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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 11, 2016 by

Multitasking doesn’t matter to recruiters

In college recruiting, employers don’t value multitasking as one of the skills at the top of their list. While multitasking may demonstrate effort, it does not necessarily produce the best results. Many students list multitasking on their resumes because multitasking is a popular soft skill candidates have been taught to list on their resumes. The bottom line is recruiters want to hire candidates who produce results.

Anne Grinols, Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business, asserts that employers care more about hiring candidates who have outlined their accomplishments in detail on their resumes over candidates who have simply listed lots of popular soft skills at the top of their resumes.

Photo of Anne Grinols

Anne Grinols, Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business

“Job candidates who say they can multitask think they are saying they can accomplish more than others because they can focus on more than one thing at once. However, multitasking can also be seen as a negative. I think this is because efforts to multitask have had unfortunate results: poor outcomes and burnout of those trying to do it for extended periods of time.

In the real world, most of the time, results count more than the process to achieve them. A good process is more likely to result in consistent, good results; so process matters. But it matters precisely because of the results, not on its own account.

Employers are more interested in outcomes than efforts. Multitasking refers to the latter. I would not use the term ‘multitasking’ on my resume. Instead, I would indicate expertise in multiple areas, timely production and excellence in outcomes.”

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Anne Grinols serves as Assistant Dean for Faculty Development and College Initiatives in Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business. She teaches in Baylor’s full-time and online MBA programs. Her research areas include interpersonal communication, ethics, and online education. As assistant dean, she supports faculty development in teaching and research, and has a leadership role in the ethics initiatives in the business school. Before coming to Baylor in January 2004, Grinols was director of management communication for the University of Illinois Business School, where she taught management communication and critical thinking for business from 1996-2003 and oversaw the MBA Communication Center.

Posted April 02, 2015 by

10 Ways to Be More Productive as an Entrepreneur

Boris Dzhingarov 2

Boris Dzhingarov

If you’ve ever been inspired by Ehsan Bayat’s presentations, you may be wondering how you can make a difference, too. When it comes to running a small business or launching a new idea, productivity is key. Here are a few must-know productivity tips that successful entrepreneurs follow. (more…)

Posted June 24, 2014 by

Help Your Gen-Y Traits Stand Out Among Job Seekers

The things that matter to today’s graduates when it comes to finding workplace happiness are a bit different than that of generations past. In fact, when comparing Gen-X (born during the mid 1960s through the late 1970s) to Gen-Y (born early 80s to early 2000s), there are a number of factors that make them very distinct kinds of employees.

While Generation X is known for its entrepreneurial nature, confidence, and self-motivation, Generation Y is more technologically savvy, can multitask with ease, and isn’t afraid to take risks. As a member of Gen-Y, you’ll want to learn how to play up those attributes to employers so that they are perceived as strengths. For instance, it’s typical for more recent graduates to prefer a workplace that provides staff members with a lot of feedback, has team-building exercises, and gives recognition for a job well done. (more…)

Posted April 01, 2014 by

Have Phone Interviews for Recent College Graduate Jobs? Tips to Help You Succeed

If you’re interviewing for recent college graduate jobs by phone, keep these tips from the following post in mind to have success.

Congratulations! You’ve been selected for a phone screen. Now what? As a recruiter, I’ve witnessed many people struggle with the phone screen stage of the interview process. Too often, candidates end up in phone screen purgatory: getting close to the job of their dreams, but never advancing to the next stage. The good news is

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Posted October 08, 2013 by

Can You Handle an Entry Level Job, While Trying to Get Good Grades in College? 5 Ways to Manage Time Effectively

If you are someone with multiple things on your plate such as an entry level job, college schedule, social life, etc., it could be difficult to find balance.  In the following post, learn five ways to improve time management effectively.

Sleep, good grades or a social life. I was told you were allowed to pick two in college. But wait, what about an internship? Or a job? Now which two are you supposed to pick? The biggest challenge most college students say they have is a lack of time to do everything.

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Posted August 29, 2013 by

Not Enjoying Your Entry Level Job? 6 Ways to Add Some Fun to It

Sometimes, you might find that your work becomes so routine that you lose interest.  So, why not improve your day-to-day tasks on your entry level job?  The following post has six ways to make your position more fun.

If it’s 9:45 a.m. and you’re wondering how you’ll make it through the rest of the day without stapling your hand to your desk, this post is for you. It might be because you’re not feeling challenged, or because you’re not climbing the ladder fast enough, or simply because you’d rather be enjoying the

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