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Posted June 09, 2016 by

Taking onboarding to the next level

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Photo by StockUnlimited.com

Congratulations! You’ve landed your dream job – or at least the job that now represents a stepping stone on the path to that dream job. Either way, a new experience is on the horizon.

All companies, regardless of size, have an onboarding process. The onboarding process welcomes new employees to the organization. Some companies formalize the process and run it through a distinct human resources department. Others may have a more informal process that connects new employees with a more seasoned professional to help you learn the ropes.

Regardless of which process you encounter, making the most of your onboarding experience is a great way to begin your new career.

Since you never have a second chance to make the first impression, take the bull by the horn and rock your onboarding experience.

Be Punctual

This should go without saying, but show up on time – early even – when starting a new job. Showing up on time shows that you respect your colleagues’ time. They are busy professionals, and the onboarding process may be tightly scheduled in among a number of competing priorities.

If you’re unfamiliar with the area, take a dry run at locating the office in normal traffic to ensure you know the route. Above all, leave extra time for unexpected events.

Be Personable

A smile goes a long way when meeting new people for the first time. Dust off your most social persona and make it available during the onboarding process. Find out what you can about the company culture, important dates to consider, and what it takes to be a successful employee with your new employer.

Be Proactive

Many companies will assign workplace mentors to new hires. Mentors generally serve as someone who can help you get established, answer routine questions as you get settled, or direct you to the appropriate resources to find the correct assistance. If the mentoring program is not defined, ask your contact if they can recommend a senior employee and make the connection. Mentors are likely extremely busy, so reach out to a workplace mentor and set up a lunch meeting. Use that downtime to establish a relationship, seek advice, or learn more about the company’s culture or advancement prospects.

Be Pensive

Ask questions. Use the onboarding process to find out as much as you can about the new company, your new positions, and your new coworkers. If applicable, find out as much as you can about expectations for someone in your position. Learn as much as you can about training options available. Connect with any social or philanthropic organizations sponsored by your new company to connect with other employees and begin building your network.

Be Productive

While you were hired for a specific position, the onboarding process may expose you to a wide range of functions and opportunities available in the company. Gather as much information as you can. Look for opportunities to make your mark – even on your first day. If there are processes that can be improved or angles which can be exploited for cost savings or revenue generation, find out who would be the best person to submit those suggestions moving forward. Innovative ideas and process improvement strategies are valuable skills to help you stand out.

For more onboarding tips, check out our blog and follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Guest writer Vera Marie Reed is a freelance writer living in Glendale, California. This mother of two specializes in education and parenting content. When she’s not delivering expert advice, you can find her reading, writing, arts, going to museums and doing craft projects with her children.

Posted May 31, 2016 by

5 tips for enjoying new employee training

New employee training is a basic part of the onboarding process in most companies. If you’re starting your first full-time, entry-level job, chances are, you’ll be required to participate in multiple training seminars and workshops with coworkers and other new employees. If you’re rolling your eyes and downloading new apps to distract you during the workshops, take five minutes to watch this video and read this article before making the decision that new employee training is going to be the worst part of the hiring process.

This short video, hosted by College Recruiter’s Content Manager, Bethany Wallace, might change your mind about what new employee training and professional development is all about.


If the video is not playing or displaying properly click here.

1. Be prepared.

The night before new employee training, get some sleep. The worst thing you can do prior to a full day of training and workshops is stay up all night and arrive with just a few hours of sleep under your belt. While the coffee is usually free-flowing at most new employee training events, there’s no amount of coffee in the world that can compensate for lack of sleep when you’re sitting in a chair and listening to speakers back to back all day long, no matter how engaging the subject matter. Don’t set yourself up for failure (or for a huge embarrassment, like snoring or drooling on your first day of training). Get at least six hours of sleep, eat a real breakfast, and do some research online about the subject matter on the training agenda if it’s provided in advance. You’ll look like a rock star if you have a few great questions prepared on the training topics, and what better way to impress your new boss?

2. Get involved.

Be a mindful listener and active participant. Sit near the front and middle of the room; this helps you to stay engaged in conversation and pay attention to the speaker, whether you want to or not. If you have questions, work up the courage to ask. This helps you to get involved, but it also keeps training sessions interactive for everyone else, and that’s a good thing.

3. Be open-minded.

When reviewing new employee training agenda, try not to zone out immediately. It’s easy to assume none of the information will be helpful or apply to your particular position. If you make snap judgments about the material being covered or assume the speaker has little to share that’s interesting before he opens his mouth, you might miss out on great learning opportunities which could enrich your career. There’s nothing more attractive to an employer than a new employee who’s willing to grow and learn.

4. Don’t worry about what others think.

Are you afraid to sit at the front of the room because you don’t want people to look at you? Are you afraid to ask questions because you might sound stupid? Are you afraid to introduce yourself to the speaker or presenter after the workshop because you don’t know what to say? Those are normal fears, but if you allow your fears to dictate your actions in training situations, you’ll miss out on great opportunities for growth.

Remember that new employee training is for you. If you can remember this, you might be able to care less about what others think and base your decisions on what’s going to benefit you, help you perform your job well, and help you reach your career goals.

5. Think about networking.

Set a goal to network with at least two participants and one presenter when attending new employee training. If you find that the training topics aren’t that interesting, this gives you a side goal to focus on that’s still productive. At lunch or during breaks, introduce yourself to other new employees or to the recruiters and human resources managers hosting the training sessions. Introduce yourself to the presenter whose session you find most interesting, and ask at least one question about the subject matter. Follow up with these new contacts after the training session on social media via LinkedIn, Twitter, or another popular site, and maintain the connections you made.

Professional networking can help you form amazing connections, and these connections can lead to great career opportunities.

For more onboarding and networking tips, visit our blog and connect with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.