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The latest news, trends and information to help you with your recruiting efforts.

Posted February 24, 2016 by

Senior year job search: A timeline

Robyn Scott, guest writer

Robyn Scott, guest writer

All of a sudden students are part way through their senior year of college, and employment (or unemployment) is just a few short months away. Students who wait to look for jobs until college is over will generally find they are unemployed or working at a part-time job they don’t like for the entire summer.

Of course, lucky students will have secured positions by the fall, but many will need to search for much longer than that. No two students will have the exact same experience. Employment opportunities vary depending on the field, time of year, and flexibility of the job seeker. Recent graduates who are willing to relocate or consider full-time internships, for example, may have more opportunities than people looking for full-time paid employment in their current city only. To avoid post grad unemployment, it’s good for students to start their job search while they are still in college.

1) First semester senior year

During the first semester of senior year, students are not likely to receive a full-time job offer. Although there are a few high demand fields, most students will be doing preliminary research at this point. Students are encouraged to begin networking with people in their chosen career fields if they haven’t already done so. They can also start investigating which companies hire new graduates and find out if recruiters will be on campus during the year. Additionally, the first semester is a good time to meet with professors or professionals within the field to get information about possible opportunities in the future. Although most companies are not going to give an official interview at this point, they may offer an informational interview. A familiar face is more likely to be hired later on.

2) Beginning of second semester senior year

Once students get to their second semester of their senior year, they can start legitimately looking for jobs. Many companies hiring new graduates will begin their recruitment process at this point knowing their employees can’t start until the beginning of summer. One of the most challenging issues for students at this point is finding a balance between school and the job search. It’s important students devote their full attention to study the week before midterms and finals but still manage to send out applications and meet with recruiters.

Woman filling out application during job search courtesy of Shutterstock.com

pixelheadphoto/Shutterstock.com

3) End of second semester senior year

By the end of the second semester, it’s important students are sending out completed job applications on a regular basis. There is not a magic number but one to two applications per week will serve as a good, minimum goal. In addition to applying for jobs the traditional way, students should be actively networking and refining their resumes. Also, it’s important to tailor each cover letter to a specific position. The human resources department can easily tell who made the effort to read the entire job description and who wrote a standard letter.

4) The summer after graduation

The majority of college seniors will not have secured full-time employment by their graduation date. However, this is when it’s important to stay motivated and get creative. In addition to continuing a full-time job search in a specific field, recent grads should look at viable part-time positions, paid internships, and transition jobs that can help them build their resumes. There are several companies that won’t hire somebody until they have a couple years of experience, so that dream job may be just around the corner. In order to beef up their resumes, recent grads can be creative and have two part-time jobs or look into the possibility of something near their field, if not directly in it.

Looking for more advice on the job search? Go to College Recruiter’s blog and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Twitter.

Robyn Scott, a guest writer for College Recruiter, is a private tutor with TutorNerds LLC. She has a BA from the University of California, Irvine, and a MA from the University of Southampton, UK.

Posted February 08, 2016 by

Job candidates: How to find them

Choosing amongst job candidates courtesy of Shutterstock.com

aslysun/Shutterstock.com

Organizations often overlook having an open house or another face-to-face meeting as a relatively inexpensive way to hire multiple people for one or more roles. The best candidates do not apply for jobs simply because they’re open to taking new jobs, and they happen to be qualified for jobs recruiters want filled. College students and recent graduates are far more likely to be interested in applying, interviewing, accepting job offers, and staying with a company for years if they understand the organization, the work environment, and the team they’d be working with from the beginning of the process. (more…)

Posted September 04, 2014 by

Want to Get a Meeting to Discuss an Entry Level Job Opportunity? Tips to Help You Prepare

Before getting an entry level job, it is not a bad idea to learn more about the position and company by talking with someone.  If you want to getting a meeting to discuss a job opportunity, then learn some tips to help you prepare for a potential one in the following post.

