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Posted July 29, 2019 by

Here’s How We Make Productivity the Result, Not the Goal

As founder and CEO of Journeous, which helps young adults choregraph meaningful careers, Pam Baker will be bringing 20+ years of hiring, managing, mentoring and coaching expertise Join us for the College Recruiting Bootcamp on Diversity and Inclusion.)

“Motivation is the art of getting people to do what you want them to do because they want to do it.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower

What motivates you? As someone dedicated to supporting those starting their journey, along with the organizations they work for, to make the most of what each of us brings to the world, I understand the importance of motivation. Yet, I was reminded recently of how different motivators can be for each person.

The first reminder came during lunch with a former colleague – someone I respect immensely who I’d feel fortunate to call a teammate once again. She’d recently started a new job at a hot tech company and despite the majority of MBA students I mentor expressing an interest in working there, she was flabbergasted by its lack of vision and focus. They’re a typical Silicon Valley tech company offering free lunch, ping pong tables and no expectation that anyone ever tucks in a shirt.

She couldn’t understand why people were clamoring to work there. With little leadership grit or direction, she equally couldn’t relate to why people wanted to stay. As I looked around the lunch area, though, it hardly looked like a bunch of demotivated and disengaged employees. The ping pong table was in use, and there was lots of animated chatter and laughter around us. I’ve been around checked out people. This was not such a group.

Winning is Motivation… For Some

My twin daughters provided a second reminder. They’d both played defense on the same soccer team, which ended up winning a total of one game during the season. As I drove them home after their last game, I asked them what they’d thought of the season. I looked in the rearview mirror to see one scrunching up her face and looking at me as if I’d asked the stupidest question possible (experience seeing that face a few dozen times now has helped me decode it). She grumbled, “It sucked. We only won one game all season.” My other daughter looked at her, then at me and said, “I thought it was great.” And then they looked at each other with their expressions seeming to say, “What team are YOU talking about?”

Same team, same position, same games attended, roughly the same playing time. But their motivators were entirely different. One wanted to win. Sure, she liked her team members, but she was driven to get better personally and as a team. The other wanted to be outside and be part of a team of girls she likes.

Their motivation for practicing was different: One wanted to get better, while the other wanted to be outside with her friends. Their motivation for games was also different: One wanted to see the result of her hard work at practice pay off with a win, while the other just wanted to be outside with her friends. Finally, as the season wound on with the losses piling up, their motivation for continuing was different: One because she knew she was getting better and could contribute to bringing the team up in the standings, while the other (you guessed it) could still be outside with her friends. She never even noticed what their team record was.

“Motivation will almost always beat mere talent.” – Norman Ralph Augustine

At my friend’s company, no doubt some were motivated by the company’s status. Others were driven by the freedom and flexibility. Still others by the occasional fun that was injected into their day since ping pong tables appeared to be as ubiquitous as bathrooms.

Leaders, and of course all of us are leaders in some capacity at work and home, must learn to understand and appreciate the differences in what motivates people, including ourselves. When we do, we unlock the key to staying engaged and motivated, as well as motivating those around us – in both easy and stressful situations.

Thankfully, there’s a science behind each of our motivations and needs. It might be the recognition of our work, of our convictions, or of who we are as an individual. It may involve giving us space and solitude, allowing for playful interactions, or incorporating action and excitement in our day.

Knowing and acting on the science behind our motivational needs keeps us from missing out on the talents of those around us. Improved productivity is the result (not the goal) and these diverse perspectives, talents and approaches then quickly become our most valued assets.

