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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 11, 2016 by

Multitasking doesn’t matter to recruiters

In college recruiting, employers don’t value multitasking as one of the skills at the top of their list. While multitasking may demonstrate effort, it does not necessarily produce the best results. Many students list multitasking on their resumes because multitasking is a popular soft skill candidates have been taught to list on their resumes. The bottom line is recruiters want to hire candidates who produce results.

Anne Grinols, Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, asserts that employers care more about hiring candidates who have outlined their accomplishments in detail on their resumes over candidates who have simply listed lots of popular soft skills at the top of their resumes.

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Anne Grinols, Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business

“Job candidates who say they can multitask think they are saying they can accomplish more than others because they can focus on more than one thing at once. However, multitasking can also be seen as a negative. I think this is because efforts to multitask have had unfortunate results: poor outcomes and burnout of those trying to do it for extended periods of time.

In the real world, most of the time, results count more than the process to achieve them. A good process is more likely to result in consistent, good results; so process matters. But it matters precisely because of the results, not on its own account.

Employers are more interested in outcomes than efforts. Multitasking refers to the latter. I would not use the term ‘multitasking’ on my resume. Instead, I would indicate expertise in multiple areas, timely production and excellence in outcomes.”

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Anne Grinols serves as Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. She teaches in Baylor’s full-time and online MBA programs. Her research areas include interpersonal communication, ethics, and online education. As assistant dean, she supports faculty development in teaching and research, and has a leadership role in the ethics initiatives in the business school. Before coming to Baylor in January 2004, Grinols was director of management communication for the University of Illinois Business School, where she taught management communication and critical thinking for business from 1996-2003 and oversaw the MBA Communication Center.

Posted July 15, 2015 by

Caring for Your Cover Letter – 6 Tips for Success

Have you given much thought to writing a cover letter when applying for a job?  If not, you may want to think again.  Your cover letter supports your resume, but it also allows you to go into more detail about why you are the best candidate for a job.   Even if you are not required to have one, creating a quality cover letter can help you stand out from the competition.  Show how much you care about your cover letter by following these tips. (more…)

Posted May 19, 2015 by

How to Have a Sterling Online Reputation?

Reputation management concept - golden color text on dark blue digital background

Reputation management concept – golden color text on dark blue digital background. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

There is no doubt whatsoever about the fact that the internet is a great influence of our times. In fact, it might be the greatest influencer that mankind has ever been exposed to and that’s why it makes such a potent and effective marketing tool. Everything that goes online ends up affecting our opinions, emotions some way or the other. That’s why online reputation has become such a big deal these days. (more…)

Posted September 02, 2014 by

Recent College Graduates, Don’t Know What You’re Good at to Find the Jobs You Want? Here’s How to Get Started

For recent college graduates searching for jobs, it’s important for them to know what they can do well to understand the value they can offer a potential employer.  The following post has advice to help them get started.

There are many reasons you may struggle with being taking credit for what you do really, really well. Maybe you were taught it isn’t polite to brag when you were a kid. Perhaps it is because most feedback related to performance is based on corrective action; improving what you can work

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Posted June 20, 2014 by

Disappointed You Didn’t Land an Entry Level Job or Internship? 12 Reasons You Came Up Short

If you did not get hired for an entry level job or an internship, the following post shares 12 reasons that could explain why.

You thought you nailed the interview – and you expected an offer. But the offer never came. The job or internship went to someone else.What went wrong? What happened that made the recruiter choose another candidate? When trying to understand how we could get so close but come up empty, we

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