Networking is the key to landing a job but people dread it even more than the idea of running a marathon. They’d rather push their bodies to the limit than put themselves in a potentially awkward situation with another human being. Surprisingly, networking and running a marathon share a common path to success – preparation. The more you prepare and train the easier it will be and the better you’ll perform. Unlike getting rock-hard abs, training for a networking coffee meeting will take you more than 5 minutes every day, but the additional 55 minutes will be well worth it.

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Posted August 04, 2014 by

College Students, Are Your Summer Jobs as Interns about to be Over? 7 Ways to Conclude Them on a Good Note

With their summer jobs as interns winding down, college students may be looking to end them in positive ways.   In the following post, learn seven ways to finish internships on a good note.

August is right around the corner. Summer is almost over… and, by definition, so is your summer internship. So now is a good time to think about the final weeks of your summer gig, and perhaps the last chance you’ll have to tie up loose ends, communicate with colleagues and make yourself stand out to your supervisor…

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Posted June 24, 2014 by

How to Go from an Internship to an Entry Level Job – 12 Ways to Achieve this Goal

If you’re an intern who wants an entry level job at the company you’re working for, learn 12 ways to achieve this goal in the following post.

Your internship is a great way to gain experience, develop skills and greatly improve your chances of getting catching a recruiter’s attention. Even better, many internships lead to a job offer; I had three internships during my college career, and the last one turned into my first full-time job! This is how I

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Posted May 28, 2014 by

Networking in Person to Learn about Jobs for College Students? Don’t Commit These 7 Sins

If you’re networking face to face to learn more about jobs for college students, make sure not to commit these seven sins found in the following post.

In some circles networking has a bad reputation. In part, this is because of a few bad networking apples who spoil it for everyone else. As someone who has attended (and hosted) thousands of networking meetings and events — and is often referred to as a ‘master networker’ – I’m going to let you in on a few

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Posted May 16, 2014 by

Are You Networking for Recent Graduate Jobs? 4 Ways to Make Your Meeting a Success

When networking for recent graduate jobs, you want to make the most of each opportunity.  In the following post, learn four ways to make your meeting a success.

Someone recently paid $610,000 to share coffee with Apple CEO Tim Cook. To the person who won the bidding war: sip your latte slowly. Every gulp will run you about 50 grand. And it may be worth it… because a networking meeting with the right person can open doors never thought possible. Which is why

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Posted April 18, 2014 by

Is It Time for an Entry Level Job Interview? Here is What You Need to Know

While you might not know all what to expect in your entry level job interview, the following post includes an infographic that can give you some idea.

In a survey of 2,000 bosses, 33% said they know within the first 90 seconds of meeting a candidate whether they’ll hire that person. A minute and a half. That is how much time you have to make what obviously needs to be a very strong first impression…

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Posted March 20, 2014 by

Need career guidance? A mentor can help

Young mentor going over work with his new colleague

Young mentor going over work with his new colleague. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Managing a fast-paced career can feel a little like navigating a minefield. You want to excel, of course, not only by doing your best work, but by being innovative, confident, and creative. At the same time, you’re trying to steer clear of mistakes you’ve seen others make, as well as the plethora of unforeseen pitfalls that can cause a career to stall or become obsolete altogether. Whether you’re at the beginning of your professional career, or at the peak of it, it’s hard not to feel like you’re on your own. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Support and guidance can be yours, if you find and retain the right mentor to help see you through. (more…)

Posted February 28, 2014 by

Going on Informational Interviews to Learn More About Entry Level Jobs? How to Put Together Your Questions

If you are excited to learn more about entry level jobs, but are not sure how to go about determining which questions to ask, the following post offers some helpful advice.

Featured: Featured Before going into an informational interview, you must be prepared. If an executive is willing to give you their time, you want to show them that you appreciate their time and you take the opportunity very seriously. Go into the meeting looking sharp, carrying a clean notebook and pen (not a crumpled up piece

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