Join Pam Baker, along with your fellow university relations, talent acquisition and other human resource leaders from corporate, non-profit and government agencies at the:

College Recruiting Bootcamp on D&I at EY
Organized by College Recruiter and hosted by Ernst & Young
Thursday, December 12, 2019
9:30 AM – 2:30 PM (EST)
Ernst & Young World Headquarters
121 River Street
Hoboken, NJ 07030

For more information and tickets go to: http://www2.CollegeRecruiter.com/BootcampOnDIatEY

Pam Baker is Founder and CEO of Journeous, which empowers participants with new tools to dig in and find answers to complex questions like, “What are my personal values and how might they relate to my career?” Pam founded Journeous after a 20-year healthcare career spent building, leading and mentoring teams where she saw firsthand the challenge – for herself and colleagues – of creating fulfilling careers. Without understanding what was meaningful, though, it was easy to end up in jobs that didn’t click. As a mom of two daughters, Pam’s goal is to change the pattern for today’s young adults to help them choreograph meaningful careers.

The mission of Journeous is to prepare those starting a new journey and the organizations they work with to make the most of what each of us brings to the world. They provide your students and employees the tools to design a meaningful career and to thrive by mastering the art of adaptive communication.

To learn more, visit https://www.journeous.com/

Posted June 24, 2016 by

Using social media to network in college

Social media photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

While college students may use social media for personal reasons, they can also use it for their careers. Social media allows students to find the right contacts and engage with them, which helps students build a professional network. This network can be an asset connecting college students to internships or entry-level job opportunities. Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College, discusses building a network and how to use social media effectively to do so.

“The best time to build your network is before you need it. College students need a strong network when searching for jobs or internships.

It can be very difficult for college students to connect with established professionals because usually those requests are for “one-way relationships” from which ONLY the students stand to gain. That means there are no reasons or motivation for professionals to accept the requests.

LinkedIn is, by far, the best professional research tool in social media. Students can use LinkedIn’s “Advanced Search” feature to identify top networking prospects in their fields.

Unfortunately, LinkedIn is NOT a great engagement tool. Connection requests are easy to deny, and meaningful conversations are rarely on LinkedIn Groups. Twitter conversations, on the other hand, are much more natural and organic. That’s why a multi modal approach utilizing Twitter is so effective.

After identifying prospects on LinkedIn, find and follow their Twitter accounts. Wait until they tweet about an area of mutual interest to respond with a tweet meant to catch their attention. The conversation doesn’t even need to be about a professional topic. A shared interest in sports, movies, etc., can be a great entree into a conversation!

Responding to a targeted Tweet provides the opportunity to build a genuine two-way relationship. After engaging your target and building credibility, take it to the personal level and invite them to meet for coffee to introduce yourself and demonstrate your professionalism in person.”

Need more networking advice? Come to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College & award-winning social media consultant

Chaim Shapiro, Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College & award-winning social media consultant

Chaim Shapiro, M.Ed. is the Assistant Director of Career Services at Touro College, a freelance writer, public speaker and social media consultant specializing in LinkedIn. He has presented his popular LinkedIn Workshop at National Conferences, Universities, Public Libraries and for communal organizations across the country. Chaim earned a Master’s Degree in College Student Personnel from Loyola University, Chicago, and also studied in the Institutional Leadership and Policy Studies Ph.D. program at the University of California, Riverside Graduate School of Education. He has more than 12 years of experience working in college administration.

Posted June 06, 2016 by

Why employees should put extra effort into impressing the boss

Woman raising her hand to ask question photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

At the very beginning of your career, you may be faced with the fact that all the knowledge and the diplomas in the world will not be enough to save you if you are on your boss’s bad side. You will end up watching from your cubicle how other people are getting promoted, while you are sitting there and doing the same things you have done on your first day at work.

You see, when people graduate they are full of confidence and hope, and that is not a bad thing, but books and tests are just the basics that should be upgraded with experience and interpersonal relationships. One of the people who can affect your professional growth the most is your boss, and you should do your best to make that relationship productive and mutually beneficial.

Learning from your boss

One of the main reasons why you should have a good relationship your boss is the opportunity to learn from someone who is in a position you would love to be in the future. If you are constantly giving your maximum with work tasks and showing consistency and dedication, you will have the right to participate in some important conversations and find out many valuable things, not only about the company you are working in, but also about the road to success.

