great career. We work to create a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and grads to great careers.

Posted June 26, 2015 by

Negotiate your Salary Like A (and With the) Boss

Justin Ethington

Justin Ethington of Your Worth Salary Calculator

Most people shy away from confrontation with good reason. But avoiding confrontation doesn’t mean you can’t negotiate your salary like a boss. Here are the 6 main negotiation strategies for maximizing your salary without being disagreeable.

1. Don’t reveal your target salary too soon. Avoid disclosing your salary expectations until you know you’re a finalist for the job. Delaying the answer without upsetting your potential employer requires timing and diplomacy. To put off answering the salary expectation question, you’ll need your own personalized statement explaining your reasons. Practice this phrase so it sounds natural and friendly. It may save you thousands. Your employer should make the first offer salvo. (more…)

Posted December 30, 2014 by

Help! My Recruiter Won’t Answer My Calls

Personnel recruitment team looking for new employees

Personnel recruitment team looking for new employees. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

As a new graduate (or soon-to-be-graduate), you’re getting ready to hit the job market with everything you have. You’ve heard stories about how rough it is out there, and you have no intention of being left by the side of the road. You’re covering all the bases: Making the most of your online and offline social networks, getting professional help with your resume, and lining up a full schedule of networking events, conferences, and job fairs. You’re also making contact with recruiters.

Congratulations! Your search is on target and you’re setting a clear course to success. But while you work to attract the attention of recruiters and staffing pros, keep a few things in mind. Knowing these things can help you avoid feelings of frustration as you navigate the bumpy road ahead. (more…)

Posted October 09, 2014 by

The 8 Most Common Salary Negotiation Tactics

Jim Hopkinson

Jim Hopkinson, Salary.com contributing writer

Within the language of every culture exists a sub-language – a collection of words, phrases, acronyms, slang, and jargon unique to that area of life, which must be deciphered in order to truly gain an understanding. The language of negotiation is no different.

Wikipedia has a great list of negotiation terms and tactics, so let’s highlight some of them and frame them in terms of salary negotiation. (more…)

Posted October 08, 2014 by

Close to 33% of Graduates in Class of 2014 Landed Jobs by Graduation

National Association of Colleges and Employers logoSome college graduates in the Class of 2014 not only can smile about finishing school but also about getting jobs at the same time.  The number of grads finding employment is nearly 33%, according to one survey.  Learn more in the following post. (more…)

Posted May 20, 2014 by

Work Experience Essential to College Students Looking for Jobs in Accounting and Finance

If you are a college student who wants a job in accounting or finance, make sure you have some work experience under your belt.

According to a new survey from Accountemps, 83% of chief financial officers (CFOs) interviewed said it is important for students to gain work experience in the field during their college years if they are hoping to compete for entry-level accounting and finance positions upon graduation. (more…)

Posted May 16, 2014 by

How to Get an Entry Level Job in 5 Steps

In your search for an entry level job, try these five steps in the following post that can help you get hired.

You can also imagine that landing a job with a company such as LinkedIn means there is a ton of competition. Yet Lillian Chen fought her way to the top… and won the job. So how did this job seeker do it? What was the secret to success?

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Posted April 11, 2014 by

Thinking of Accepting an Entry Level Job Offer? 5 Tips to Help You Make Your Decision

Now that you have landed an entry level job offer, it is important to think about if it’s the right one for you.  There are five tips that can help you make this decision in the following post.

You’ve achieved the Holy Grail of job search – the job offer. Congratulations! You’ve worked hard, and it might be tempting to give an immediate “YES!” to that employer. However, no matter how desperate your situation might be – or how long your job search has been – always take the time to review a job

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Posted March 12, 2014 by

Offered Jobs for Recent College Graduates You’re not Sure About? 5 Questions to Ask Yourself

While college grads who are offered jobs for recent college graduates may want to accept any positions they’re offered, there are five questions they should ask themselves first that are found in the following post.

Out of all of the job interviews completed, you received just one job offer. The problem is, the job isn’t exactly what you want. Do you accept? Or wait for a better opportunity? If you’ve experienced a long-term job search, you probably feel like you better take what you

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Posted December 26, 2013 by

3 Reasons Not to Negotiate Salary After Accepting an Offer

Jim Hopkinson

Jim Hopkinson, Salary.com contributing writer

A common misconception about negotiation is that it is all about winning — always asking for more money at every opportunity, always getting the largest possible salary, always getting the highest possible job title.

While devising intricate strategies, analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of your opponent, and determining a plan of attack can make the process of negotiation seem very much like going to war, the reality is that it is a series of battles throughout your working life. As the general in charge of your own career, sometimes it is wise to pick your battles and know when not to negotiate. Especially after you’ve already accepted the offer. (more…)