Self-improving

At first, your motivation may be just to impress your boss, but as time goes on, your dedication and efforts will grow to become habits and make your career success even more certain. Showing up to work early and taking initiative might seem like “sucking up” to your boss to other employees and to you yourself, but actually, when you think about it, there is nothing wrong with these actions. On the contrary, they showcase you as a well-educated and ambitious man/woman.

You are the image of your boss

… and vice versa. A good boss surrounds himself with competent people, and if you show to be anything other but that, you will not only make your boss look bad, but also create a negative image about yourself, which can impact your position in the firm, and even future employment opportunities. If you on the other hand, do your best to make your boss succeed, you will show that you are a great employee worthy of going up the corporate ladder.

Improving your current job

If you want to love the job you are doing, you have to make it a job you can love. The best, and possibly the only way to do so, is to make your boss fond of you. If you are consistently productive and assigning for the difficult tasks, you will have a more pleasant relationship with your boss, which will make your working hours less stressful. Beyond that, you will get better assignments and maybe become the right-hand-man/woman.

Getting promoted

The ultimate goal of every employee would never even be considered without a long process of impressing the boss. After all, your boss is the one handling the decisions about transfer of the employees to a better job. If you notice he is giving you some extra projects and work, accept it with enthusiasm, because this can be a part of grooming you for higher jobs, and eventually even his position. So, make sure you are on his radar by struggling to get new challenges and more recognition, instead of struggling to get your work done.

Some people would love to spend their days at work unnoticed to avoid conflicts and critiques, but by doing so, they are also avoiding praises and opportunities. Do not be one of those people and fight your way up to the top, in a struggle where impressing your boss is your best chance to succeed.

In search of more career advice? Come to our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

Nate Vickery, guest writer

Nate Vickery, guest writer

Nate Vickery is a marketing manager and a blogger. He is also the editor-in-chief at BizzMarkBlog.

Posted April 20, 2016 by

Training to interview entry-level job candidates

Young woman being interviewed for a job courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Piotr Marcinski/Shutterstock.com

Some hiring managers may believe they don’t need much preparation to interview candidates for entry-level jobs. However, getting the most value out of these interviews requires interviewers to understand what they are looking for in potential employees. Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany, discusses the benefits of training hiring managers to interview candidates for entry-level jobs and offers advice for the hiring process.

“Entry-level jobs don’t get enough attention sometimes. They can provide value for any organization. A new hire who excels at an entry-level job wants to continue succeeding and, ideally, grow within your organization. By training hiring managers to interview entry-level candidates, employers can save their companies time and money, build their internal talent pipelines, and encourage internal talent mobility.

Hiring managers need to be equipped with the skills and knowledge to effectively find quality talent. When they evaluate entry-level job seekers, discerning their job skills can be difficult to do. Train hiring managers to ask the right questions to identify the crucial skills candidates possess and to accurately assess candidates’ soft skills and motivation.

The best method for training, evaluating, and improving your hiring process is by looking at analytics. Quality of Hire is the perfect tool for seeing how well your hiring managers are recruiting. It considers performance and goal achievement, as well as retention rates.

This metric informs the overall quality fit for people joining the team and provides leadership with the tools necessary to see how well managers are hiring for company culture and performance. We access this metric through our own talent management platform to consistently evaluate and improve our processes to ensure we are building the best team possible.”

For more information on interviewing job candidates, go to the College Recruiter blog and follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook.

Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

Andre Lavoie, CEO and Co-Founder of ClearCompany

Andre Lavoie is the CEO of ClearCompany, the first talent alignment platform that bridges the gap between talent management and business strategy by contextualizing employees’ work around a company’s vision and goals. You can connect with him and the ClearCompany team on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

Posted March 21, 2016 by

Social media showcases job seekers’ skills

Social media symbol courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Arcady/Shutterstock.com

While many college students embrace social media for personal use, it also serves a professional purpose. Using social media websites such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and others help job seekers create a brand for themselves based on who they are and what they can offer employers. With recruiters and hiring managers using social media to find job candidates, showcasing relevant skills is important for all job seekers, including college students and recent graduates.

• Create a personal brand – Your personal brand represents who you are and what you have to offer. It is what separates you from everyone else. Recruiters need to know if potential candidates have a brand that fits their company culture.

Lean on LinkedIn – LinkedIn is a networking website for professionals. College students can highlight their skills and areas of expertise, as well as connect on LinkedIn groups based on their career fields. Through connections on the site, you can express their interests in career fields, and learn more about career fields and job opportunities. Another way to show passion for an industry is to write about it. Providing original and unique content demonstrates to recruiters and hiring managers how knowledgeable you are in specific areas.

Use Facebook and Twitter – For job seekers who like keeping up with the latest news in their industries, Facebook and Twitter might interest them. On Facebook, you can participate in groups relevant to your career field and learn more about potential employers who are searching for the best job candidates. On Twitter, while there aren’t groups, you can use hashtags with keywords industry insiders will notice, and stay up-to-date with companies. You can also participate in discussions hosted by companies on Twitter, retweet content posted by companies’ Twitter handles, and reply to Tweets by companies with thoughtful comments to gain positive attention by those employers.

Build an online portfolio – Social media profiles give job seekers an opportunity to build online portfolios. Similar to a resume, job seekers should highlight skills and accomplishments relevant their career fields. Consider including articles, photos, and videos for the portfolio.

More than anything else, hiring managers want to know candidates can do the job. Your school, major, GPA, and class projects help hiring managers determine that, so showcasing your accomplishments with related work experience will give you a big leg up on the competition. Use LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, and even Facebook to demonstrate qualifications, as many recruiters will Google candidates’ names if they’re interested in hiring you. Be sure that when recruiters search for you online, they find nothing but positive results.

Need more tips on social media related to your job search? Follow our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube for career tips and motivation.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent grad deserves a great career. We work to create a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and grads to great careers.

Posted February 29, 2016 by

10 reasons to reject job offers

Woman tears agreement documents before an agent who wants to get a signature courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Bacho/Shutterstock.com

Deciding whether or not to accept job offers could be challenging for college students and recent graduates. When considering a position, there are certain factors that might lead students and grads to turn it down. Here are 10 good reasons to reject job offers.

1. Job seekers should reject job offers if they don’t line-up with their competencies, interests, and values. College students and recent graduates should ask themselves whether they’re good at what they’ll be expected to do if hired, if the work will excite them, and if the work is consistent with their morals. If not, pass on the offer. A job needs to be more than a paycheck.

2. The job doesn’t offer career advancement. Can employees grow within the company? If job offers do not mention anything about advancement, workers will be stuck in a job without the chance for a potential career.

3. Opportunities are sacrificed. Depending on the job, college students and recent graduates may or may not meet a people who have the right contacts. Without networking opportunities, they might miss out on their dream jobs.

4. Reputation is damaged professionally. There is no shame in working somewhere to make ends meet, even if it’s not the job you want. However, a bad work experience can damage one’s reputation with recruiters and hiring managers. Students and grads should find jobs highlighting their skills en route to better career opportunities.

5. The job affects your spirit negatively. College students and graduates need to think about how they would feel in the job. If it does not satisfy them for whatever reason, they will be unhappy and won’t perform well. This creates a negative spirit in people and in the workplace.

Balancing work and life, and busy businessman in concept courtesy of Shutterstock.com

Crystal Eye Studio/Shutterstock.com

6. Hurts work/life balance. Work is important, but family is more important. If a new job will take too much time away from your loved ones, consider other options offering more flexibility for work/life balance.

7. Salary falls short. Students and grads should do their homework on how much money a job pays, and then compare the salary to the job offer. If the money isn’t what they’re quite hoping for and they believe they can get more, they shouldn’t accept the offer.

8. Money overtakes dreams. In contrast to the previous reason, the pay can be so good and becomes a bigger priority than pursuing your dreams. If students and graduates are tempted by money more than their dreams, they may regret accepting a new job later in life and wonder what could have been.

9. The hiring process isn’t structured. College students and recent grads should consider how they’re treated during the hiring process. Anything that seems questionable is a red flag and is not worth their time.

10. Bad timing. Even when great job offers come along, sometimes the timing isn’t right. While rejecting offers may seem crazy, don’t beat yourself up. A better offer could be waiting down the road.

Need more tips related to your job search? Follow our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube for career tips and motivation.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent grad deserves a great career. We work to create a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and grads to great careers.

Posted February 15, 2016 by

3 tips for a focused job search

Man writing job search diagram on glass board

tommaso lizzul/Shutterstock.com

College students must stay focused when conducting a job search for entry-level jobs. This means eliminating distractions. Consider these three tips to help you conduct a more focused job search.

1. One creative and effective idea for a more focused job search is creating a weekly workflow plan every Friday afternoon for the following week. Which organizations will you reach out to for the first time, how, and when? Which organizations will you follow-up with for the second time, how, and when? Which organizations will you follow-up with for the third time, how, and when? Plan your job search schedule in the same way your college courses are planned out with syllabi.

2. Limiting the number of times you check email and text messages will help you stay focused on your job search. If you’re always glancing at your inbox, it will take away from time-consuming tasks such as writing resumes and cover letters. Unless messages are urgent, answer them later.

3. Setting timeframes and goals is another way to stay focused. Creating a plan provides college students with structure in finding jobs. By breaking down the time to search for jobs into individual parts, you won’t overwhelm yourself, and you will feel a sense of accomplishment by completing tasks.

A successful job search requires a commitment. By avoiding distractions, you won’t get sidetracked from that commitment. College students and recent grads who stay focused will ultimately land great entry-level jobs.

Need more tips related to staying focused and motivated during your job search? Follow our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube for career tips and job search motivation.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent grad deserves a great career. We work to create a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and grads to excellent entry-level jobs.

Posted February 01, 2016 by

In the job search, all experience matters

Babysitting experience with woman holding puppy and watching little girl

antoniodiaz/Shutterstock.com

When college students begin the job search process, they often feel defeated before they begin if they believe they have no real work experience, but that is never true. All have some knowledge and skills, and they are all transferable. For example, the only job a student may have had was babysitting, so a student may feel that won’t help them land an internship. It is true that others may have more experience, but there are transferable skills acquired from babysitting such as being organized and responsible. If the same family hired you over and over again, that demonstrates that you performed well.

Classroom-related experience is also of value to recruiters and hiring managers. While some candidates applying for the job may have done similar work before for pay, employers will also value the work you’ve completed for a grade so be sure to include academic projects on your resume related to the job opening. Remember to list what you’ve learned in the classroom under the “experience” heading on your resume. Even if you weren’t paid for the time, it doesn’t mean it wasn’t valuable and that you didn’t work just as hard as someone else who acquired similar skills.

 

Need more tips related to transferable skills, gaining work experience, and your job search? Follow our blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube for career tips and job search motivation.

At College Recruiter, we believe every student and recent grad deserves a great career. We work to create a quality candidate and recruiter experience. Our interactive media solutions connect students and grads to excellent entry-level jobs.

 

Posted January 11, 2016 by

5 things keeping job seekers from their dream jobs

sandra lambert

Sandra Lambert, guest writer

Many factors can contribute to our overall happiness, and dream jobs we love are a top one. Working in a pleasant and rewarding environment goes a long way in helping us feel happier and more content, but sadly, many people aren’t working in their ideal occupations. In many cases, our own actions prevent us from landing dream jobs, and several factors might be holding job seekers back.

1. Procrastination

Do you have big dreams, but put off the work to achieve them? Do you live by the motto “why do today what you can put off until tomorrow?” The people who are most successful in life rarely procrastinate because they understand procrastinators will always work from behind and try to play catch up. Successful people develop the discipline and skills to stay a step ahead, allowing them to accomplish more and reduce the stress on their lives.

Procrastination is a major culprit when considering what keeps job seekers from finding their dream jobs. While postponing tedious tasks is tempting, it won’t help job seekers reach their goals. Instead, break large projects down into smaller, more manageable parts, and work on strengthening discipline and determination in order to achieve career goals.

2. Lack of people skills

To find their dream jobs, job seekers must connect with people. They don’t need to become best friends with everyone, but having good social skills is a necessity. While submitting a resume to an interesting job is easy, make a good impression by reaching out to recruiting managers or other professionals to further connect. Even if job seekers aren’t ready to start their new job searches, they should practice their people skills by having conversations with colleagues, bringing in cookies for the next team meeting, or doing something nice for a stranger.

3. Fear of failure

fear of failure words in red 3d letters and a man jumping over it to overcome a challenge such as anxiety or uncertainty

Fear of failure words in red 3d letters and a man jumping over it to overcome a challenge such as anxiety or uncertainty. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Mental health professionals have determined losing a job can be as emotionally detrimental as losing a close family member. For that reason, it is pretty easy to see why the fear of failure is completely paralyzing to some people, and can leave someone complacent. Unfortunately, if people aren’t willing to take risks, they aren’t liable to get where they want to go. While job seekers shouldn’t make any rash or irresponsible decisions, sometimes they simply must take a leap of faith and see if they end up in their dream jobs. Additionally, getting the advice of motivational speakers can be a great resource in providing motivation to chase dreams despite a fear of failure.

4. You’re stuck in your comfort zone

Do we find ourselves sticking to activities familiar to us? When is the last time we ventured out of our comfort zones and tried something completely new? Unfortunately, if we’re stuck in our comfort zones, we are really limiting our opportunities in life, including the potential to land our dream jobs.

Luckily, there are ways to expand upon our comfort zones to find new opportunities. Take a proactive approach to improving flaws and try new things. Find a volunteer opportunity to connect with new people or learn a new skill. This builds stronger, more outgoing personalities in people and helps them learn new things from other different and interesting people. Expanding to try out brand new situations helps us gradually move out of our comfort zones and gives us the confidence to pursue our dream jobs.

5. Organization isn’t your strong suit

If we are extremely disorganized, we’re setting ourselves up for failure when it comes to getting the jobs we want. Fortunately, there are various ways we can increase our productivity and improve our organization skills, including helpful apps to assist us in creating to-do lists to keep on track with our workloads, projects, and activities. By better organizing our lives and the steps we take to get our dream jobs, we’ll identify our occupational priorities so we can move in the right direction.

It is never too late to pursue our dreams, but we need to stop putting them off today. By identifying what exactly might be holding us back from our dream jobs, we can take the steps to eliminate obstacles and get where we want to be in life.

Sandra Lambert is a CISCO certified computer networking specialist. She has a keen interest in writing about her knowledge and experiences. She writes about technology as well as about business. She has also developed interest in public speaking. You can follow her on Google+ and Twitter.

During January 2016, College Recruiter is publishing content focused on assisting college students searching for entry-level jobs upon graduation or summer internships. Learn more about our focus in “Connecting the dots: Creating a 2016 career action plan.

Posted November 04, 2015 by

Employee resource groups: Win-win for employees and employers

Even though “employee resource groups” begin with the word “employee,” both employees and employers benefit from these groups. On one hand, employees acquire a support system that helps them learn and grow professionally and personally. On the other hand, employers watch their workers perform better by learning new skills. ERGs are a win-win for employees and employers.

College Recruiter is currently focusing on employee resource groups (ERGs), publishing the opinions of experts based on a series of questions. In today’s article, Angela Talton, Senior Vice President of Global Diversity and Inclusion at Nielsen, explains how employee resource groups benefit employees and employers. (more…)